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Offline Melinda1958

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vitamin suppliments
« Reply #25 on: 01/11/2007 20:27:39 »
Attention News/Assignment/Health Editors:

Vitamin D Deficiency Drains $9 billion From Canadian Health Care System
    Vitamin D Society Declares November 'Vitamin D Awareness Month' in Canada

    KELOWNA, BC, Oct. 31 /CNW/ - Research this year has left no doubt that
vitamin D deficiency - which affects an estimated 97 per cent of Canadians in
the winter - is nothing less than a Canadian crisis and a worldwide problem.
    This is why Canada's Vitamin D Society is recognizing the month of
November as the world's first Vitamin D Awareness Month.

    <<
    Consider:

    -  Vitamin D deficiency in Canada is a multibillion-dollar contributor to
       skyrocketing health care costs, according to a soon-to-be published
       report commissioned by the Vitamin D Society. Dr. William Grant, whose
       Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center is a leading vitamin D
       advocacy group worldwide, is the study's author. Dr. Grant
       conservatively calculates the cost of vitamin D deficiency on the
       Canadian health care system to be no less than $9 billion annually,
       based on established disease risk reduction in individuals with
       natural vitamin D levels. Vitamin D deficiency is now associated with
       higher risks of 22 forms of cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis,
       osteoporosis, flu and many other disorders.

    -  A landmark Creighton University study this year - the first-ever
       clinical trial to confirm the results of hundreds of epidemiologic
       studies on this topic - showed that people rich in vitamin D have up
       to a 77 per cent lower overall cancer risk. Published in the American
       Journal of Clinical Nutrition in June, the four-year clinical trial
       followed 1,200 women who took high levels of vitamin D and matched
       them against a control group who did not take the vitamin. Those rich
       in vitamin D had up to 77 per cent fewer cancers as compared to the
       control group. That's twice the impact on cancer risk attributed to
       smoking.

    -  The Canadian Paediatric Society in September recommended that pregnant
       women consult their physicians about getting 2,000 international units
       (IU) of vitamin D daily - 10 times the current government
       recommendation - based on the avalanche of new pro-vitamin D research.
       Breast milk is believed to be a poor source of vitamin D only because
       mothers typically are deficient in vitamin D, according to Dr. John
       Godel, principal author of the Canadian Paediatric Society's
       statement.

    -  The Canadian Cancer Society in June called for all Canadian adults to
       get 1,000 IU of vitamin D daily. In a bold move in October, the group
       called for major medical institutions in North America to organize
       more clinical trials to further substantiate the vitamin D case.
    >>

    Long known only as the body's catalyst for proper calcium absorption,
vitamin D plays a key part in cell growth regulation in the body - a recent
discovery which explains how researchers in the past five years have
quantified the vitamin's role in the prevention of 22 forms of cancer as well
as heart disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and several other
disorders.
    Because of the profound effects of vitamin D deficiency, the Vitamin D
Society is recognizing November in Canada as the world's first Vitamin D
Awareness Month. The message is simple:

    <<
    -  Canadians especially are at risk for Vitamin D deficiency because of
       the country's relatively weak sunshine most of the year and the fact
       that vitamin D is rare in diet, occurring naturally only in fatty
       fish. Milk typically is supplemented with vitamin D.

    -  The Vitamin D Society recommends asking your doctor for an annual
       blood test to check your vitamin D levels. More important than your
       daily intake of vitamin D is your actual vitamin D blood level, which
       can be measured with a calcidiol test (also known as a
       25-hydroxyvitamin D test). Optimal vitamin D blood levels are
       50 ng/mL (125 nmol/L), according to The Vitamin D Council.

    For more information on vitamin D visit:
    -  newbielink:http://www.vitaminDsociety.org [nonactive]
    -  newbielink:http://www.vitaminDcouncil.com [nonactive]
    -  newbielink:http://www.Direct-ms.org [nonactive].
    -  newbielink:http://www.sunarc.org [nonactive]
    >>

    The Vitamin D Society is a Canadian non-profit group organized to:
increase awareness of the many health conditions strongly linked to vitamin D
deficiency; encourage Canadians to be proactive in protecting their health and
have their vitamin D blood levels tested annually and fund valuable vitamin D
research.

    MEDIA: Canadian vitamin D expert Dr. Reinhold Vieth is available for
interviews. To arrange an interview, contact Olga Petrycki at 416-360-6522
ext. 226.



For further information: Olga Petrycki at (416) 360-6522 ext. 226

 
 

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Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #26 on: 01/11/2007 20:39:51 »
If you are unsure if a vitamin especially multivitamin is doing you any good try this test..
Take an apple and cut it in fourths.  Place it in a glass of water to cover it.  Drop in the suspect vitamin.  Record how long it takes to dissolve, should be less than 1/2 hour.  Anything left after that will just be wasted.  Then after 4 days see what the condition of the water and the apple is.  If the apple looks healthy enough to eat the antioxidants n your vitamins are working.  If not, your cells aren't getting the level of support they need.  There are supplements out there that do protect the apple, I have seen them with my own eyes.
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #27 on: 01/11/2007 23:17:22 »
CoEnzyme Q10 protects nerve cells

CoEnzyme Q10 has shown the ability to protect nerve cells and potentially lower the risk of various degenerative diseases.

Cells in the brain and nervous system depend on optimal mitochondrial function for energy. A research study published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease showed that oxidative stress causes mitochondria to produce excessive free radicals, leading to nerve cell damage and destruction. Due to its function in the mitochondrial energy process and its role as an antioxidant, researchers evaluated CoEnzyme Q10 for its ability to protect nerve cells.

The results of this study revealed that CoEnzyme Q10 inhibits the production of free radicals by the mitochondria and stabilizes the mitochondrial membrane when nerve cells are subjected to oxidative stress. CoEnzyme Q10 may therefore have a potential benefit in reducing the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases.

Neurobiol Dis. 2005 Apr;18(3):618-27
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #28 on: 02/11/2007 11:17:01 »
Attention News/Assignment/Health Editors:

Vitamin D Deficiency Drains $9 billion From Canadian Health Care System
    Vitamin D Society Declares November 'Vitamin D Awareness Month' in Canada

    KELOWNA, BC, Oct. 31 /CNW/ - Research this year has left no doubt that
vitamin D deficiency - which affects an estimated 97 per cent of Canadians in
the winter - is nothing less than a Canadian crisis and a worldwide problem.
    This is why Canada's Vitamin D Society is recognizing the month of
November as the world's first Vitamin D Awareness Month.

...

        For more information on vitamin D visit:
    -  www.vitaminDsociety.org
    -  www.vitamindcouncil.com
    -  www.Direct-ms.org.
    -  www.sunarc.org
   

Up with Melinda1958 and her wonderful
vitamin D update...Oct.31!!!
It's gonna be tough anyway: vitamin D3
is cheap, already classified as a 'generic'
drug, even toxic when badly used, cod
liver oil seems a relic from the past
.


But new, wonderful and properly priced
vitamin D3 analogues are on the way...
it seems that we have to wait just a
minute for a real,"effective" and
powerful commercial DRUG.

Fortunately, old cod liver oil is still
commonly used as a nutrient for pets,
dogs, horses, iguanas ...lucky beasts!


ikod   [^]


...for your horses (if you have any):
Quote
BONE, HOOF, JOINT & MUSCLES


COD LIVER OIL

This non-heating oil for energy and mobility is high in fish Omega 3 & 6 essential oils (strictly speaking it is only suitable for carnivores as we do not often see horses fishing!) but it has been used for many years as an additive to equine feeds.  Any oil helps lubricate the joints of veterans of any species  and Cod Liver Oil also promotes a sleek coat and healthy skin as well as nutritional support for bones and hooves

Quality: ******* Health Cod Liver Oil is 100% pure and contains no heavy metals, it is important to find out if a cheaper version does.

Feeding: 10 to 20ml (20ml is about 1 tablespoon) per 100kg bodyweight (16.2hh is about 500kg) best divided between 2 feeds daily. Feed the lower rate for general maintenance and the higher for pregnant or lactating mares, breeding stallions, young stock and very hard working animals (eg. racehorses & highly competitive animals)  1Lt will last a general maintenance 500kg horse about 20 days and a high category 500kg horse about 10 days.


more from:   http://www.pegasushealth.com/productinfo.php?product_id=48



Quote

********* COD LIVER OIL is a high energy oil which is palatable to all animals. The oil is derived from a cod's liver (fish), making it a pure natural product. It contains two essential fatty acids and important stabilised vitamins A and D. It is also widely known for its nutritional and therapeutic value and is used extensively on thoroughbred studs, racing, trotting and greyhound establishments and for birds.

VITAMIN A is an essential nutrient for all horses, dogs and cattle. It is necessary for general growth, bone formation and for the formation of visual purple in the eye. A deficiency of it leads to drying of mucous membranes, which makes them more susceptible to bacterial invasion. This also results in increased susceptibility to diseases in the respiratory tract. For females, during gestation and lactation, there is an increased need for vitamin A. For animals that are fed a high concentration of dry, prepared diets, vitamin A is essential as it may be lost during the food processing.

Suggested Dose Rates:
Large Animals ie. horses, cattle Age Small Animals ie. dogs, cats
15 ml Baby 1 ml
30 ml Yearling 3 ml
60 ml Adult 5 ml

VITAMIN D is important for growth of bones and teeth and it ensures the bodies right utilisation of calcium and phosphorus. A daily intake of ******** COD LIVER OIL will provide your animal with a fine healthy coat and skin. Animals housed and rugged are not able to intake natural vitamin D derived from the sunlight. Cod Liver Oil with vitamin D and two essential fatty acids helps overcome this deficiency.




« Last Edit: 01/09/2008 20:50:04 by iko »
 

another_someone

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vitamin suppliments
« Reply #29 on: 02/11/2007 18:03:51 »
CoEnzyme Q10 protects nerve cells

CoEnzyme Q10 has shown the ability to protect nerve cells and potentially lower the risk of various degenerative diseases.

