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Author Topic: Could subatomic particles exist in a different time dimension?  (Read 263 times)

Offline amandint

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If a subatomic particle could spin only 360 to return to its standing state, space and time needs to change around it.

Could subatomic particles behave according to the laws of physics if we stop measuring their behaviour based on time and space of our experiments and instead, base them on time and space of their existence. To us they appear to come in and out of existence and spin at a different rate to particles existing at a larger level. What if, due to their speed and transcience, they exist in a different time and space to us. Is it measurable? Has this been studied already? If we slow time and expand or contract space at a subatomic level, would they behave according to the laws of physics?

If time and space at the quatum level is different, could these sub atomic particles exist permanently and could we be missing the chance to see quatum "history"?


« Last Edit: 16/10/2016 01:17:27 by amandint »


 

Offline Colin2B

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If a subatomic particle could spin only 360 to return to its standing state, space and time needs to change around it.
Could you explain what you mean by this please.
 

Offline amandint

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I am wondering if the spin of an observed particle with S1/2 might affect its surroundings. Rather then measuring the angular momentum on a space "constant", or a single point in space, perhaps we should change the "constant" or point in order to understand the behaviour. Then we would perhaps see that at a quantum level, the particles exist at such a speed that not only mass and energy are affected, but so is time and space. Space itself is "spun".

Turn it around from measuring the angular momentum based on a linear measurement of time and space, to measuring the infrastructure of the environment of particles at light speed. Space would bend and it may bend enough for the 720 to become 360. Quarks that can only exist in a group must occupy a "space" which is not a point or a constant , but a time in changing space.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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This would only be possible if time contraction operated at the subatomic scale. This would give the impression that a particles angular momentum exceeded the speed of light if treated as classical angular momentum. It may also reconcile the 720 degree rotation idea.
 

Offline amandint

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Yes. Despite their size, by travelling at light speed, and "spinning once through 720" with linear acceleration momentum at greater than light speed (another "not possible" situation), they become a force that bends time and space like any other light - speed travelling object. We need to concentrate on the force on space created by the speed of travel.

Let's bend the environment (space and time) we measure them in and see if they behave themselves. That might allow us to fill the gaps we think are in the universe. Perhaps there are no gaps when we change these underlying assumption at the quantum level.
 

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