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Author Topic: Is A Black Hole Three Dimensional ? If Not............. Then What ?  (Read 190 times)

Offline neilep

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I'm confEWEsed !!


When ewe approach a star or a planet ewe can tell that it's a 3D object yes ?, but what about a black hole ?

Above, below, in front and behind does it all look precisely the same ?....if so...then would an observer lets say approaching the black hole from one direction be seen by another observer who is completely opposite ?
 
whajafink ?


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« Last Edit: 21/09/2016 21:46:26 by neilep »


 

Offline evan_au

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Quote from: neilep
would an observer lets say approaching the black hole from one direction be seen by another observer who is completely opposite ?
One of the many unusual things attempted in the movie "interstellar" was to produce a realistic-looking image of a black hole (starts at about the 45 second point).


(If it doesn't play, try www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdSz12Glhlw )
One thing it showed is that light from objects beyond the black hole are bent so they travel around the event horizon - so you could see someone approaching a black hole from the opposite direction.

However, if the black hole had an accretion disk, the hot, dense plasma is opaque to visible light, and in fact radiates considerable light itself, so the accretion disk would interfere with your lookout for approaching sheep-stealers.

Quote
When ewe approach a star or a planet ewe can tell that it's a 3D object yes ?, but what about a black hole ?
You can't see a stellar-mass black hole itself, because the event horizon is black.
- If a black hole has an accretion disk, this represents a very bright beacon outlining the black hole at visible and X-Ray wavelengths.
- Without an accretion disk, the distortion of the background star field would also outline the black hole.
- Away from visible stars, monitoring the relative motions of a swarm of small spacecraft would be able to identify the location, mass, and even angular mementum of a black hole.

But a black hole is a very small object, perhaps 10km across, so you would need to get very close to see it - or observe the motions of nearby planets and asteroids over a long period of time to detect it.
« Last Edit: 21/09/2016 22:42:23 by evan_au »
 

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