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Author Topic: Can lavender Potassium Permanganate be used as a radiation antidote?  (Read 2681 times)

Offline William McC

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If you agree there is nothing negative about a particle of electricity, then it should not be labeled with a (-) symbol. That labeling makes as much sense as raise it down and lower it up.

Stubborn egotistical colleges cannot repair their errors. Especially after they insulted a dead mans work by saying he could not have known the direction of electricity, and took a guess about the polarity of electricity. When in fact colleges took a guess or purposely mislabeled electricity. Benjamin Franklin created the test in his basement with a wire from his roof during a lightning storm. Using a pointed and flat electrode which shows the direction of electricity. 

You asked how can you make a computer without understanding electricity? You do not even need electricity to make a computer. First you need to understand the computer then electricity, then make the computer. It looks like neither is understood yet. 

As I mentioned after a few years of kids learning in school and calling the sky purple we would believe the sky was purple. That is what has happened with electricity. The problem is that we did not change up to down and down to up, positive to mean negative and negative to mean positive across the board yet. So perhaps we can just fix the labeling on electricity and move on. Then we can fix chemistry and science. Since we live in a universe built solely out of particles of electricity according to my schooling, I would think we should get that in order before doing anything important. Our computers are barely, reliable. I am not saying that they are not complex, and often fun and useful however they are unnecessarily complex in most cases. Unstable in all cases.

Sincerely,

William McCormick

 
You seem to have given up any attempt at sense.

perhaps you could explain who a tiny trace of permanganate holds together a huge amount of water in a crystal.

I was surprised at how little copper sulfate it took to oversaturate the solution. And I was even more surprised by the huge crystal I saw the next morning in class when I went to examine the experiment. So I am keeping an open mind about the potassium permanganate. I expect to see a purple crystal in pristine water. That when broken up will produce lavender crystals.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
 

Offline Bored chemist

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I was surprised at how little copper sulfate it took to oversaturate the solution. And I was even more surprised by the huge crystal I saw the next morning in class when I went to examine the experiment. So I am keeping an open mind about the potassium permanganate. I expect to see a purple crystal in pristine water. That when broken up will produce lavender crystals.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
As I said, reality and this thread have clearly parted company.
You seem to say that it takes a little copper sulphate to make a saturated solution- but you get a lot of copper sulphate back from that solution.
Where does the additional copper sulphate come from? Do unicorns bring it?
Also re "I expect to see a purple crystal in pristine water."
How?
If I put a little permanganate into water I get a very dark solution. I can then add more to get a saturated solution. I can even look up in tables like this
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
how much permanganate will dissolve.  Near room temperature it will be about 4 or 5 %.

If I leave it and let the water evaporate (or if I started with a hot solution and let it cool) then I will end up with fresh crystals of permanganate.
And they will be in water.
And-if by some magic- that water was "pristine"- rather than nearly black with permanganate then they would dissolve.

There's a massive issue with your idea of "pristine"  or  "pure clear water with no blue tint" (for copper sulphate).

How does it know which to do?
How does the water know that- because the crystals are forming- the water should be pure, but when they are dissolving it should dissolve 4% or so?

Are you invoking some insane suggestion that the water has a memory- or that it mystically knows whether you are making crystals or making a solution?
In particular, how do the bits of the solution on the other side of the beaker "know"? What communication method could they use?

So, as I said, you have completely left reality behind in an attempt to avoid admitting that you were simply mistaken.
Meanwhile, back at the topic,
Perhaps you could explain who a tiny trace of permanganate holds together a huge amount of water in a crystal.

(BTW, powdered potassium permanganate is practically black. I used to make lots of it when I was a kid. I imagine you can guess why but it's not a topic to discuss here since it's neither relevant, nor safe)
 

Offline William McC

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I was surprised at how little copper sulfate it took to oversaturate the solution. And I was even more surprised by the huge crystal I saw the next morning in class when I went to examine the experiment. So I am keeping an open mind about the potassium permanganate. I expect to see a purple crystal in pristine water. That when broken up will produce lavender crystals.

Sincerely,

William McCormick
As I said, reality and this thread have clearly parted company.
You seem to say that it takes a little copper sulphate to make a saturated solution- but you get a lot of copper sulphate back from that solution.
Where does the additional copper sulphate come from? Do unicorns bring it?
Also re "I expect to see a purple crystal in pristine water."
How?
If I put a little permanganate into water I get a very dark solution. I can then add more to get a saturated solution. I can even look up in tables like this
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
how much permanganate will dissolve.  Near room temperature it will be about 4 or 5 %.

If I leave it and let the water evaporate (or if I started with a hot solution and let it cool) then I will end up with fresh crystals of permanganate.
And they will be in water.
And-if by some magic- that water was "pristine"- rather than nearly black with permanganate then they would dissolve.

There's a massive issue with your idea of "pristine"  or  "pure clear water with no blue tint" (for copper sulphate).

How does it know which to do?
How does the water know that- because the crystals are forming- the water should be pure, but when they are dissolving it should dissolve 4% or so?

Are you invoking some insane suggestion that the water has a memory- or that it mystically knows whether you are making crystals or making a solution?
In particular, how do the bits of the solution on the other side of the beaker "know"? What communication method could they use?

So, as I said, you have completely left reality behind in an attempt to avoid admitting that you were simply mistaken.
Meanwhile, back at the topic,
Perhaps you could explain who a tiny trace of permanganate holds together a huge amount of water in a crystal.

(BTW, powdered potassium permanganate is practically black. I used to make lots of it when I was a kid. I imagine you can guess why but it's not a topic to discuss here since it's neither relevant, nor safe)

I agree with your logic entirely, about the pristine water, and blue crystal sitting in the pristine water. It made no sense to me either. However the teacher said that when crystallization occurs, with more than enough water present, that the hydrate wishes no more water and stays apart from the water. If you crush it up it will then mix with water again. However the initial reaction leaves the huge single crystal and pristine water not wanting any part of one another. I know the teacher left the classroom windows open the heat off in the fall and asked the janitor to also do the same. I believe he was going for that 40 degree Fahrenheit maximum density of water, and a slow cool over night to cause crystallization. It was cold in the classroom the next morning.

I march to the trumpets that never sound retreat, so I stay on something until I have proof for myself. I am waiting patiently for my beakers to come. The effect and mental picture of the blue crystal in pristine water inside that clear beaker, makes for such memory. I cannot get that picture out of my mind, I am actually very excited about this experiment. I might do the copper sulphate first, and then experiment with the potassium permanganate second. The camera I wish to use is getting old and the lithium batteries are getting old too. So I do not know if I will be able to capture it on time lapse. But I will try. Worse comes to worse I will get some pictures.

I was looking at time lapse apps for the iPhone 7 just incase, but I am not sure if they will do what I wish to do. I am thinking a picture every 2 minutes. I am going to look into those apps now.

My teacher took great care in the temperature of the solution, the amount of copper sulphate mixed into the solution. He knew it would take over night to crystalize. He said it had to be left alone and not bothered, over night. As soon as we finished mixing it, he had us all back away from it and he locked up the classroom.

Sincerely,

William McCormick

 

Offline Bored chemist

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Never mind what you think you remember about what the teacher said. Put some copper sulphate in water and try it.
Or just look on the web where a zillion people have done the experiment.
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-grow-great-crystals/step3/Growing-the-Copper-sulphate-crystal/

Don't you understand that when something is logically impossible, it doesn't happen- so you must have got something wrong?

 

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