Cells in the brain and nervous system depend on optimal mitochondrial function for energy. A research study published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease showed that oxidative stress causes mitochondria to produce excessive free radicals, leading to nerve cell damage and destruction. Due to its function in the mitochondrial energy process and its role as an antioxidant, researchers evaluated CoEnzyme Q10 for its ability to protect nerve cells.

The results of this study revealed that CoEnzyme Q10 inhibits the production of free radicals by the mitochondria and stabilizes the mitochondrial membrane when nerve cells are subjected to oxidative stress. CoEnzyme Q10 may therefore have a potential benefit in reducing the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases.

Neurobiol Dis. 2005 Apr;18(3):618-27

http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Coenzyme-Q10.html
Quote
Statins Inhibit Coenzyme Q10 Synthesis

Since coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and cholesterol are both synthesized from the same substance, mevalonate, statin drugs (Lipitor, Zocor, etc) also inhibit the body's synthesis of coenzyme Q10. This is not a "side effect," of statins, but a direct, inherent function of the drugs.

In fact, the use of statins can decrease the body's synthesis of coenzyme Q10 by as much as 40%!

http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/coq10.htm
Quote
The widespread use of statin drugs is of special concern because they can lower the endogenous levels of Coenzyme Q10, the naturally-occurring form of ubiquinone in humans. Ubiquinone is widely recognized as an essential component of energy metabolism in the electron-transfer system in mitochondrial membranes. At physiological concentrations it is also recognized as an effective lipid-soluble antioxidant. It is one of the end products of the mevalonate pathway where dolichol (a component of animal membranes) and cholesterol are synthesized. Both ubiqionone and dolichol are released by the liver cells into the blood circulation, but in much lower concentrations than that of cholesterol.

Ghirlanda et al(2) reported in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study a decrease of 50-54% of CoQ10 levels in the statin treatment groups, and similar results were reproduced by Watts et al(3).

Bliznakov and Wilkins reviewed studies of the effect of statins on the biosynthesis of Coenzyme Q10 and the clinical implication of CoQ10 deficiency.(4) The authors report that lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin lower the endogenous levels of Coenzyme Q10, as CoQ10 shares the common biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol.

Considering that Coenzyme Q10 is essential for mitochondrial function and antioxidant activity, and since oxidative mechanisms are important in atherogenesis, it can be assumed that a reduction in CoQ10 level may compromise coronary atherosclerosis despite optimal reduction in cholesterol levels by the use of statin drugs.

Furthermore, the reduction of ubiquinone levels might be associated with myopathy, a rare adverse effect associated with statin drugs. This "metabolic" myopathy is related to ubiquinone deficiency in muscle cell mitochondria, disturbing normal cellular respiration and causing adverse effects such as rhabdomyolysis, exercise intolerance, and recurrent myoglobinuria.(5)

It has also been suggested that CoQ10 deficiency can cause mitochondrial encephalomyopathies related to a primary or secondary ubiquinone deficient status, or even to an altered function of ubiquinone in the respiratory chain.(6) It is important to emphasize that Coenzyme Q10 supplementation does not interfere with the cholesterol-lowering effect of statin drugs(7) and therefore may be considered for all patients using such medications for an extended period of time.

Recognizing the importance of dietary supplementation with vitamins (E, C, B6, folate), and essential nutrients (CoQ10, L-arginine, propionyl L-carnitine) as an adjunct in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, we should pay attention to the potential adverse effect of drug-induced nutrient depletion affecting the aforementioned nutrients.

Pharmaceutical companies that market statin drugs should consider including the described CoQ10 potential depletion in their drug information materials provided to physicians and pharmacists, and they should encourage patients to consult their physician and pharmacist for appropriate supplementation.

Integration of nutritional medicine in the clinical practice of medicine can benefit for our patients using prescription medications for disease management and treatment.
 

Offline whale

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« Reply #30 on: 08/11/2007 07:44:45 »
Quote from: paul.fr ink=topic=7032.msg72885#msg72885 date=1174976505
do we actually need vitamin suppliments? you see in boots for instance, a whole range of suppliments with a lot aimed at children.do children need suppliments?
I can see a case for them in more deprived countries where a balanced diet may not be possible.

don't take any myself, I prefer the natural way--juices or superfoods when I can afford them

You could amke a case for Vitamin C as we have a genetic defect blocking our making of it as Irwin Stone proved, and most folk are very defecient given their diet. 

Most pills are full of chemicals

Oils are important and you can get that without the pill factor--udos oil was one

 

Offline Bored chemist

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« Reply #31 on: 08/11/2007 20:07:29 »
"Most pills are full of chemicals"
That's exactly what I buy them for, but just out of idle curiosity, what exactly could they be made from other than chemicals?
 

Offline whale

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« Reply #32 on: 08/11/2007 20:42:11 »
you know what I meant.  Nutrients.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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« Reply #33 on: 08/11/2007 21:39:26 »
Nutrients are exactly the sort of chemicals I usually buy pills for.

