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Author Topic: How can time be a dimension?  (Read 765 times)

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #25 on: 01/10/2016 00:36:24 »
Quote from: Atkhenaken
The clock being a device which mimics the rotation of a planet.
The reference clock used for scientific purposes is an atomic clock, which does not involve rotation, and is not directly related to the rotation of a particular planet.

Note - one second as 9,192,631,770 vibrations of a Cesium 133 atom in a vacuum.

Note -  for something to vibrate it requires a rotation or spin action as the source. Nice try though!
That's simply not true.


I presume you have been too busy being wrong at the top of your voice to actually study any science.
That explains why you don't understand it and that, in turn, explains why you think it's wrong.

It doesn't matter much- science still works, even if you don't believe in it.
 

Offline Atkhenaken

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #26 on: 01/10/2016 02:08:57 »
The proof is in the pudding. Space /time theory has borne no fruit.
That's simply not true.
Does your GPS work?
It relies on space-time.

I presume you have been too busy being wrong at the top of your voice to actually study any science.
That explains why you don't understand it and that, in turn, explains why you think it's wrong.

It doesn't matter much- science still works, even if you don't believe in it.


The operation of a GPS system can be equally validated and explained using my theory. A lack of aetheric pressure on the clock mechanism accounts for the clock ticking faster in space. Note - The clocks are slowed down before the satellite is launched.
Note - Satellites use a 6-12 point average system. Thus, they are not as accurate as they tell you they are. 
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #27 on: 01/10/2016 11:34:21 »
The proof is in the pudding. Space /time theory has borne no fruit.
That's simply not true.
Does your GPS work?
It relies on space-time.

I presume you have been too busy being wrong at the top of your voice to actually study any science.
That explains why you don't understand it and that, in turn, explains why you think it's wrong.

It doesn't matter much- science still works, even if you don't believe in it.


The operation of a GPS system can be equally validated and explained using my theory. A lack of aetheric pressure on the clock mechanism accounts for the clock ticking faster in space. Note - The clocks are slowed down before the satellite is launched.
Note - Satellites use a 6-12 point average system. Thus, they are not as accurate as they tell you they are.

Even if it is true that they could use your (let's face it, imaginary) system- the fact is that they used relativity.
So, relativity did something- it made the GPS system work.
So it has born fruit- and, in saying that it didn't- you were wrong.

Why not just accept that?
It's just one of so many thing you are hopelessly wrong about, so why would 1 more matter?
 

Offline IsItSomethingISaid

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #28 on: 18/10/2016 02:28:31 »
I am a layman in the topic, but have considered and read up on it over the several years.

My informed opinion is that time is the rate of change, movement, of energy and/or forms of energy relative to space. A unit of time being some form and amount of energy moving from here to somewhere else: Some amount of sand falling in a tapered glass container is "one hour."; The sun showing up at the same spot in the sky each day is "one day."

Time is not a fundamental aspect of the universe, but instead is an outcome of the interaction of energy with space.

The idea that time is a dimension has always struck me as suspect. If I go fast enough my length dimension will change according to an outside observer, as will my time--One year passes for me, while 100 passes for him. However, when I return home and stop, my length, according to the same outside observer, will be restored, while my time will not. That is, according to the observer our clocks will again tick at the same rate, but the alteration in my time, because of my trip, will not be restored--I will still be about 100 years younger than him.

Then it follows, for me at least, that the idea of "space-time" is highly suspect, as time is only apparent from the interaction of energy with space. If two people agree to meet at the local mall tomorrow, and then one goes on a very high speed spaceship ride. The result will be that the non-traveler will be at the mall in their tomorrow, while the traveler will show in his tomorrow; They will miss each other. Their space dimensions will be correct, but their time "dimension" will be incorrect.

Just my one-dollar's worth of two 1909 cents.
« Last Edit: 18/10/2016 02:30:37 by IsItSomethingISaid »
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #29 on: 30/10/2016 11:49:32 »
Heh :)

Time is

Or you're immortal, are you? IsItSomethingISaid? Although, even then 'time' will exist.
=
As for "All sub-atomic particles spin at the speed of light. " That reminds me of the 'spin' of a electron, faster than the speed of light.
=
Actually something from the nineteen thirties, I think?
 

Offline jeffreyw

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #30 on: 10/11/2016 19:02:16 »
OP is right about time not being a dimension. It is dimensionless. Anybody who has taken high school geometry knows this. Time is a change in something that has dimension, but time itself cannot change or morph/bend because it is dimensionless.

When you find out its about being "in the club" concerning the existence of time as a dimension and not about science, then you'll wake up.

Einstein really screwed the pooch. Bad. Now we have people believing in absolute absurdities without question, all because they want to save face.
 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #31 on: 13/11/2016 03:38:48 »
OP is right about time not being a dimension. It is dimensionless. Anybody who has taken high school geometry knows this. Time is a change in something that has dimension, but time itself cannot change or morph/bend because it is dimensionless.

When you find out its about being "in the club" concerning the existence of time as a dimension and not about science, then you'll wake up.

Einstein really screwed the pooch. Bad. Now we have people believing in absolute absurdities without question, all because they want to save face.

Plain wrong.

Time is not dimensionless, it often is expressed in units of seconds, hours, or years etc. (just as distance can be expressed in units of meters, miles, or lightyears etc.)

 
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Offline Janus

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Re: How can time be a dimension?
« Reply #32 on: 15/11/2016 17:19:24 »


The idea that time is a dimension has always struck me as suspect. If I go fast enough my length dimension will change according to an outside observer, as will my time--One year passes for me, while 100 passes for him. However, when I return home and stop, my length, according to the same outside observer, will be restored, while my time will not. That is, according to the observer our clocks will again tick at the same rate, but the alteration in my time, because of my trip, will not be restored--I will still be about 100 years younger than him.
However the distance traveled, as measured by you, will be 100 times shorter than the distance measured by you. Your "odometer" at the end of the trip would register a smaller distance, which is the length equivalent of the difference in elapsed time.  In other words, the fact that he sees you length contracted and your tick rate as running slow are like effects and only hold while you are in motion with respect to him.  Your accumulated age and odometer reading at the end of the trip are the hold-overs.  So to say that there is no hold over effect from length contraction is wrong.
 
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Online PmbPhy

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Re: Re: Is spacetime real?
« Reply #33 on: Today at 05:04:15 »
Quote from: Atkhenaken
Time is not a dimension. It is only an intellectual device and a measurement of spin rotations. Note - Dimension is term to describe distances while time is not distance related.
If you can construct a tesseract without using computer programming I will sign up to become a space/time believer tomorrow. Good luck! Happy building! lol!
It's statements like this which show your ignorance physics and its language. Time is spoken of as a dimension but it's not a dimension in space but a dimension in spacetime. The term "spacetime" is the name given to the manifold of all events where an event is a point in space, i.e. (x, y, z), at an instant of time, t. The event is labeled (ct, x, y, z). The value of number required to uniquely determine a point in a manifold is called the "dimension" of that manifold. Its for that reason and in that sense that time is said to be a dimension.
 

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Re: Re: Is spacetime real?
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