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Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« on: 19/07/2016 18:47:53 »
The earth's greatest telescopes can see galaxies many millions of light years away.  However strange observations suggest all is not what it seems. Distant galaxies are emitting light from stars that is a lower frequency then it should be because the space between galaxies is getting larger and less dense but why?

ON top of all this, the galaxies appear to have more mass then they should because of the rate at which galaxies spin and retain their defined shape is greater then expected.

The truth is that dark energy is actually exactly what Einstein predicted long ago.  Gravity waves, The properties of gravity waves have the power to condense space as it flows through it at the speed of C.

But why is dark energy actually gravity waves you ask? Well to answer that question you have to ask a question, were did these gravity waves come from, well these waves have a huge amount strength to be capable of doing what it does to the entire visible universe. were did the energy for such a thing come from.

The big bang of coarse or more accurately what existed before the big bang, the singularity a single giant black hole with the combined mass of the entire universe inside it, if it existed that means that it would have had a powerful gravitational field considering the mass of the dang thing you have to wonder what happened to it's gravitational grip on space-time when the big bang converted all that mass into energy in a single instant (the big bang)  The fabric of space itself must have rippled like when a rock hits a pond of water.

These ripples I speak of are gravitational waves, And they are big, very big...  So big indeed that they are literally bigger then the entire visible universe in wavelength.  The red shift we observe in galaxies is the result of this part of the universe riding down the slope of a gigantic gravity wave toward the bottom of the wave.

Our visible space is coming from a more condensed state (top of the gravity wave) to a less condensed state (bottom of gravity wave)

Dark energy is a wave and so it's got a sine wave form of expansion and contraction (as apposed to dark energy expanding space to infinity) In our time, we just happen to be on the expansion side of the wave. soon galaxies will blue shift and come closer together not only that.  The space between stars will get smaller which will cause stars to orbit the black holes of their galaxies with more strength causing the illusion of dark-matter  because without knowing that dark energy's gravity waves existed you would not know to factor them into the equation.

You have to realize that galaxies have probably been through a few of these waves already and have increased in speed similarly to an ice skater spinning with their arms and legs out ward then pulling in their ligaments inward to increase their rotation speed, Galaxies do this when they get in the more condensed side of the gravity wave and for millions of years they increase in momentum because of the wave facilitated virtual increase of a galaxies gravitational attraction to itself do to the influence of the gravity wave when the gravity waves are at their wave peaks galaxies spin faster because its like getting energy from the gravity waves.

Dark matter is the miscalculation of the amount mass in galaxies and the universe do to the existence of huge gravity waves created by the big bang influencing them.


Please comment.

One other thing is that it may be possible to prove my theory by calculating what size these waves would have to be to get galaxies to look the way they do. If you can calculate the exact frequency of the gravity waves and the exact amplitude then you would be able to tell exactly how big the big bang actually was.

You could tell how much mass is in the entire universe if you could calculate the size of these gravity waves and calculate how big the black hole before the big bang would have to have been to produce a wave like dark energy.
« Last Edit: 19/07/2016 22:11:13 by chris »


 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #1 on: 19/07/2016 23:08:25 »
You said "Dark energy is a wave and so it's got a sine wave form of expansion and contraction (as apposed to dark energy expanding space to infinity) In our time, we just happen to be on the expansion side of the wave. soon galaxies will blue shift and come closer together not only that.  The space between stars will get smaller which will cause stars to orbit the black holes of their galaxies with more strength causing the illusion of dark-matter  because without knowing that dark energy's gravity waves existed you would not know to factor them into the equation."
GG:  Waves take many forms. You specify a sine wave as if there is a back and forth oscillation. Often waves may be pulses. thus you get a positive pulse of energy followed by zero. then you get another positive pulse of energy. This would cause the universe to expand and keep expanding. The Fourier series of such a wave would have a DC component followed by a series of sine waves. It will never go backwards.
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #2 on: 20/07/2016 15:47:36 »
Indeed

Jerrygg38 you are correct in saying what you said, My terminology simply was not clear.

I would like to also add that gravitational attraction never really goes away it just gets smaller and smaller Until it's to small to care about however It never really goes away, it still effects the universe millions of light years away.

Photons are bent by gravity just in a way too small to measure away from stars and black holes. keep these things in mind when I tell you this next thing...

Imagine that you are a photon of light blasted out of the big bang and you are still traveling to this day on the literal front line between a massive pulse of photons like yourself and literal nothingness. You have been traveling for 13 billion light years and getting farther and farther away from any mass or stars however there will still be a gravitational force exerted on you the photon an incredibly weak force but still a force indeed... gravity,  over trillions and trillions of years any photons that escape the universe with mass and stars in it, and goes into the great nothingness will eventually find an orbit around the mass of the universe  much like an electron cloud around an atom
the mass of the universe will have a photon cloud.

this photonic orbit around the nucleus (mass filled universe) will eventually get closer and closer to the nucleus but over trillions and trillions of years the mass of the universe will recombine into a mega massive black hole again but wont do anything yet, not until the very last wave of photons gets sucked into it, because the last wave of photons absorbed by the mega black hole would be the first in the universe to begin with YOU the photon and your countless others photon buddies made by the big bang, that pulse of light which you are part of would be the last thing to be sucked in to the black hole all at the same moment.

when the black hole sucks in the final photon pulse it will set the thing off and cause it to explode into another big bang.

Please comment
« Last Edit: 20/07/2016 15:51:18 by ScientificSorcerer »
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #3 on: 20/07/2016 20:30:43 »
Basically I agree with what you say. But we might get thrown into new theories because you have the basic mechanism of the oscillating universe. However it is my belief that protons radiate energy (they are hot) and thus eventually they are gone. I like that you bring your photons into nothingness because it is my belief that the entire universe existed within the black hole at big bang. Thus space is nothingness but fills up with the photonic fields and the electromagnetic fields. then it expands toward infinity but the clock and ruler change so I get a normalized cycle time of `1088 billion years which by clock ticks is basically your trillions of years.
   Thus your model and analysis is correct in my opinion. But I am an independent thinker and author. And the establishment has a long way to go to reach your conclusions or mine.
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #4 on: 21/07/2016 07:10:48 »
I was told that my dark energy theory was quite legit in the past however there is just one part of this theory that does not make sense to me and that is what happened to the energy contained in the gravity waves? Does that energy escape the black hole's grasp and travel forever into nothingness?

Is there even energy contained in gravity waves at all or is it just a consequence of geometry.

I do think it's important enough to look into.

what do you think.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #5 on: 21/07/2016 13:35:39 »
I was told that my dark energy theory was quite legit in the past however there is just one part of this theory that does not make sense to me and that is what happened to the energy contained in the gravity waves? Does that energy escape the black hole's grasp and travel forever into nothingness?

Is there even energy contained in gravity waves at all or is it just a consequence of geometry.

I do think it's important enough to look into.

what do you think.
Dark energy theory
“I was told that my dark energy theory was quite legit in the past however there is just one part of this theory that does not make sense to me and that is what happened to the energy contained in the gravity waves? Does that energy escape the black hole's grasp and travel forever into nothingness?
Is there even energy contained in gravity waves at all or is it just a consequence of geometry.
I do think it's important enough to look into.
What do you think?”
  In 1981 at age 42 when I started my studies of gravity and space time, I realized that the visible universe is constantly radiating into nothingness. Thus the protons and all particles are erasing. This fills the universe with what I call dot-waves. In 2000 I self-published “Doppler Space Time”, where I derived all my equations of the universe from an Engineering model perspective. It cost me a lot of money and it went all over the world but only on a small scale. Last December after my aortic surgery I decided to rewrite the theory and I self-published on Create Space and Kindle “The Gravitational Wave and the Dot-wave Theory”. At this time I came to realize that it is wrong to think that the universe exists within a checkerboard. This means that the background is pure nothingness and everything from big bang created the gravitational fields and the electromagnetic fields.
   This means that the properties of space and time are all dependent upon the gravitational waves and the electromagnetic waves. Thus string theory is meaningless and Einstein’s space time is really the properties of the waves themselves. Space does not compress it is the waves that compress. Space itself is nothingness without properties.
  In order to produce the plane of the universe, the big bang is possibly an initial big bang which brings the black hole into billions of points on a sphere. Then the mini-bangs occur and the energy is centered on the sphere in galaxies. At this time the expansion of the universe is much greater than light speed until the mini bangs. Then the energy of billions of galaxies flows outward in space from a distance Ru toward large dimensions but at the same time flows inward toward the initial big bang starting point. This is like a fireworks display in which the rockets to upward and them explode. Thus if billions of rockets went up and then exploded we would get a universe that appears to be a plane.
   In any case Einstein’s concepts are incorrect but his electrical equations for particular problems are excellent.
  Now for your questions. As the energy flows outward it has a linear momentum.  The dot-waves join together to form spheres. As the energy of the physical universe changes into pure photonic energy, a point is reached where the driving force of the radiation of the universe becomes zero. We run out of fuel. The whole universe turns into spherical energy and reaches the maximum size and stops. Then it is like surface tension and the sphere of energy starts to compress. Pure potential energy in spherical form compresses producing an inward spherical momentum vector.  The spherical compression continues and we return to the original big bang starting point. Then the explosion happens again.
  The gravitational waves are the result of the radiation of the mass/energy of the visible universe. There is only 4 % of the big bang energy left in visible form. Thus 96 percent of the big bang energy is in dark matter/dark energy. If all the big bang energy went into the protons and electrons, then the initial protons were 25 times more massive and had 25 times the charge. Alternately a lot of the big bang energy could have gone directly into dark matter/dark energy and the protons were less. One thing that appears true to me is that the initial protons and electrons we equal in mass and that the electrons lost the battle for the center spot. Yet other answers are possible.
   As far as geometry is concerned we live in a simple Newtonian universe and that should be self-evident to most engineers and practical people. The math tends to mislead many people as they get to believe that we live in a strange universe whereas the simple Newtonian universe is the simple answer and in my opinion is the true answer.
  As far as being important enough to look into, of course because what you say is on the path to the truth. It is unfortunate that Einstein’s electrical equations were excellent to solve many problems and predict many things. He brought us great knowledge but he turned true existence into a mathematicians Universe whereas we live in a practical Engineering universe. Thus as an Engineer who builds things it is self-evident to me that a Newtonian Universe is the correct answer.
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #6 on: 22/07/2016 08:55:46 »
you say that only 4% of the mega black hole's energy came out in mass and photons, No doubt those numbers represent the estimated normal mass vs dark mass in the universe based on observations of dark matter and dark energy.

