The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What was the value of the gravitational constant at bigbang?  (Read 209 times)

Offline jerrygg38

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 781
  • Thanked: 27 times
    • View Profile
What was the value of the gravitational constant at big bang?
   As I see it, the gravitational and electrical constants of the universe vary with time.  Although it appears that they are truly constant, that is not necessarily true. It may also be possible that the light speed C is also a variable but if we allow C to vary, our equations become very difficult to make judgments concerning the big bang.
   The shrinkage of the universe from nearly infinity to big bang caused all the energy in the universe to take a purely spherical shape. The inward flow caused a homogeneous state at big bang. All the inward energy provided us with a spherical linear inward component. At that time everything was dark energy dark matter.
  The inward spherical linear type energy was sufficient to cause the small ball of energy to explode. However, the gravitational constant was different. In the dot-wave theory, the gravitational constant units are:
G = Meters^2 / coulomb seconds
 As we shrink the universe the ruler shrinks and the clock shrinks. For a constant light speed both meters and seconds shrink or expand together. Therefore for a constant charge universe, the gravitational constant at big bang was zero. Therefore nothing held the universe together at big bang and it exploded. As we go toward infinity the gravitational constant heads toward infinity since meters is getting very large and the seconds tracks the meters. This causes the universe to stop expanding and the entire universe compresses toward big bang.


 

Online jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3913
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
The value of G would have to be considered to be undefined until the separation of gravity from the other three forces. Would its value be the same as now? That I can't answer. I don't have a particle accelerator handy.
 

Offline jerrygg38

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 781
  • Thanked: 27 times
    • View Profile
The value of G would have to be considered to be undefined until the separation of gravity from the other three forces. Would its value be the same as now? That I can't answer. I don't have a particle accelerator handy.
The first three sentences are understandable as standard thoughts. the last sentence appears to me as a fun sentence you made up. Does it have any other meaning?
 

Online jeffreyH

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3913
  • Thanked: 53 times
  • The graviton sucks
    • View Profile
The third sentence was my attempt at a joke. I obviously failed.
 

Offline jerrygg38

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 781
  • Thanked: 27 times
    • View Profile
The third sentence was my attempt at a joke. I obviously failed.
No you did not fail. It gave me a laugh but I was being polite.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums