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Author Topic: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?  (Read 6117 times)

Offline pzkpfw

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #150 on: 12/09/2016 23:34:37 »
Of course you see a red dot on the wall but you do  not see a reflective beam if you add smoke to the room, you only see the incident ray of the beam. Fact.

You are mixing things up; of course we don't see the beam itself, as it travels through your "gin clear" air, unless there's smoke or something in the room.

But that red dot on the wall is diffuse reflection of the light of the laser.

(That's good evidence that we don't see light that's distant, we see light that gets to our eyes.)

What was your point in this bit anyway?

No magic involved it is see through

Until you can somehow explain or prove why "see through" gives "instant vision" - it remains magic.

Now you are understanding , the air is see through, the light passing through that air that is not in your eyes, not entered your eyes is see through, you do not see light in space because it is not compressing.

Aside from degenerating back into gibberish, you are contradicting yourself here. Earlier you talk about seeing light that hasn't reached our eyes, now you talk about not seeing light in space.

You can't keep your story straight.

Connectivity

Your "Connectivity" is magic until explained. So far, it seems to be akin to telepathy opr something. Magic.

Now go back and consider measuring where a shadow is, consider if  you did not see light in space it would be dark space like a shadow.

No. We see light when it reaches our eyes. Shadow is simply an area where none (or less) light comes from to reach our eyes.

The sun lights a field, the grass sends light to our eyes. A tree blocks some of that sunlight hitting the field, we "see" the shadow on the grass because that area is sending less light to our eyes. So very simple. The perfect shape of the tree on the grass is wonderful proof of how shadows are created.

In space, you could have a billion laser pointers sending light passing right in front of you, and you'd still be in darkness if none of that light is reaching your eyes (reflected off dust or something). Vision is simply about light getting to your eyes.

It's not magic.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #151 on: 13/09/2016 00:40:11 »
Of course you see a red dot on the wall but you do  not see a reflective beam if you add smoke to the room, you only see the incident ray of the beam. Fact.

You are mixing things up; of course we don't see the beam itself, as it travels through your "gin clear" air, unless there's smoke or something in the room.

But that red dot on the wall is diffuse reflection of the light of the laser.

(That's good evidence that we don't see light that's distant, we see light that gets to our eyes.)

What was your point in this bit anyway?

No magic involved it is see through

Until you can somehow explain or prove why "see through" gives "instant vision" - it remains magic.

Now you are understanding , the air is see through, the light passing through that air that is not in your eyes, not entered your eyes is see through, you do not see light in space because it is not compressing.

Aside from degenerating back into gibberish, you are contradicting yourself here. Earlier you talk about seeing light that hasn't reached our eyes, now you talk about not seeing light in space.

You can't keep your story straight.

Connectivity

Your "Connectivity" is magic until explained. So far, it seems to be akin to telepathy opr something. Magic.

Now go back and consider measuring where a shadow is, consider if  you did not see light in space it would be dark space like a shadow.

No. We see light when it reaches our eyes. Shadow is simply an area where none (or less) light comes from to reach our eyes.

The sun lights a field, the grass sends light to our eyes. A tree blocks some of that sunlight hitting the field, we "see" the shadow on the grass because that area is sending less light to our eyes. So very simple. The perfect shape of the tree on the grass is wonderful proof of how shadows are created.

In space, you could have a billion laser pointers sending light passing right in front of you, and you'd still be in darkness if none of that light is reaching your eyes (reflected off dust or something). Vision is simply about light getting to your eyes.

It's not magic.
ok, let us mix this up a bit more,

You have an empty bottle underwater with a lid on it , you take off the lid,  what happens to the water.?
To save time , the water floods into the bottle but remains connected to the whole.


Now underwater look with your eyes , can you see water that is a few feet away ?  Unlike air I have now give you a visual. Just like you can see the water that is a few feet away,  you can see the light passing through that water that is a few feet away .
« Last Edit: 13/09/2016 00:51:10 by Thebox »
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #152 on: 13/09/2016 00:51:18 »
Your problem is you are eager to "mix it up" in order to deflect away from the main topic. A defense mechanism. When you are challenged and have no logical answer.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #153 on: 13/09/2016 00:54:27 »
Your problem is you are eager to "mix it up" in order to deflect away from the main topic. A defense mechanism. When you are challenged and have no logical answer.

I am not deflected away at all, I am trying to get you to see it from my position, we see light that as not entered our eyes, consider the water
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #154 on: 13/09/2016 00:56:48 »
Take it from me, you are wrong.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #155 on: 13/09/2016 01:01:24 »
Take it from me, you are wrong.
A  simple question Jeff,  when underwater can you see water that is a distance away ?
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #156 on: 13/09/2016 01:04:58 »
I'm not interested in discussing science with you anymore.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #157 on: 13/09/2016 01:06:50 »
I'm not interested in discussing science with you anymore.
well Jeff,  perhaps you do not want to understand or even try to understand.

You forget I know your information
« Last Edit: 13/09/2016 01:09:53 by Thebox »
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #158 on: 13/09/2016 01:46:49 »
I'm not interested in discussing science with you anymore.
well Jeff,  perhaps you do not want to understand or even try to understand.

You forget I know your information

And by that you mean what exactly?
 

Offline pzkpfw

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #159 on: 13/09/2016 02:01:36 »
... Now underwater look with your eyes , can you see water that is a few feet away ?  Unlike air I have now give you a visual. Just like you can see the water that is a few feet away,  you can see the light passing through that water that is a few feet away .