If I bought vitamin pills and they didn't have nutrients in them I'd report the sellers for fraud.

OK sometimes I'm after drugs, but most of the pills I swallow are vitamins. (I just don't like all the natural soources much and I want to be sure I'm getting enough)
 

Offline VitaminC

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« Reply #34 on: 09/11/2007 18:28:47 »

I think the idea was that supplements are sometimes full of other things besides what they say on the label. For example, fish oils can have a lot of mercury in them, or PCBs. You have to trust your source... which usually means 'spend more money to get quality'
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #35 on: 13/11/2007 17:01:33 »
Quote from: paul.fr ink=topic=7032.msg72885#msg72885 date=1174976505
do we actually need vitamin suppliments? you see in boots for instance, a whole range of supplements with a lot aimed at children.do children need supplements?
I can see a case for them in more deprived countries where a balanced diet may not be possible.
If you do your homework, you will find supplements out there that aren't full of chemicals that are man made. You have to eat pounds and pounds of food these days to get the equivalent of a good supplement, due to the over-processing and soil depletion.  It can be done but personally I can't eat that much.




 

Offline iko

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« Reply #36 on: 13/11/2007 17:10:25 »
Hi Melinda1958,

I certainly agree with you.
I'm only a bit less pessimistic about my 'processed' food:
it is cheap, available where I live...and sometimes with less invisible moulds and aflatoxins of sort.
Plus a squeezed lemon and cod liver oil to fix it!  ;D

ikod
« Last Edit: 13/11/2007 17:14:37 by iko »
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #37 on: 15/11/2007 03:00:42 »
Now, for the good news about TURMERIC EXTRACT:

 

Researchers have long been aware of the health benefits of the curry spice turmeric, which is the source of curcumin (or turmeric extract).  In fact, in India where turmeric is used daily Alzheimer's disease is nearly absent in a country (per the population size).   Curcurmin is the same thing as turmeric extract.  It is a powerful antioxidant and it has powerful anti-inflammatory properties.  Inflammation is one of the most destructive processes that damages our cells and organs, leading to disease and aging.   

 

Researchers have long studied the turmeric extract's application in fighting cancer, arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and reversing the process underlying Alzheimer's disease.

 

One of the most important activites in the human body is turmeric extract's ability to inhibit chronic inflammation (by inhibiting activation of transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B, NF-kB).  What's the big deal?  Well, NF-kB activation has been implicated in ALL stages  of the development and propagation of cancer; and switching off the NF-kB genes, which turmeric extract seems to do has been a huge subject of intense research.

 

The National Institutes of Health in Washington, D.C. has funded numerous studies on turmeric extract (curcumin) because of the diverse benefits of this antioxidant spice.    It effects virtually every organ of the body.  The applications include the treatment of cystic fibrosis (the most common genetic disorder in Caucasians), autoimmune diseases, such as sceleroderma, the prevention and treatment of cancer, the prevention and treatment of heart disease, reverse the damage associated with high blood sugar (diabetes), the prevention and treatment of both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and multiple sclerosis.  It may help prevent cataracts; it shows promise as a treatment for skin disorders such as psoriasis; and it helps in the treatment of wounds. 

 

Among other benefits, turmeric extract has antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activities.  This is not said lightly, and should not be overlooked as a minor benefit, particularly in wound healing.

 

Of all the benefits of curcumin or turmeric extract, it is the prevention and treatment of cancer that has most scientist in awe.  One investigator wrote, "Curcumin ...has emerged as one of the most powerful chemopreventative and anticancer agents.  It's biological effects range from antioxidant and anti-inflammatory to inhibition of angiogenesis, and is shown to possess specific antitumoral activity."   Cancer Res 2007 Mar 1:67(5):1988

 

Although anticancer drugs weaken the immune system, turmeric extract strengthens the immune system as it fights cancer at every step of cancer development and propagation.

 

For cancer to develop, it has to initiate ...turmeric extract stops this.  It has to propagate (progression and promotion), ...turmeric extract stops this.  New blood vessels have to be formed to feed the new cancer cells so they can survive (angiogenesis), turmeric extract stop this, ... and turmeric extract induces apoptosis, the self-destruction of cancer cells.  It does all this while protecting the rest of the body from other diseases and inflammation.  Turmeric extract seems to be the perfect designer substance.  It appears that man could not design or develop a more perfect substance ....but, that doesn't mean it wouldn't stop them from trying.

 

Interesting, but not suprising to me, pharmaceutical companies are racing to try and come up with patentable compounds that mimic the actions of turmeric extract so they can make huge profits; when interesting enough the compound and benefits obviously already exist!  Ah, the greed of mankind never ceases to amaze me.  (But, we saw this with the benefits of the safety and effectiveness of grape seed extract and the eventual development of Vioxx and Celebrex, a Cox 2 inhibitor.  How did that work out for Big Pharma?  More importantly, how did it work out for the benefit of the patients?)

 

What specific cancers has turmeric extract (curcumin) been shown to benefit?