But I think that the gravitational waves which gave rise to dark energy and dark matter could not possibly contain 96% of the big bang's energy.

During the big bank all mass in the universe was converted into energy all at one time.  Each particle contains mass and in each particle's mass there is energy, a lot of energy but the strength of each particle's gravitational field is very weak in comparison.  The strength of the gravitational waves would have to be far less then the energy contained in the photonic explosion it self because the gravitational wave strength is dependent on the energy contained as mass in each particle.

Imagine if you took a particle, lets say a proton... This proton has mass and a tiny gravitational field, if I suddenly convert this proton into energy then energy will be released in the form of electromagnetic waves and also in tiny gravitational waves as well.  But the gravitational waves created by this process would be so small and weak that you could not measure them.  But you could measure the electromagnetic energy emitted by the process to be very large and powerful.  the same ratio of gravity waves and electromagnetic waves is emitted by the big bang as you are really just converting countless protons neurons and electrons into energy which would give you the same ratio of electromagnetic waves vs gravitational waves

There is no possible way that the gravitational waves created by the big bang contains more energy then the big bang it self, the gravity wave strength would be less then 1% of the entire big bangs energy combined not no dang 96% that answer was created because of the lack of explanation as to how galaxies were spinning so fast now that gravity waves are known to be responsible then the amount of mass in the universe is as much as it appears, no need for shadowy mass called dark matter.
« Last Edit: 22/07/2016 09:10:06 by ScientificSorcerer »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #7 on: 22/07/2016 11:19:31 »
Quote from: scientific sorcerer
the gravity wave strength would be less then 1% of the entire big bangs energy combined
When you look at the gravitational energy of a proton compared to its mass-energy, you come out with a very low ratio.
But that is because all our experience in the Solar System is in weak gravitational fields.

If you look in strong gravitational fields, the ratio is quite different.

The first gravitational waves that were detected in late 2015 are thought to be emitted from the collision of two black holes with masses 30 and 35 times the mass of the Sun. It is estimated that about 3 times the mass of the Sun was converted into gravitational waves, or a conversion efficiency of 5%.

This is a lot higher than your 1% expectation, but still a long way short of the estimated 27% of Dark Matter in the universe.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_observation_of_gravitational_waves#Astrophysical_origin

Oops! This next section seems to be off-track, talking about Dark Matter, not Dark Energy...
Quote
These ripples I speak of are gravitational waves, And they are big, very big...  So big indeed that they are literally bigger then the entire visible universe in wavelength.
Several searches are underway for long-wavelength gravitational waves - one search is looking at cyclic phase changes in the blips emitted by distant pulsars.

But this new theory about the nature of dark matter does not seem to account for the finding of gravitational lensing studies, which suggest that dark matter clusters around visible galaxies. I expect that gravitational waves would continue propagating away from galaxies, instead of being gravitationally bound to individual galaxies or clusters of galaxies.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lens
« Last Edit: 22/07/2016 21:20:23 by evan_au »
 

Offline puppypower

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #8 on: 22/07/2016 12:04:58 »
Why doesn't dark energy prevent matter from forming stars, planets, galaxies and superstructures? Why does dark energy only exert its influence in the space between stars and galaxies? If dark energy is expanding space-time, everywhere, this should counter the contraction of space-time induced by GR as matter forms stellar clouds and stars. This will make it appear like there is less mass acting.

What makes more sense is dark energy is just the accumulative exothermic output from gravity, as gravity lowers potential. The analogy is when the EM forces lower potential, such as an electron lowering energy level, the energy given off can induce an electron elsewhere into a higher energy level. It is not two separate forms of energy, but one connected energy.

For example, rotations which occur due to gravity, create a force vector away from the center of gravity; centrifugal force. The dynamic event; rotation induction, is consistent with the impact of a sustained exothermic output as gravity acts. The potential that escapes beyond the rotation, influences matter beyond. Since energy can't be created or destroy, but can only change form, the universal gravitational output economy accumulates in the space between, creating a global expansion affect.
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #9 on: 22/07/2016 21:29:55 »
I have seen those pictures in the past, the ones which refer to dark matter clusters.  It appears to be blue blotches made in Photoshop.

Perhaps the mass of galaxies interacts with gravity waves and bends them like how waves of water bend around rocks in a river or stream or how gravity bends light. Gravity could be distorting the wave as it passes through galaxies.

Imagine a galaxy as a vortex pool and you have a wave of water pass over it. Some distortion will occur in the wave and may physically change the shape of the wave by having regions with slightly more or less gravitational wave energy in them. call it turbulence in the wave form caused by massive objects such as galaxies. This Turbulence makes the filaments which galaxies form in because it has slightly more gravitational wave induced space-time densities.

I mean to say that what's happening in those photos may be the result of a gravity to gravity interaction between the gravity of galaxies and the gravity of the waves as the waves pass through galaxies.

Just a thought.

Please comment
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #10 on: 22/07/2016 23:09:36 »
you say that only 4% of the mega black hole's energy came out in mass and photons, No doubt those numbers represent the estimated normal mass vs dark mass in the universe based on observations of dark matter and dark energy.

But I think that the gravitational waves which gave rise to dark energy and dark matter could not possibly contain 96% of the big bang's energy.


During the big bank all mass in the universe was converted into energy all at one time.  Each particle contains mass and in each particle's mass there is energy, a lot of energy but the strength of each particle's gravitational field is very weak in comparison.  The strength of the gravitational waves would have to be far less then the energy contained in the photonic explosion it self because the gravitational wave strength is dependent on the energy contained as mass in each particle.

Imagine if you took a particle, lets say a proton... This proton has mass and a tiny gravitational field, if I suddenly convert this proton into energy then energy will be released in the form of electromagnetic waves and also in tiny gravitational waves as well.  But the gravitational waves created by this process would be so small and weak that you could not measure them.  But you could measure the electromagnetic energy emitted by the process to be very large and powerful.  the same ratio of gravity waves and electromagnetic waves is emitted by the big bang as you are really just converting countless protons neurons and electrons into energy which would give you the same ratio of electromagnetic waves vs gravitational waves

