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Author Topic: What are quantum phase transitions?  (Read 944 times)

Online tkadm30

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What are quantum phase transitions?
« on: 03/08/2016 12:16:38 »
Quantum criticality is essential to understanding strongly correlated condensed matter systems. However, can quantum phase transitions in biological systems occurs during synaptic activity?

Consciousness is an evidence of a synaptic phase transition: a macroscopic and coherent entanglement of the mind and brain. 
« Last Edit: 03/08/2016 13:05:52 by tkadm30 »


 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #1 on: 04/08/2016 11:40:09 »
Quote from: tkmadm30
can quantum phase transitions in biological systems occur during synaptic activity?
A phase transition implies that a large number of particles interact via quantum effects, and that these particles change their structure and degree of order based on some external influence.

These quantum phase transitions are defined to exist at absolute zero (-273C). However, synaptic signalling  in humans does not function below 0C. So you would have to say that quantum phase transitions cannot occur in synaptic signalling.

There are examples where quantum effects are thought to occur in biological molecules (eg during photosynthesis). However, you need a large number of molecules in an orderly array for there to be a change in that structure; most biological systems are rather more chaotic, with molecules floating around and bumping into each other all the time...

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_phase_transition

PS: I don't think that the Physics grants committee would be impressed with an application to study the quantum effects of cannabinoids on synaptic signalling...

Quote
Consciousness is an evidence of a synaptic phase transition
Since we really don't know what consciousness is, I suppose this is as good a guess as any...
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #2 on: 04/08/2016 12:09:00 »
These quantum phase transitions are defined to exist at absolute zero (-273C). However, synaptic signalling  in humans does not function below 0C. So you would have to say that quantum phase transitions cannot occur in synaptic signalling.

Do you got a link for this claim?

Quote from: evan_au
PS: I don't think that the Physics grants committee would be impressed with an application to study the quantum effects of cannabinoids on synaptic signalling...

You bet... :-)

I'm mostly interested in understanding how synaptic phase transitions could modulate endocannabinoid signaling.

Perhaps the mecanism of synaptic quantum tunnelling (exocytosis) could allow higher temperatures phase transitions in the brain? Criticality must have evolved as a unique capacity for human brains to compute at higher temperatures.
 
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #3 on: 04/08/2016 12:59:35 »
Phase-transition-driven synaptic exocytosis is an evidence of the brain hypercomputation capacity to use endocannabinoid signaling to neuromodulate consciousness.

The biological mecanism of Synaptic Phase Transition (SPT)  is founded on the emerging neural criticality properties of the brain: Synaptic Hypercomputation (SH) is a continuous phase transition where the criticality of neurocomputational activity can generate new synapses from altered conscious states.   

Self-organized criticality as a fundamental property of neural systems: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnsys.2014.00166/full

Phase-transition-driven synaptic exocytosis: a hypothesis and its physiological and evolutionary implications. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12166829
« Last Edit: 19/10/2016 12:23:21 by tkadm30 »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #4 on: 04/08/2016 22:25:44 »
Quote from: tkadm30
... is a continuous phase transition
A phase transition means that something changes from one state to another (eg gas to liquid, normal conductor to superconductor). When it has transitioned, it stops transitioning - until it comes to a different transition (eg liquid to solid).

A "continuous transition" sounds like something that is changing, but never quite changes - a transition that never transitions.

It sounds like an oxymoron to me.
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #5 on: 04/08/2016 22:41:45 »
A "continuous transition" sounds like something that is changing, but never quite changes - a transition that never transitions.

It sounds like an oxymoron to me.

A "continuous phase transition" is a continuously changing phase.
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #6 on: 04/08/2016 22:44:52 »
Quote from: tkadm30
Quote from: evan_au
synaptic signalling  in humans does not function below 0C.
Do you got a link for this claim?
It is well known that small changes in brain temperature (as little as 23C) affect brain functions and neuronal properties (Hodgkin and Katz, 1949; Ritchie and Straub, 1956; Schiff and Somjen, 1985; Moser et al., 1993). Therefore, heat-sensitive molecular components seem to be essential for brain functions at physiological temperature..

The experiments I saw on warm-blooded creatures don't seem to test neuronal function below about 25C, probably because it becomes dead boring... (normal body temperature is 37C.)
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #7 on: 04/08/2016 22:45:52 »
Quote from: tkadm30
A "continuous phase transition" is a continuously changing phase.
So what is it changing from and to?
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #8 on: 04/08/2016 23:32:07 »
Consciousness is an evidence of a synaptic phase transition: a macroscopic and coherent entanglement of the mind and brain.

Would you care to define "consciousness" and "mind"? The other words have adequately robust meanings to allow for experimental investigation.
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #9 on: 04/08/2016 23:40:47 »
It is well known that small changes in brain temperature (as little as 23C) affect brain functions and neuronal properties (Hodgkin and Katz, 1949; Ritchie and Straub, 1956; Schiff and Somjen, 1985; Moser et al., 1993). Therefore, heat-sensitive molecular components seem to be essential for brain functions at physiological temperature..

The experiments I saw on warm-blooded creatures don't seem to test neuronal function below about 25C, probably because it becomes dead boring... (normal body temperature is 37C.)

I suggest self-organized criticality is a continuous phase transition that emerged in human brains; The capacity to hypercompute at higher temperatures is an evidence of biological phase coherence. 
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #10 on: 05/08/2016 11:29:29 »
Would you care to define "consciousness" and "mind"? The other words have adequately robust meanings to allow for experimental investigation.

Consciousness is the subjective experience of the self: The (computational) mind is the biological capacity for humans to hypercompute non-classical Turing machines.

Synaptic phase transition may occurs continuously during life: Consciousness is a global phase transition where the pharmacological phase of neural criticality is self-organized.
 

Online puppypower

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #11 on: 05/08/2016 11:55:14 »
The phase transitions in life and the brain are connected to the binary system of water and organics. This is similar to water and oil causing two phases. A synapse is composed organic-water-organic, with a water phase defining the gap between the two organic phases; axon and dendrite.

Heating the body will not increase the efficiency of the brain, because our body temperature is optimized to water. Water at 35C defines water's heat capacity minimum. As we increase or decrease temperature from 35C, water absorbs more heat energy, altering the organic phases that will be in equilibrium.

« Last Edit: 05/08/2016 11:59:20 by puppypower »
 

Online tkadm30

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #12 on: 19/10/2016 12:20:39 »
The phase transitions in life and the brain are connected to the binary system of water and organics. This is similar to water and oil causing two phases. A synapse is composed organic-water-organic, with a water phase defining the gap between the two organic phases; axon and dendrite.

Thanks, puppypower. I was looking for the reason synaptic phase transition could be equivalent to water-mediated hypercomputation. Perhaps the coherence phase of consciousness is a global one??
 

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Re: What are quantum phase transitions?
« Reply #12 on: 19/10/2016 12:20:39 »

 

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