The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Does a contraction of light change the wood?  (Read 633 times)

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3153
  • Thanked: 44 times
    • View Profile
Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« on: 05/08/2016 08:10:47 »
We start with a length of wood, we measure the length of the wood with a piece of string, we then change the string to a length of space and a length of light in that space, however the measurement is always of the length of wood, so if in our final measurement the length of light contracted in the length of space, does this affect the length of wood?


 

Offline Colin2B

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1906
  • Thanked: 122 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #1 on: 05/08/2016 09:06:59 »
If space contracted then yes the length of the wood would contract. If by length of light you mean the number of wavelengths equivalent to the lean got of the wood,, then again that length would change.
However, if you were next to the wood your ruler would also have contracted so you would never know anything had changed.
Can't see the wood for the trees especially in a dark wood with no light!
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3153
  • Thanked: 44 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #2 on: 05/08/2016 16:09:59 »
If space contracted then yes the length of the wood would contract. If by length of light you mean the number of wavelengths equivalent to the lean got of the wood,, then again that length would change.
However, if you were next to the wood your ruler would also have contracted so you would never know anything had changed.
Can't see the wood for the trees especially in a dark wood with no light!


If space contracted? what do you mean space contracted?  what of space suppose to contract?



My piece of wood is 0.288 miles a second,

My piece of string is 0.288 miles a second,

My ''length'' of light is 0.288 miles a second

 

Offline Bill S

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1802
  • Thanked: 11 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #3 on: 05/08/2016 21:47:24 »
Quote from: TB
If space contracted? what do you mean space contracted?  what of space suppose to contract?

Do you accept that the Universe is expanding, to the extent that the space between galaxy groups is growing?

If so, do you consider that this expansion involves the galaxy groups moving through space?
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3153
  • Thanked: 44 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #4 on: 06/08/2016 07:28:38 »
Quote from: TB
If space contracted? what do you mean space contracted?  what of space suppose to contract?

Do you accept that the Universe is expanding, to the extent that the space between galaxy groups is growing?

If so, do you consider that this expansion involves the galaxy groups moving through space?


I accept the galaxies are moving away from us because present information says so and I have no personal way to discourse this or contest this.   Yes Galaxies move through space into more space.   However the red shift of light shows us a red shift and contraction of light, it must contract to form spectral red content, it does not show space is expanding. For something to contract there has to be two applied forces, a push force and a push back force, so I do not understand how something moving away can push back.
Presently dark energy is mentioned for the ''expansion'' . however we can interpret light energy to be dark energy the same has dark lightning, dark interpreted as invisible, we can not see the light that travels through space, it is invisible , a ''dark'' energy.
So I think interpretation is the key to understanding just about everything.

Am I correct in thinking that +hf = > 4/3 pi r of the object?

And in reverse -hf = <4/3 pi r of the object after expansion?





« Last Edit: 06/08/2016 08:02:59 by Thebox »
 

Offline evan_au

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4091
  • Thanked: 243 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #5 on: 06/08/2016 09:24:16 »
Quote from: TheBox
My piece of wood is 0.288 miles a second,
My piece of string is 0.288 miles a second,
My ''length'' of light is 0.288 miles a second
A mile is a measure of length.
Miles per second is not a measure of length, it is a measure of speed.

Your piece of wood (and the string being used to measure it) can be traveling at a speed of 0.288 miles per second, but this speed is almost nothing compared to the speed of light, so no length contraction could be measured.

Light in a vacuum can never travel at 0.288 miles per second, when you measure it in your lab.
 

Offline Thebox

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3153
  • Thanked: 44 times
    • View Profile
Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #6 on: 06/08/2016 21:39:46 »
Quote from: TheBox

Light in a vacuum can never travel at 0.288 miles per second, when you measure it in your lab.

I never said it could , but what does travel at 0.288 mile per second approximately is the Earth's rotation at 1035 mph at the equator.

If the Earth was to rotate at the speed of light I am quite sure the obloid type shape of the Earth would become a ''flat'' disk. There would be a super-massive centripetal force.

You mention light, I asked what of space contracts ?  there is no recognised aether etc, it is not substance like, so what of space contracts?

A bit crossed from the other thread but does this contract  μ0?

 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Does a contraction of light change the wood?
« Reply #6 on: 06/08/2016 21:39:46 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums