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Author Topic: How does quantum entanglement work?  (Read 445 times)

Offline jerrygg38

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How does quantum entanglement work?
« on: 13/07/2016 22:09:06 »
How does Quantum entanglement work?
    This is a topic that I am just studying now. A single photon can be split into a pair. One sister photon travels large distances and is captured. The other sister remains in the lab. Changes to the lab sister cause changes to the external sister so that they are entangled. The speed of change is estimated at 10,000 light speed or instantaneous. Einstein called this spooky.
   The simple universe operates at light speed C. The more complex multi-light-speed universe goes up toward light speed infinity. Although the physical spectrum of universes is separate, the dark energy levels all coexist at a common center point. Thus light speed 10,000C is no problem for the more complex universe.
   Quantum mechanics has proposed many different universes that a particle can exist in. I do not believe this. Firstly how large is a proton? Scientists measure it to be very tiny. Is that true? The physical image or mass is very tiny. However the proton has been radiating energy for approximately 13.78 billion light years. Thus the proton is as large as the universe itself. The same is true of the electron. The photons share the same fate. So when you split the tiny photon, you are splitting something that is 13.78 billion light years in size. You send one half into the lab and the other half a hundred miles away.
 The two sisters may be one hundred miles apart but they are tied together by their common radiated image.  If you change one the sister will be affected. Since the universe has infinite light speed capability, the reaction will be instantaneous.
  The problem is the belief that a particle exists where it is. It is only a small part of the particle that realty exists where it is. In “Doppler space time” I explained that a particle is really a focal point of a field. Thus it existed at a distance of 13.78 billion light years. I have changed my concepts in my “Gravity and the Dot-wave theory” to say that a particle exists where it is but the radiated image is 13.78 billion light years. In any event the error in QM thinking is to believe that a proton is a tiny thing. In truth a proton is huge.
  Anyway I will have to study Quantum entanglement a little more but all it proves to me is that the multi-light-speed universe with near infinity light speed may be the correct solution.


 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #1 on: 22/07/2016 05:26:10 »
How does Quantum entanglement work?
    This is a topic that I am just studying now. A single photon can be split into a pair. One sister photon travels large distances and is captured. The other sister remains in the lab. Changes to the lab sister cause changes to the external sister so that they are entangled. The speed of change is estimated at 10,000 light speed or instantaneous. Einstein called this spooky.
...
I need some clarification from someone more familiar with this subject.
According to Planck's law, energy of a single photon is E=hf.
If it is split into a pair, what is the energy of each half?
Is the frequency of the split pair different than the original photon?
Is it possible to split the pair further into quadruple? or even further more?
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #2 on: 23/07/2016 11:30:45 »

I need some clarification from someone more familiar with this subject.
According to Planck's law, energy of a single photon is E=hf.
If it is split into a pair, what is the energy of each half?
Is the frequency of the split pair different than the original photon?
Is it possible to split the pair further into quadruple? or even further more?
   I have not studies this topic much but if you split a photon then the energy of each part will be less. If you split it in half the energy of each half would be 0.5hf. This frequency of each half will be half the original frequency. I guess it may be possible to keep splitting it but as the frequency drops you get out of the light spectra.
 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #3 on: 25/07/2016 18:08:35 »
   I have not studies this topic much but if you split a photon then the energy of each part will be less. If you split it in half the energy of each half would be 0.5hf. This frequency of each half will be half the original frequency. I guess it may be possible to keep splitting it but as the frequency drops you get out of the light spectra.
In your scenario, if you start with visible light, after first splitting you would end up with infra red already. This doesn't seem to happen in experiments.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #4 on: 26/07/2016 13:32:53 »
   I have not studies this topic much but if you split a photon then the energy of each part will be less. If you split it in half the energy of each half would be 0.5hf. This frequency of each half will be half the original frequency. I guess it may be possible to keep splitting it but as the frequency drops you get out of the light spectra.
In your scenario, if you start with visible light, after first splitting you would end up with infra red already. This doesn't seem to happen in experiments.
   I am working on another model of the photon right now. So my answer would be no good. What does the experiments really show? One photon is split and becomes two photons of the same energy level? That would imply that the splitting caused a duplication to occur. Can you shed more light on the process or lead me to the details.
 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #5 on: 26/07/2016 16:18:39 »
I am working on another model of the photon right now. So my answer would be no good. What does the experiments really show? One photon is split and becomes two photons of the same energy level? That would imply that the splitting caused a duplication to occur. Can you shed more light on the process or lead me to the details.
I found two distinct explanations on this issue. First in this article http://www.livescience.com/50262-spooky-action-is-real.html

Quote
To do this they fired a beam of photons at a splitter, so half of the light was transmitted and half was reflected. The transmitted light went to one lab and the reflected light went to the other. (These were "Alice" and "Bob" of the thought experiment.)

The light was transmitted as a single photon at a time, so the photon was split in two. Before the photon was measured, it existed in a superposition state.

One lab (Alice) used a laser as a reference, to measure the phase of the photon. If one thinks of light as a repeating sine wave, phase is the angle one is measuring, from 0 to 180 degrees. When Alice changed the angle of her reference laser, she got varying measurements of the photon: Either her photon was in a certain phase or it wasn't present at all.

Then the other lab (or Bob) looked at their photons and found the photons were anti-correlated with Alice — if she saw a photon he did not, and vice versa. The state of Bob's photon depended on what Alice measured. But in classic physics that shouldn't happen; rather, the two particles should be independent of one another.

And the other article http://www.livescience.com/28550-how-quantum-entanglement-works-infographic.html
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Entanglement occurs when a pair of particles, such as photons, interact physically. A laser beam fired through a certain type of crystal can cause individual photons to be split into pairs of entangled photons.

 The photons can be separated by a large distance, hundreds of miles or even more.

 When observed, Photon A takes on an up-spin state. Entangled Photon B, though now far away, takes up a state relative to that of Photon A (in this case, a down-spin state). The transfer of state between Photon A and Photon B takes place at a speed of at least 10,000 times the speed of light, possibly even instantaneously, regardless of distance.

 

Offline hamdani yusuf

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #6 on: 26/07/2016 16:31:10 »
Basically in the first article, only one observer can detect the photon at a time. So there is no problem with energy balance and frequency splitting.

While in second article, both observers detect the photon pair simultaneously, but they get opposite spin states. But no mention about energy balance nor frequency splitting here, which leaves them as open questions.

Unfortunately the articles dont show the detail setup of the experiments, so for now I can't comment further.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #7 on: 28/07/2016 20:45:05 »
Thanks I have no ideas right now. This week I have some painting and carpentry to do so I will have to stop thinking on this topic until next week.
 

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Re: How does quantum entanglement work?
« Reply #7 on: 28/07/2016 20:45:05 »

 

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