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Author Topic: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation  (Read 258 times)

Offline William McC

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Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« on: 17/09/2016 21:47:51 »
One effect magnets can have is that they can allow electrical fields to permeate insulators. The skin is an insulator. So by hanging a powerful magnet around someones arm, this could allow electrical effects to permeate the skin. What effect electric could have on the blood is a guess.

I know that radiation and powerful electrical current can cause plasma to separate out of the blood. A sort of platting operation. Sometimes the body when under constant attack really kicks in and steps up repairs.

Sincerely,

Wiliam McCormick



 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #1 on: 18/09/2016 15:32:20 »
"One effect magnets can have is that they can allow electrical fields to permeate insulators."
Electric fields permeate insulators just fine without a magnet.
Air, for example, is an insulator, but you can make bits of paper jump around with a comb when there is air between them.

"So by hanging a powerful magnet around someones arm, this could allow electrical effects to permeate the skin. "
Anyone who has touched an electric fence or used a tens machine or electronic muscle stimulator knows that you do not need a magnet for the current to go through the skin.

"I know that radiation and powerful electrical current can cause plasma to separate out of the blood."
Who was the victim and can we see the coroners report?
(Obviously, if your blood separated out like that it would kill you so it figures that there will have been an official investigation.)
"Sometimes the body when under constant attack really kicks in and steps up repairs. "
But usually, you die.
 

Offline William McC

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #2 on: 18/09/2016 20:41:02 »
"One effect magnets can have is that they can allow electrical fields to permeate insulators."
Electric fields permeate insulators just fine without a magnet.
Air, for example, is an insulator, but you can make bits of paper jump around with a comb when there is air between them.

"So by hanging a powerful magnet around someones arm, this could allow electrical effects to permeate the skin. "
Anyone who has touched an electric fence or used a tens machine or electronic muscle stimulator knows that you do not need a magnet for the current to go through the skin.

"I know that radiation and powerful electrical current can cause plasma to separate out of the blood."
Who was the victim and can we see the coroners report?
(Obviously, if your blood separated out like that it would kill you so it figures that there will have been an official investigation.)
"Sometimes the body when under constant attack really kicks in and steps up repairs. "
But usually, you die.

A permanent magnet can allow 120 volt current to breach insulation rated for 600 volts. Without the magnet present there is no breach, with the magnet present there is a breach.

The permanent magnets field acts much like the field of an antenna with a powered amplifier.

A powerful magnet placed near or on an electrical enclosure can cause the internal components to be ruined, shorted, or just mess up the communications. That is why we need to be careful when working near fire alarm systems with flashlights that have a powerful permanent magnet. As I mentioned it can cause damage to the internal electronics through the steel cover.

Over a distance from high tension power lines or fluorescent bulbs in a room, your skin does a good job of protecting your internal parts and substances. If you place a magnet near or on your skin, those magnetic fields, those effects that are using the air like a dielectric, can now penetrate the skin in the area of the magnet.

People who die of radiation poisoning die because their blood separates out into plasma and whats left of the blood, similar to effects a burn causes. The lungs are filled with fluid caused by the burns, they die of pneumonia in most cases. Even though they would die of other causes eventually. This is so basic that I doubt I have to prove it in anyway. If however I come across some cool articles I will post them.

Sincerely,

William McCormick

 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #3 on: 19/09/2016 19:34:44 »
"A permanent magnet can allow 120 volt current to breach insulation rated for 600 volts. "
Got any evidence with that?

"A powerful magnet placed near or on an electrical enclosure can cause the internal components to be ruined, shorted, or just mess up the communications. "

Some of the strongest magnets I own are tucked away in the disk drives of my computers. They obviously do not "cause the internal components to be ruined, shorted, or just mess up the communications. "

"People who die of radiation poisoning die because their blood separates out into plasma and whats left of the blood"
No they don't
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome

This
"Over a distance from high tension power lines or fluorescent bulbs in a room, your skin does a good job of protecting your internal parts and substances."
just doesn't make sense.
 

