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Author Topic: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?  (Read 6476 times)

Offline Thebox

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Re: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?
« Reply #200 on: 05/09/2016 09:50:36 »
Hello!  You all seem to be off track, light IS the frame of reference, nothing to do with the speed either, the inverse square law relative to the size of mass dictates the length of a visual universe and reference frame whole.
Have you  never sat in a field at night that is really dark with a small amount of illumination such as a candle, your universal reference frame becomes really small.



 

Offline Thebox

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Re: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?
« Reply #201 on: 05/09/2016 10:08:53 »
I drew it you to save me some time in discussion.





 

Offline PhysBang

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Re: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?
« Reply #202 on: 05/09/2016 13:42:36 »
This is the fitting end to this thread and I am done with this forum forever.
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?
« Reply #203 on: 05/09/2016 19:34:40 »
I've added another set of example objects to the reference-frame camera program to give a few hints of what happens with a rotating disc. Click on "load example objects" and select the new set by typing in "d". If you're using a machine with a keyboard, you can switch between four pre-programmed frames using the number keys 1 to 4 and use "s" and "d" to start/stop the action and change the direction in which it runs time.

( www.magicschoolbook.com/science/ref-frame-camera ).

The red and yellow objects are long rectangles, all length-contracted to half their rest length when you first see them. Once you view them from the other frames you can see how they would look if the disc was moving through space at relativistic speed, and you can get a good idea from this of how the red and yellow objects would behave if they were going round the blue disc rather than merely passing it on tangents. Notice how the width of the moving shapes always matches up with the width of the blue shapes where the moving ones touch the edge of the disc, so a rotating disc will length-contract to exactly the same extent as a non-rotating one (thereby resolving the issues I presented in post #1).

I didn't know how time would behave in the program, but it's clear now that it's written - when you change from the preferred frame to extreme frames you see objects moving across the screen more quickly, and the reason for this is that time is still being run by the preferred frame and the action for objects at rest in the preferred frame don't show up as running slow. If you click on "reset" and then load example objects "a", switch between frames 1 and 2 and watch the progress of the red shape, then switch between frames 1 and 3 and watch the progress of the green shape - in each case they progress at the same speed up/along the screen while the other one (the green or the red) jumps and changes speed. The objects that jump and move faster when you change frame are showing what they will do far in the future of frame 1's time, so they're showing action that hasn't happened yet, and they show that future action running at a faster rate too.
« Last Edit: 05/09/2016 21:07:56 by David Cooper »
 

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Re: Can a preferred frame of reference be identified?
« Reply #203 on: 05/09/2016 19:34:40 »

 

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