No.

If the water is perfectly clear, I won't be seeing it, I'll be seeing light that has passed through it; so (for example) I'd be seeing light that left the other side of the swimming pool and travels to my eye.

If the water isn't perfectly clear, e.g. it has some dirt swirling in it, I'll be seeing light reflected (absorbed/re-emitted) by that dirt. Similar to being able to see a laser beam in a smokey room.
 

Offline William McC

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #160 on: 13/09/2016 03:53:06 »
If the beam of light from the rocket, is turned off when it reaches point B an observer at point A will instantly see the light go off eight minutes after the rocket departs. The clock aboard the ship if mechanical, and shielded by multiple walls of steel, will show 8 minutes have passed. 

Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #161 on: 13/09/2016 04:01:32 »
If the beam of light from the rocket, is turned off when it reaches point B an observer at point A will instantly see the light go off eight minutes after the rocket departs. The clock aboard the ship if mechanical, and shielded by multiple walls of steel, will show 8 minutes have passed. 

Sincerely,

William McCormick
yes , except there is no actual beam ,
« Last Edit: 13/09/2016 04:16:04 by Thebox »
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #162 on: 13/09/2016 04:03:01 »
... Now underwater look with your eyes , can you see water that is a few feet away ?  Unlike air I have now give you a visual. Just like you can see the water that is a few feet away,  you can see the light passing through that water that is a few feet away .

No.

If the water is perfectly clear, I won't be seeing it, I'll be seeing light that has passed through it; so (for example) I'd be seeing light that left the other side of the swimming pool and travels to my eye.

If the water isn't perfectly clear, e.g. it has some dirt swirling in it, I'll be seeing light reflected (absorbed/re-emitted) by that dirt. Similar to being able to see a laser beam in a smokey room.
it does not matter the water is clear you can still see the water , look from above ,out of the water if needed
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #163 on: 13/09/2016 04:07:36 »
I'm not interested in discussing science with you anymore.
well Jeff,  perhaps you do not want to understand or even try to understand.

You forget I know your information

And by that you mean what exactly?
it means you defend present information in a new theories section rather than considering the theory. It  also means I know already what you think and I know the thinking is maybe flawed, however you don't want to look for flaws in present information, you accept without contesting the information , I contest the information by observered objective information ,
 

Offline William McC

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #164 on: 13/09/2016 06:04:47 »
If the beam of light from the rocket, is turned off when it reaches point B an observer at point A will instantly see the light go off eight minutes after the rocket departs. The clock aboard the ship if mechanical, and shielded by multiple walls of steel, will show 8 minutes have passed. 

Sincerely,

William McCormick
yes , except there is no actual beam ,

Light is a slow down of high velocity ambient radiation. The source no matter the velocity of the source creating light, will create light. The rays that create light are instantaneous. The development of the actual light beam takes some time. The light beam because it is initiated upon take off from point A will remain on and visible at all times to point A.

The velocity of the craft is not a factor at all.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

Offline pzkpfw

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #165 on: 13/09/2016 06:16:50 »
it does not matter the water is clear you can still see the water , look from above ,out of the water if needed

That's because water isn't actually perfectly clear (as you would say - it's not "gin clear"). What you are seeing, is light affected by that water, coming to your eyes.


How about telling me how time-of-flight laser range finders work.

Is it mere coincidence that they give correct answers, while operating by some principal that you would deny?
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #166 on: 13/09/2016 07:28:17 »
If the beam of light from the rocket, is turned off when it reaches point B an observer at point A will instantly see the light go off eight minutes after the rocket departs. The clock aboard the ship if mechanical, and shielded by multiple walls of steel, will show 8 minutes have passed. 

Sincerely,

William McCormick
yes , except there is no actual beam ,

Light is a slow down of high velocity ambient radiation. The source no matter the velocity of the source creating light, will create light. The rays that create light are instantaneous. The development of the actual light beam takes some time. The light beam because it is initiated upon take off from point A will remain on and visible at all times to point A.

The velocity of the craft is not a factor at all.

Sincerely,

William McCormick


Yes and yes the velocity of the craft is not a factor.   
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #167 on: 13/09/2016 07:29:59 »
it does not matter the water is clear you can still see the water , look from above ,out of the water if needed

That's because water isn't actually perfectly clear (as you would say - it's not "gin clear"). What you are seeing, is light affected by that water, coming to your eyes.


How about telling me how time-of-flight laser range finders work.

Is it mere coincidence that they give correct answers, while operating by some principal that you would deny?

A laser is a beam  passing through the constant.
 

Offline pzkpfw

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #168 on: 13/09/2016 07:51:48 »
A laser is a beam  passing through the constant.

My hovercraft is full of eels.
 

Offline Thebox

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #169 on: 13/09/2016 07:55:13 »
A laser is a beam  passing through the constant.

My hovercraft is full of eels.
Well, I think William understands, I think William may ''see'' the contradiction.

Added - Graph for William

added- considering my graph the speed of light would be measured to be the same as the speed of the craft if we considered the tip end of light was at the craft end?  huh............

Maybe the tip of the light ''stops'' when obstructed.hmmm


« Last Edit: 13/09/2016 18:29:18 by Thebox »
 

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Re: What time does the rocket arrive at point B?
« Reply #169 on: 13/09/2016 07:55:13 »

 

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