 

In 2007, scientists at the Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham published at report in the journal Cancer Research showing how turmeric extract (curmumin) reduced prostate cancer cells' production of a protein MDM2, which is associated with the formation of malignant tumors.  Simultaneously, curmumin prompted cells to produce another protein associated with apoptosis (programmed cell death).   Cancer Res 2007 Mar 1:67(5):1988

 

It's interesting that India has has one of the lowest incidence of prostate cancer rates in the world.  The annual prostate cancer incidence rate in India is ranges from 5.0 to 9.1 per 100,000/year.  In contrast, among white males in the U.S., the incidence is 110.4 per 100,000/year!   More than ten times higher.  For black males in the U.S., it is even HIGHER!   Could it be due to the consumption of turmeric?  The average intake of turmeric spice in India is 2 - 2.5 grams per day.  Thus, it is to our advantage to obtain turmeric extract that would surpass that in its equivalency by at least 3 to 6 fold.

 

Curcumin (turmeric extract) has been shown to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy agent, gemcitabine, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.  This chemotherapy agent loses it effectiveness as the cancer progresses, curmcumin (turmeric extract) helps prevent the tumors resistance to the drug. 

 

Curcumin (turmeric extract) interferes with the proliferation of various types of colon cancer, and it enhances the efficacy of existing an existing chemotherapeutic agent, oxaliplatin in the fight against colon cancer.

 

Curcumin's effect against breast cancer is nothing short of amazing; both against a common variety of breast cancer cells, as well as a mutant line of breast cancer cells that have developed resistance to chemotherapy drugs.  Turmeric extract exerts its effects on cell proliferation, cycling  and death.  Turmeric extract (or curcumin) seems able to adapt its anticancer activity according to need, including in multi-drug resitant tumors of the breast, prostate, and leukemia cell lines.

 

Lastly, turmeric extract is particlurly beneficial in preventing cognitive decline, in the prevention or treatment of major disabling age-related neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and stroke.   Adv Ex Med Biol  2007;197

 

A few mechanism of action may account for such benefits.  Turmeric extract appears to reduce lead toxicity by raising levels of the antioxidant glutathione, as well as bind to (chelate) heavy metals and remove them.  Furthermore, turmeric extract is an antioxidant, protecting oxidative damage to neurons of the brain by promoting production of a protective enzyme hem oxygenase-1 (HO-1).  This is a fundamental defense mechanism for neurons exposed to oxidation.   (And, to think Pfizer wants us to use high-dose Lipitor to protect everyone from Alzheimer's disease.)

 

Memory loss begins by age 50, and by age 80, it predicted that half of us will advance to some form of dementia (Alzhemier's or not).   Asian epidemiological studies found that those who consumed curry (with the turmeric spice) showed strong evidence of "better cognitive performance" and "less age-related dementia."   Am J Empidemiol 2006 Nov 1;164(9):898

 

Okay, as always, "what about safety?"

 

Given that turmeric is a food that has been safely consumed for millennia (even by pregnant women), curcumin, or turmeric extract, would appear to be a perfect dietary supplement.   Altern Med Rev. 2001 Sep'6 Suppl S62-6   In fact, one researcher wrote, "Curcumin has an outstanding safety profile and a number of multifunctional actions ..."  Phase I clincal trials, using massive doses of curcumin, or turmeric extract (up to 8 grams/day for four months "did not result in discernable toxicities."  Adv Exp Med Biol 2007;565:471

 

The myriad of benefits to be obtained from turmeric extract are emerging with a clear safety margin.  Last week I wrote about the amazing benefits of obtaining at least 1,000 IU/day of vitamin D.

 

This week, I am going to suggest that you look to obtain at least 60 mg per day of turmeric extract, but may I suggest, that the benefits I am suggesting in this e-newsletter are going to be realized in the neighborhood of 600 to 1000 mg per day.

 

Personally, between the number of antioxidants per day, the number of "liver health maintenance product" I take per day (I take a few extra), and the product I take to help "maintain the health of my joints," I am obtaining well over 700 mg of turmeric extract per day. 

 

Add that to the 1,200 IU/day of vitamin D I am obtaining, plus the full-range of antioxidants I get, along with my omega-3 fatty acids, and I think I doing pretty well.

 

No nutritional supplement program is a guaratee against any disease, or even death.  It's all about protecting our cells, helping them operate at their optimum, avoiding toxic substances as best we can, and then doing our best to live the best lifestyle we can.

 

I hope to see you on tomorrow night's webcast.

 

Until the next e-newsletter .....

 

To see past newsletters (like the one on vitamin D), please visit:

newbielink:http://mcnamaraupdates.blogspot.com [nonactive]

 

 

Thanks, and good health.

 

Ladd McNamara, M.D

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 

   
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #38 on: 15/11/2007 20:58:32 »
In a study of adults followed for 10 years, those with higher plasma carotene concentrations had a lower overall risk of death, and a lower risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease specifically.

