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Author Topic: What makes chemistry interesting?  (Read 1080 times)

Offline Ashot

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What makes chemistry interesting?
« on: 03/08/2016 16:53:56 »
Chemistry is an amazing science, the competent knowledge provides an ability to manipulate and transform matter. Chemistry is an absolutely new world of possibilities. However, chemistry is difficult subject to study and it takes allot of motivation and hard work before it becomes a part of your life. I believe the simple and interesting demonstrations of chemistry on practice can be reasonably attractive to people who was never interested in this particular subject before.   
I've recently started a youtube channel, where I am doing all sort of chemistry experiments and demonstrations. So far I have uploaded only 4 videos and I believe I still have much work to do before my videos will be somewhat interesting.
However, for me to become better I need to hear opinions and perhaps some advice.
So please if you have time check out my videos and let me know what you guys think.

1. In this video, I am doing "Life hacks" not really these life hacks very unlikely will come useful in 21st century but who knows.
this video divided into 3 parts.
*Cooling a can of a soft drink using endothermic reaction.
*Making Marquis reagent (identification of most alkaloids)
*Medical source of oxygen by catalytic decomposition of H2O2
 

2. In this video, I am determining which brewage contains more caffeine (tea or instant coffee)
I am extracting caffeine from the equivalent amount of tea and coffee by mass using organic solvent extraction method.

3. In this video, I am transforming AA battery to a world's known medication.
Lithium metal obtained from the specific lithium battery, then this metal is reacted further to lithium carbonate (used in the treatment of bipolar disorder).

4. This video is part 2  of the transformation of AA battery to medication.
In this video, I am letting nature do the reaction by leaving lithium metal exposed to air.
I've managed to improve video quality also I've experimented with time-lapse video.
Also, I've included the demonstration at the end of this video, what's going to happen if too much lithium metal is placed in water at once (Dangerous experiment) 

I hope you will enjoy watching my videos, also please let me know what you guys think.
Every opinion is of a big value for me.
« Last Edit: 03/08/2016 22:36:16 by Ashot »


 

Offline Ashot

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Re: Demonstrations of random chemistry.
« Reply #1 on: 03/08/2016 17:00:46 »
Oh didn't realize external links can't be posted here sorry
you can find me on youtube - /channel/UCFJ9VmME1Y2Cj3MCnv2kjeQ 
 

Offline Janechem

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #2 on: 05/08/2016 08:08:13 »
What you are doing will make more people know what is chemistry and what chemistry can be used to achieve. That's great. After watching the video you put on Youtube, being serious is one of the aspects that you should overcome I think. That's to say, the video is showing and teaching, but it needs to interesting to attract people and make them want to check back for new episodes. There are a lot of examples you can check on the internet from several big chemistry companies.

Then crystallization is the very first chemistry phenomenon that attract me to chemistry. Now I'm learning on this subject as it plays an important role in purifying pharmaceutical impurities (BOC Sciences). Hope you can share something in this aspect.
 

Offline Ashot

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #3 on: 06/08/2016 17:22:40 »
Hi, what a coincident, I just recently posted a video where salicylic acid is crystalizing in water. It's not very educational it's rather a visual demonstration. Thanks for your comment, and you are right I need to make videos a little more interesting.
 

Offline Ashot

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #4 on: 10/08/2016 02:04:05 »
I've uploaded a new video, where I am removing rust from a very old tool in several minutes.
 

Offline William McC

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #5 on: 18/08/2016 04:12:19 »
Have you ever used Muriatic acid pure HCL instead of HCL solution?

You no longer get the orange run off.


Which makes me suspect that rust is an oxidation. Oxidized iron is blue to my knowledge. If you use straight HCL, for one be very careful, but take a look at the metal after it is reclaimed, it looks pale blue.

I have seen ferric chloride solution that looks like rusty water, eat away at brass, like running water eats away at ice. The substance acts just like rust acts when rust gets wet. It looks like rust if left on iron to dry. They use it in etching processes.

This is something interesting and may lead to a better understanding of how things corrode. A few iron nails left by a roofer on a building, will cause rain water run off to carry rust with it. This rusty run off, can cause the finest marine stainless and even inconel to get rusty blemishes upon. Now we know that the stainless oxidizes on the surface with great vigor. Apparently the rusty iron when splashed upon the stainless steel or inconel will be reclaimed by the oxides in the stainless steels surface. Over time enough iron builds up on the surface and it will then start to rust and corrode the stainless steel. Which I believe is a chlorination process. If you have ever smelled chlorine, compare that to the smell of damp rust. 

I have never seen a process that oxidizes iron, cause it to turn orange. In fact years ago we used to use many different acids that almost always oxidize, to clean iron and other metals of chloride based corrosion.

They use steam to mass clean files that are rusted and worn commercially. Steam can also be used to remove rust from iron.

Sodium hydroxide and steam makes a superior rust remover, it removes grease, oil and rust, however I can see the argument that the sodium in the sodium hydroxide is hungry for oxygen. However I believe that it is the solid sodium hydroxide that is hungry for oxygen not the solution of sodium hydroxide. Just some things to think about and experiment about.

Sincerely,

William McCormick



 
 

Offline William McC

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #6 on: 18/08/2016 04:36:21 »
Hi, what a coincident, I just recently posted a video where salicylic acid is crystalizing in water. It's not very educational it's rather a visual demonstration. Thanks for your comment, and you are right I need to make videos a little more interesting.

You can crystalize any solution to my knowledge using over saturation of a solution. Like they do to make rock candy or string candy as some call it. The string being part of the manufacturing process and the final product. You can also use it to remove salt from salt water. By adding in more and more salt to a heated solution, until no more salt will be absorbed. Then let it cool without bothering it. Over time a large single crystal will form, and almost pure water will surround it.

Sincerely,

William McCormick

 

Offline William McC

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #7 on: 18/08/2016 04:37:55 »
The best solution to try crystallization upon is copper sulfate. A large single blue crystal will be surrounded by clear water. Visually very pleasing.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

Offline Janechem

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #8 on: 30/08/2016 10:51:37 »
It reminds me of the Ads of Estee Lauder-What makes women beautiful? hahaha  forgive me for being off the point.
 

Offline William McC

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #9 on: 05/09/2016 02:19:29 »
Also consider that by adding either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid to a used weakend ferric chloride solution, that both acids strengthen the ferric chloride solution. The nitric acid drops the iron or other metals out of solution with the ferric chloride, by oxidizing them back to a metal like substance, that can be filtered or removed. The hydrochloric acid, just strengthens the ferric chloride solution. The method using nitric acid I believe is preferred.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

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Re: What makes chemistry interesting?
« Reply #9 on: 05/09/2016 02:19:29 »

 

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