Offline Atomic-S

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #4 on: 29/09/2016 05:48:36 »
This subject could benefit from some specific citations of detailed evidence.  One thing that occurs to me is that these various effects may or may not occur depending on exact conditions, such as the chemical structure of an insulator that is affected vs. one that is not.  The human skin and polyethylene may respond differently, in an electrical sense, to the application of a (AC or DC?) magnetic field. It may also matter whether the field is parallel or perpendicular to the wire.
 

Offline William McC

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #5 on: 30/09/2016 06:22:23 »
"A permanent magnet can allow 120 volt current to breach insulation rated for 600 volts. "
Got any evidence with that?

"A powerful magnet placed near or on an electrical enclosure can cause the internal components to be ruined, shorted, or just mess up the communications. "

Some of the strongest magnets I own are tucked away in the disk drives of my computers. They obviously do not "cause the internal components to be ruined, shorted, or just mess up the communications. "

"People who die of radiation poisoning die because their blood separates out into plasma and whats left of the blood"
No they don't
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_radiation_syndrome

This
"Over a distance from high tension power lines or fluorescent bulbs in a room, your skin does a good job of protecting your internal parts and substances."
just doesn't make sense.

If I open a cabinet of an alarm system and key up a building radio, I will cause relays to engage and disengage in the system. Of this there is not doubt. We have to be very careful. We are usually working in government buildings that are occupied. As far as strong flashlight magnets the same is true, we have to be very careful where we place the magnet of a flashlight. Or we will cause the system to fail.

I have gotten small nuisance shocks from a power cord that I always have my hand next to while machining. I keep my hand by the switch to kill power quickly when i am machining. One day I started getting shocks from the chord, when I went to see what it was, it turned out a magnet I used for testing stainless, was stuck next to the chord just out of sight. I removed it and it stopped, I put it back and it started again. Is this scientific proof I doubt it. However as I learned about magnetic fields it totally understandable. An amp meter turns the field around a wire into voltage. A magnet can do the same thing.

Now if you are not familiar with magnetic fields you may not know that while you are in one, and something like a rubber band breaks, or a small electrochemical reaction takes place that your body can be rather drastically effected. When a start capacitor blows, on a large AC motor, your body can be rather severely effected, by the far reaching magnetic field.

Thorium can cause voltage in the body for sure, it was used many years ago as a cure for some diseases. Did it actually work I cannot say and I would not recommend it. However some claimed it was a miracle cure, others died from it.

Sincerely,

William McCormick

 

Offline Atomic-S

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #6 on: 30/10/2016 03:25:07 »
"If I open a cabinet of an alarm system and key up a building radio, I will cause relays to engage and disengage in the system. " That is not unreasonable, depending on the nature of the system. It is called radio interference. The cabinet when closed provides shielding; when open, not so much. 

" As far as strong flashlight magnets the same is true, we have to be very careful where we place the magnet of a flashlight. Or we will cause the system to fail. "  Entirely possible, depending on the nature of the system. Many alarm sensors work by detecting the presence or absence of a magnetic field on a door, window, or other object.  Maybe some alarm systems have internal relays that also would be magnetically sensitive.

"I have gotten small nuisance shocks from a power cord that I always have my hand next to while machining. I keep my hand by the switch to kill power quickly when i am machining. One day I started getting shocks from the chord, when I went to see what it was, it turned out a magnet I used for testing stainless, was stuck next to the chord just out of sight. I removed it and it stopped, I put it back and it started again. " It is hard to know what to make out of this observation, not knowing the exact situation. Could the magnet have touched a bad spot in the insulation and directly contacted the conductor inside?

"Now if you are not familiar with magnetic fields you may not know that while you are in one, and something like a rubber band breaks, or a small electrochemical reaction takes place that your body can be rather drastically effected."  A  more precise explanation would be helpful.

"When a start capacitor blows, on a large AC motor, your body can be rather severely effected, by the far reaching magnetic field" This is not a permanent magnet, but a strong electromagnetic transient. Such transients may well induce electrical jolts in surrounding conductors, such as your body.

 

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Re: Effect of magnetic field on cable insulation
« Reply #6 on: 30/10/2016 03:25:07 »

 

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