Beta-carotene linked to reduced mortality risk in the elderly

In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers have demonstrated an association between plasma carotene levels and lower death rates among the elderly. This prospective study involved 1168 elderly men and women who were followed for 10 years. After the follow-up period, researchers looked at causes of mortality in the study population. The subjects with higher plasma carotene concentrations had a lower overall mortality risk, and a lower risk of mortality from cancer and cardiovascular disease specifically. To put the results in context, researchers performed a meta-analysis of 5 studies on plasma antioxidants and all-cause mortality in elderly populations.

These findings are somewhat surprising since some of the previous supplemental trials have been negative or inconclusive. The researchers suggested that the confusing evidence so far may indicate that beta-carotene needs to be taken in concert with other antioxidants to have a beneficial effect on health.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 82, No. 4, 879-886, October 2005
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #39 on: 15/11/2007 22:08:38 »
Hi CurcuMelinda1958!  ;)

I personally "curcuminized" this forum quite a lot in the recent past...
if you run a quick search here, I'm sure that you'll enjoy those bits!

ikod   [^]


...talking about garlic and 'kitchen medicine'...





Curcumin as "Curecumin": From kitchen to clinic.

Goel A, Kunnumakkara AB, Aggarwal BB.
Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Laboratory, Department of Internal Medicine, Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center and Baylor Research Institute, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.

Although turmeric (Curcuma longa; an Indian spice) has been described in Ayurveda, as a treatment for inflammatory diseases and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, a yellow pigment present in turmeric (curry powder) has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins. Curcumin also downregulates cyclin D1, cyclin E and MDM2; and upregulates p21, p27, and p53. Various preclinical cell culture and animal studies suggest that curcumin has potential as an antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antiangiogenic agent; as a mediator of chemoresistance and radioresistance; as a chemopreventive agent; and as a therapeutic agent in wound healing, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, and arthritis. Pilot phase I clinical trials have shown curcumin to be safe even when consumed at a daily dose of 12g for 3 months. Other clinical trials suggest a potential therapeutic role for curcumin in diseases such as familial adenomatous polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, hypercholesteremia, atherosclerosis, pancreatitis, psoriasis, chronic anterior uveitis and arthritis. Thus, curcumin, a spice once relegated to the kitchen shelf, has moved into the clinic and may prove to be "Curecumin".

Biochem Pharmacol. 2007 Aug 19;






Curcumin seems to be a real 'panacea' these days...
Think of the massive impact on our lives and society
severe brain injuries have, either from strokes or
heavy head traumas.


Dietary curcumin counteracts the outcome of traumatic brain injury
 on oxidative stress, synaptic plasticity, and cognition.

Wu A, Ying Z, Gomez-Pinilla F.
Dept. Physiological Science, Univ.of California at Los Angeles, 621 Charles E. Young Drive, 90095, USA.

The pervasive action of oxidative stress on neuronal function and plasticity after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is becoming increasingly recognized. Here, we evaluated the capacity of the powerful antioxidant curry spice curcumin ingested in the diet to counteract the oxidative damage encountered in the injured brain. In addition, we have examined the possibility that dietary curcumin may favor the injured brain by interacting with molecular mechanisms that maintain synaptic plasticity and cognition. The analysis was focused on the BDNF system based on its action on synaptic plasticity and cognition by modulating synapsin I and CREB. Rats were exposed to a regular diet or a diet high in saturated fat, with or without 500 ppm curcumin for 4 weeks (n = 8/group), before a mild fluid percussion injury (FPI) was performed. The high-fat diet has been shown to exacerbate the effects of TBI on synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Supplementation of curcumin in the diet dramatically reduced oxidative damage and normalized levels of BDNF, synapsin I, and CREB that had been altered after TBI. Furthermore, curcumin supplementation counteracted the cognitive impairment caused by TBI. These results are in agreement with previous evidence, showing that oxidative stress can affect the injured brain by acting through the BDNF system to affect synaptic plasticity and cognition. The fact that oxidative stress is an intrinsic component of the neurological sequel of TBI and other insults indicates that dietary antioxidant therapy is a realistic approach to promote protective mechanisms in the injured brain.

Exp Neurol. 2006 Feb;197(2):309-17.





Neuroprotective effect of curcumin in middle cerebral artery occlusion induced focal cerebral ischemia in rats.


Thiyagarajan M, Sharma SS.
Dept.Pharmacol.Toxicol., Natl.Inst.Pharmaceutical Edu. and Res.Sector 67, S.A.S. Nagar-160 062, Punjab, India.
 
