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Author Topic: Could dark energy be negative mass?  (Read 404 times)

Online jeffreyH

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Could dark energy be negative mass?
« on: 14/08/2016 16:47:40 »
Ok What I mean by negative mass is mass that no longer interacts with the universe for whatever reason. Maybe it has fallen into a black hole or now exists only as virtual particles in the vacuum. I prefer the vacuum idea since applying the idea to black holes wouldn't sit well with observations of galaxy rotation. Since the repulsion of dark energy would likely cancel the effect of dark matter.

So in the intergalactic 'voids' could some process be removing mass from the universe?


 

Offline PmbPhy

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Re: Could dark energy be negative mass?
« Reply #1 on: 15/08/2016 02:23:57 »
Ok What I mean by negative mass is mass that no longer interacts with the universe for whatever reason. Maybe it has fallen into a black hole or now exists only as virtual particles in the vacuum. I prefer the vacuum idea since applying the idea to black holes wouldn't sit well with observations of galaxy rotation. Since the repulsion of dark energy would likely cancel the effect of dark matter.

So in the intergalactic 'voids' could some process be removing mass from the universe?
To respond to the question in the subject like, yes. It's quite possible that dark energy is negative mass. In effect dark energy actually does behave like negative mass. In fact if the source of dark energy is negative pressure then the active gravitational mass will be negative, so in that case you're right.
 
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Re: Could dark energy be negative mass?
« Reply #1 on: 15/08/2016 02:23:57 »

 

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