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Author Topic: Why is the proton stable?  (Read 420 times)

Offline jerrygg38

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Why is the proton stable?
« on: 31/07/2016 22:29:30 »
Why is the proton stable?
 The proton when broken apart appears in the form of quarks and photonic energy. This appears to be Einsteinian type energy due to the high velocity motion of the quarks close to the speed of light C.  The question is whether the quarks actually exist within the proton or are merely the byproduct of the breakup? The electron exhibits interesting behavior as shown by the double slit experiment and the quantum entanglement experiment. Sometimes it is a particle and sometimes it is a wave and sometimes it exists and sometimes it does not exist.
  To the best of my knowledge the proton does not exhibit such behaviors. If the proton was merely a charge Q with Einsteinian energy levels, it should behave like a heavy electron. So if we look inside a proton and it was a single structure, it would appear that it could degenerate readily and become a positron. Thus it would be quite unstable.
   The stability of the proton appears to come from the tri quark structure. Thus the energy within the proton by being divided into three parts provides a greater stability than a single structure.
   It could be thought that long ago after the big bang there was super protons and super electrons with higher energy levels. Then the proton won the battle and held the center spot and the electron radiated all its surplus energy. However we would be left with an unstable proton. Thus a more likely possibility is that the universe produces the proton structure and the electron structure separately. Thus the electron is not really a radiated antiproton but a part of a matched set of multiple quarks and the electron.
   What do you guys think?
   


 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: Why is the proton stable?
« Reply #1 on: 31/07/2016 22:34:29 »
Wave-particle nature certainly exists for protons! They can diffract, tunnel, and exhibit other quantum behavior, they're just much more massive than electrons, so their wavelengths are much shorter.
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Why is the proton stable?
« Reply #2 on: 31/07/2016 23:13:22 »
In experiments smashing electrons together, it seems that there is no internal structure to an electron (at least with the energy levels we can reach today). At higher energies, the electron wavelength becomes shorter, but the behaviour does not fundamentally change.

In contrast, the structure of a proton is complex, and as you smash them together at higher energies, new behaviours become apparent. This is why CERN (and its partners) spent the $billions to build the LHC, so they could explore even higher energy levels, in the hope of finding the Higgs particle and dark-matter particles. Enough new behaviour has been found to make them talk about an even larger (and more expensive) ring to smash protons together at even higher energies.

In some respects, for probing the interior of the proton, high-energy electrons make very good "bullets", simply because they have no internal structure. Smashing protons together produces "messier" results because the interior of the target interacts with the interior of the "bullet".

Quote from: jerrygg38
Why is the proton stable?
In simplistic terms, the energy of the three quarks combined into a proton is less than the energy of the three quarks separately. In fact, it is thought that it takes an increasing amount of energy to separate quarks by increasing distances.

An equally important question is "why is the neutron unstable?".
The different triplet of quarks in an isolated neutron spontaneously decays to the three quarks of a proton (plus an electron & neutrino). The energy of the proton+electron+neutrino is less than the energy of the isolated neutron.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the proton stable?
« Reply #3 on: 31/07/2016 23:38:14 »


Quote from: jerrygg38
Why is the proton stable?
In simplistic terms, the energy of the three quarks combined into a proton is less than the energy of the three quarks separately. In fact, it is thought that it takes an increasing amount of energy to separate quarks by increasing distances.

An equally important question is "why is the neutron unstable?".
The different triplet of quarks in an isolated neutron spontaneously decays to the three quarks of a proton (plus an electron & neutrino). The energy of the proton+electron+neutrino is less than the energy of the isolated neutron.
   Seems like a good explanation of the proton stability. So we have to add more energy to break it apart. The way I look at the neutron is if we add energy to the electron in the Bohr orbit and push it toward the proton, we have to achieve a velocity of 0.9186C to reach the proton radius. The Einsteinian energy is then equal to the energy of the neutrino. thus the electron merges into the proton and does not orbit it. However it is very unstable and readily returns to proton, electron, and neutrino.
 

Offline jerrygg38

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Re: Why is the proton stable?
« Reply #4 on: 31/07/2016 23:43:47 »
Wave-particle nature certainly exists for protons! They can diffract, tunnel, and exhibit other quantum behavior, they're just much more massive than electrons, so their wavelengths are much shorter.
  Thanks for the information.
 

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Re: Why is the proton stable?
« Reply #4 on: 31/07/2016 23:43:47 »

 

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