Free radical induced neuronal damage is implicated in cerebral ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury and antioxidants are reported to have neuroprotective activity. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have proved the antioxidant potential of curcumin and its metabolites. Hence, in the present study the neuroprotective potential of curcumin was investigated in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) induced focal cerebral IR injury. 2 h of MCAO and 22 h of reperfusion resulted in the infarct volume of 210.39 +/- 31.25 mm3. Administration of curcumin 100 and 300 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min. after MCAO produced 37.23 +/- 5.10% and 46.39 +/- 10.23% (p < 0.05) reduction in infarct volume, respectively. Ischemia induced cerebral edema was reduced in a dose dependent manner. Curcumin at 300 mg/kg, i.p. produced 50.96 +/- 6.04% reduction in edema (p < 0.05) volume. Increase in lipid peroxidation after MCAO in ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere of brain was observed, which was reduced by curcumin (300 mg/kg, i.p.)-treatment. Decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity was observed in ipsilateral hemisphere of MCAO animal. Curcumin-treatment (300 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented IR injury mediated fall in glutathione peroxide activity. Peroxynitrite measured using rhodamine123 fluorescence and anti-nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence indicated increased peroxynitrite formation after IR insult. Curcumin-treatment reduced peroxynitrite formation and hence the extent of tyrosine nitration in the cytosolic proteins. These results suggest the neuroprotective potential of curcumin in cerebral ischemia and is mediated through its antioxidant activity.

Life Sci. 2004 Jan 9;74(8):969-85.




Soon curcumin preparations will be quite common
in any Intensive Care Unit of this Planet and
a heady scent of curry will invade all the
hospitals and rehabilitation facilities.
Maybe.



« Last Edit: 15/11/2007 22:19:09 by iko »
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #40 on: 16/11/2007 03:44:04 »
I couldn't agree more..

I am also thrilled my supplement contains this wonder element, and CoQ10 also.
 

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« Reply #41 on: 20/11/2007 18:26:38 »
 According to a new study from Harvard, men who supplement with beta-carotene long-term may experience a slower rate of age- related cognitive decline.

Beta-carotene supplementation long-term may delay mental decline

In a newly published study, researchers tested the cognitive function of participants in the Physicians' Health Study II (PHSII), a continuation of the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) trial looking at the effects of beta-carotene and other vitamin supplements on chronic disease. The subjects included participants from the original PHS (started in 1982) and newer recruits from 1998.

The researchers tested the general cognition, verbal memory, and category fluency of 5,956 participants, including 4,052 participants from the PHS with a minimum supplementation period of 18 years.

Among the 1,904 newly recruited subjects (average supplementation of 1 year) no differences in cognition were evident whether they took beta-carotene or the placebo.

However, among the long-term supplement users from the PHS, the mean global score (average of all tests) was significantly higher in the beta carotene group than in the placebo. On verbal memory, men receiving long-term beta carotene supplementation also performed significantly better than the placebo group. The potential mechanism for the protective effects could be related to the role of vitamin A and beta-carotene on beta-amyloid protein production in the brain. The build-up of plaque from beta-amyloid deposits is associated with oxidative stress, cell death, and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.

The study is the first to look at long-term antioxidant supplementation in relation to a decline in cognitive function that occurs naturally with age, and that precedes diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(20):2184-2190.
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #42 on: 05/12/2007 14:09:33 »
...beta-carotene has no taste or flavour.
Go for smelly stuff to get major results!  ;D

Antisocial effects compensated by anti-Alzheimer properties?


Anti-amyloidogenic activity of S-allyl-l-cysteine and its activity to destabilize Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibrils in vitro.


Gupta VB, Rao KS.
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570020, India.

Alzheimer's disease involves Abeta accumulation, oxidative damage and inflammation and there is currently no clinically accepted treatment to stop its progression. Its risk is known to reduce with increased consumption of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents. Fibrillar aggregates of Abeta are major constituents of the senile plaques found in the brains of AD patients and have been related to AD neurotoxicity. It is reported that SAC (S-allyl-l-cysteine), a water-soluble organosulfur component present in garlic is known to prevent cognitive decline by protecting neurons from Abeta induced neuronal apoptosis. Hence, we investigated the effects of SAC on Abeta aggregation by employing Thioflavin-T, transmission electron microscopy, SDS-PAGE, size exclusion-HPLC. Under aggregating conditions in vitro, SAC dose-dependently inhibited Abeta fibrillation and also destabilized preformed Abeta fibrils. Further, Circular dichroism and fluorescence quenching studies supported the binding ability of SAC to Abeta and inducing a partially folded conformation in Abeta. The 3D structure of Abeta-SAC complex was also predicted employing automated docking studies.

Neurosci Lett. 2007 Sep 29 [Epub ahead of print]





Garlic Festival 2003.



« Last Edit: 28/04/2008 22:07:41 by iko »
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #43 on: 09/12/2007 03:13:14 »
New research indicates that low serum vitamin D may be associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer.


Vitamin D and endometrial cancer

The November 16, 2007 issue of the journal Preventive Medicine reported an association between ultraviolet light exposure and a reduced risk of endometrial cancer. Two previous investigations have already linked a lower rate of kidney and ovarian cancer with greater UV exposure, which increases the formation of vitamin D3 in the body.

Researchers analyzed data made available through GLOBOCAN, a database of cancer incidence and mortality in 175 countries. In general, the incidence of endometrial cancer was highest at the highest latitudes in both hemispheres. The correlation between low UV exposure and low vitamin D levels and endometrial cancer incidence remained strong even after adjusting for variables such as fat intake, weight, cloud cover, skin pigmentation and others.