There is no possible way that the gravitational waves created by the big bang contains more energy then the big bang it self, the gravity wave strength would be less then 1% of the entire big bangs energy combined not no dang 96% that answer was created because of the lack of explanation as to how galaxies were spinning so fast now that gravity waves are known to be responsible then the amount of mass in the universe is as much as it appears, no need for shadowy mass called dark matter.
Naked Scientists 7,22,16
SS= scientific sorcerer, GG = jerrygg38
SS: you say that only 4% of the mega black hole's energy came out in mass and photons, No doubt those numbers represent the estimated normal mass vs dark mass in the universe based on observations of dark matter and dark energy.
I did not mean to imply that. The compression at big bang produces mass and photons and some dark energy as well. How much of each I do not know. The mass eventually shows up as protons and electrons and other particles and sub-particles. These constantly radiate into dark energy gravitational waves. Thus gravitational radiation is continuous.
SS: But I think that the gravitational waves which gave rise to dark energy and dark matter could not possibly contain 96% of the big bang's energy.
GG: Not then for sure but over the last 13.78 billion years it does now contain 96% of the big bang’s energy.
SS: During the big bank all mass in the universe was converted into energy all at one time.  Each particle contains mass and in each particle's mass there is energy, a lot of energy but the strength of each particle's gravitational field is very weak in comparison.  The strength of the gravitational waves would have to be far less then the energy contained in the photonic explosion it self because the gravitational wave strength is dependent on the energy contained as mass in each particle.
GG: The first sentence that all mass was converted into energy is debatable. I consider the mass at big bang to take a spherical oscillation form.  However at the big bang there was axial spherical momentum flowing into the mass. Thus it was both mass and axial spherical energy. If it was pure mass it would never have exploded. In addition you say that the gravitational wave strength is contained within the mass of each particle.
   Then we have to ask how large a particle really is? If a proton has been radiating energy for 13.78 billion years then the proton is that large. Thus the originally mass of the proton is much larger than the small proton you see now. Of course the proton radiation combines with the radiation from huge numbers of protons so that it is difficult to distinguish the individual proton from the dark energy field.
   SS: Imagine if you took a particle, lets say a proton... This proton has mass and a tiny gravitational field, if I suddenly convert this proton into energy then energy will be released in the form of electromagnetic waves and also in tiny gravitational waves as well.  But the gravitational waves created by this process would be so small and weak that you could not measure them.  But you could measure the electromagnetic energy emitted by the process to be very large and powerful.  the same ratio of gravity waves and electromagnetic waves is emitted by the big bang as you are really just converting countless protons neurons and electrons into energy which would give you the same ratio of electromagnetic waves vs gravitational waves
GG: What you say is very good from the point of view of what you presently see and measure. But if you look back in time when the universe was small, the energy of the initial proton became stretched out and if you could capture all this energy it would be approximately 12.5 times as much. I have not tried to calculate this.
SS: There is no possible way that the gravitational waves created by the big bang contains more energy then the big bang it self, the gravity wave strength would be less then 1% of the entire big bangs energy combined not no dang 96% that answer was created because of the lack of explanation as to how galaxies were spinning so fast now that gravity waves are known to be responsible then the amount of mass in the universe is as much as it appears, no need for shadowy mass called dark matter.
GG: No doubt the inward axial momentum at the big bang produced a lot of energies including a rotation of the entire universe. For an engineering approximation I calculated 0.39C for the speed of rotation but that is only a ballpark approximation. So how much of the big bang produced mass and how much rotational and axial momentums are a problem for the mathematicians and beyond my Engineering ballpark models.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #11 on: 22/07/2016 23:20:54 »





But this new theory about the nature of dark matter does not seem to account for the finding of gravitational lensing studies, which suggest that dark matter clusters around visible galaxies. I expect that gravitational waves would continue propagating away from galaxies, instead of being gravitationally bound to individual galaxies or clusters of galaxies.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lens

  GG: As I see it gravitational waves coming from a galaxy do not operate like simple photons. they tend to be spherical forms of energy and jump from space to space. As galaxy mass converts into energy the the present forming waves push against the prior waves. The backpressure is our gravity. The radiation of the waves pushes against the universe and expands it. Thus the galaxy will tend to keep a large amount of the radiated gravitational waves near it.
   Photons tend to flow out at the speed of light but the gravitational waves have a reaction that operates at the speed of light but the energy will stay close to the galaxy.
 

Offline ScientificSorcerer

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #12 on: 27/07/2016 14:29:43 »
jerrygg38

you get what I mean, excellent.

I wonder though how can I get this theory tested and hopefully proven.  It seems legit but I am unsure who do I take this Idea to anyhow? Do I just go to a collage and talk to a professor? Do I write NASA a letter?

I am also open to any questions.


But so far we covered quite alot to sum it up

Dark energy = gravitational waves which are millions of light years in wavelength.

Dark energy was created by the big bang because there was a mega black hole before the big bang and when the big bang happened the black hole discharged its gravitational energy into gravitational waves which still propagate to this day, we know these gravity waves as dark energy.

The fabric of space time appears to be expanding because we are headed down a gravitational wave's backside toward it's trough, the entire visible universe is riding down a giant gravity wave, in our time we are traveling from a wave crest down toward a wave trough which means we are on the decompression side of the wave.

Dark matter is the miscalculation of mass in the universe via the missing factor of massive gravity waves influencing galaxies spins.

The cluster of dark matter around galaxies is do to galaxies interacting with the gravity waves, causing a type of turbulence in the gravitational wave which is difficult to sum up but it sort of bends (a guess you could call them gravitons?) into galaxies because galaxies attract them and cluster around them.  Is sort of similar to the way galaxies cand bend light.

And that's the theory in a nutshell a guess.

what do you think, any objections or questions?

Please comment.
 

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Re: Is dark energy actually gravitational waves?
« Reply #12 on: 27/07/2016 14:29:43 »

 

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