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Author Topic: What compound would give a piece of wood super strength and flexibility?  (Read 477 times)

Offline thedoc

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Dermod Judge asked the Naked Scientists:
   I'm writing a futuristic thriller abut the Irish sport hurling and I want to 'create' a futuristic hurley, not made from the traditional ash but from some compound that has great flexibility and strength, a memory of the physique of the player for which it was made and other powerful attributes. Where would I start to research the likely ingredients. All chemical websites seem to be comprehensible only to chemists. Dermod Judge
What do you think?
« Last Edit: 01/09/2016 11:23:01 by _system »


 

Offline Colin2B

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You might start by thinking what ideal characteristics the materials would need to have and then serch for something close. You are really looking for the mechanical properties first rather than the chemistry.
As an example, you could look at the construction of compound bows used by Mongolian horse archers. They used bone for the side in compression and sinews for the side in tension, the 2 sides being bonded together. This made a powerful bow with short arms. They understood the mechanics but I doubt they understood the chemistry.
 

Offline evan_au

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How about "smart" graphene, with built-in computer control?
- When instructed by the computer, the graphene layers can slide smoothly over each other, to mold into new shapes (like the grip of their player, or a custom head shape for the shot that the player is about to take)
- When instructed by the computer, the layers lock together to form a strong and rigid shape
 

Online jeffreyH

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How about "smart" graphene, with built-in computer control?
- When instructed by the computer, the graphene layers can slide smoothly over each other, to mold into new shapes (like the grip of their player, or a custom head shape for the shot that the player is about to take)
- When instructed by the computer, the layers lock together to form a strong and rigid shape

You don't work for Skynet by any chance do you Evan?
 

Offline William McC

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You might start by thinking what ideal characteristics the materials would need to have and then serch for something close. You are really looking for the mechanical properties first rather than the chemistry.
As an example, you could look at the construction of compound bows used by Mongolian horse archers. They used bone for the side in compression and sinews for the side in tension, the 2 sides being bonded together. This made a powerful bow with short arms. They understood the mechanics but I doubt they understood the chemistry.


Resorcinol water proof adhesives create a plywood that is pretty amazing ounce for ounce. I have seen the adhesive last more than 25 years without care to the wood that was in the water 75 percent of that time. It takes abuse and it is very strong.

https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=iJ94n7GHuUAC&source=productsearch&utm_source=HA_Desktop_US&utm_medium=SEM&utm_campaign=PLA&pcampaignid=MKTAD0930BO1&gl=US&gclid=CKDiucaD984CFRDWNwodqZkIug&gclsrc=ds


Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

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