Most previous studies have focused on hormone levels and dietary fat intake and their role in the development of the disease. This is the first study linking low serum vitamin D levels to an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Along with other preventive measures, vitamin D adequacy should be considered as part of a comprehensive program for prevention of endometrial cancer.

Prev Med 2007 Nov;45(5):323-4.
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #44 on: 09/12/2007 03:30:48 »
Iko,

The garlic thing sounds very promising.  Have there been clinic studies or just in vitro.  Beta- Carotene my not be smelly but it has shown evidence in human beings to work it's magic and how easy is it to find in easy to take, not to mention, dosage controlled form.  There are garlic supplements but according to the FDA the dosage is approximate unless you find a manufacturer that uses pharmaceutical standards.  I know there is at least one that has beta-carotene but I don't think I have seen one for garlic supplements.
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #45 on: 09/12/2007 11:16:26 »
Hi Melinda1958,

evidence of beta-carotene benefits in humans seems
to be a matter of debate, still far away from a well
defined scientific demonstration:


Persistence of contradicted claims in the literature.


Tatsioni A, Bonitsis NG, Ioannidis JP.
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.

CONTEXT: Some research findings based on observational epidemiology are contradicted by randomized trials, but may nevertheless still be supported in some scientific circles.
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the change over time in the content of citations for 2 highly cited epidemiological studies that proposed major cardiovascular benefits associated with vitamin E in 1993; and to understand how these benefits continued being defended in the literature, despite strong contradicting evidence from large randomized clinical trials (RCTs). To examine the generalizability of these findings, we also examined the extent of persistence of supporting citations for the highly cited and contradicted protective effects of beta-carotene on cancer and of estrogen on Alzheimer disease.
DATA SOURCES: For vitamin E, we sampled articles published in 1997, 2001, and 2005 (before, early, and late after publication of refuting evidence) that referenced the highly cited epidemiological studies and separately sampled articles published in 2005 and referencing the major contradicting RCT (HOPE trial). We also sampled articles published in 2006 that referenced highly cited articles proposing benefits associated with beta-carotene for cancer (published in 1981 and contradicted long ago by RCTs in 1994-1996) and estrogen for Alzheimer disease (published in 1996 and contradicted recently by RCTs in 2004).
DATA EXTRACTION: The stance of the citing articles was rated as favorable, equivocal, and unfavorable to the intervention. We also recorded the range of counterarguments raised to defend effectiveness against contradicting evidence. RESULTS: For the 2 vitamin E epidemiological studies, even in 2005, 50% of citing articles remained favorable. A favorable stance was independently less likely in more recent articles, specifically in articles that also cited the HOPE trial (odds ratio for 2001, 0.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.19; P < .001] and the odds ratio for 2005, 0.06 [95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.24; P < .001], as compared with 1997), and in general/internal medicine vs specialty journals. Among articles citing the HOPE trial in 2005, 41.4% were unfavorable. In 2006, 62.5% of articles referencing the highly cited article that had proposed beta-carotene and 61.7% of those referencing the highly cited article on estrogen effectiveness were still favorable; 100% and 96%, respectively, of the citations appeared in specialty journals; and citations were significantly less favorable (P = .001 and P = .009, respectively) when the major contradicting trials were also mentioned. Counterarguments defending vitamin E or estrogen included diverse selection and information biases and genuine differences across studies in participants, interventions, cointerventions, and outcomes.
Favorable citations to beta-carotene, long after evidence contradicted its effectiveness, did not consider the contradicting evidence.
CONCLUSION: Claims from highly cited observational studies persist and continue to be supported in the medical literature despite strong contradictory evidence from randomized trials.

JAMA. 2007 Dec 5;298(21):2517-26.



When you rely mostly on epidemiological evidences,
I think there are good reasons to be skeptical in
considering selected, purified substances instead
of the natural nutrients containing them:




Speaking of why giving stinky "cod" instead of specific synthetic substances, let's borrow this note from the anti-oxidant topic of the Forum:

quote:

A quote from the article is "Just because a food with a certain compound in it is beneficial to health, it does not mean a pill with the same compound in is"


That's exactly right. A pill sometimes works better than the original food and viceversa.

 
Scientists versus Mother Nature and her tricks


In the late '70s researchers opened their enormous freezers where thousands of serum samples from blood donors had been stocked since over 10yrs before. They wanted to test vitamin A concentration (knowing that it is well preserved in frozen samples) and look for a correlation with cancer incidence in those individuals. Experimental data in animals had demonstrated a positive effect of retinoic acid on precancerous lesions.
They found a strong inverse relation between vitamin A concentration and risk of tumor. All the media started recommending vitamin A to prevent or even fight cancer.
Few years later a proper RCT (randomized clinical trial) was started: a group of nurses and doctors took either a certain dose of vitamin A or a placebo every day for years. The conclusion of the study was disappointing: no difference in cancer incidence with or without vitamin A.

Some clever mind offered an explanation for this: vitamin A had been found increased in blood donors who had lower risk of cancer because it had been eaten together with some other more effective anticancer compounds.
Here we go with all the broccoli, cabbage, cauliflowers and so on...they are rich of vitamin A and probably have other mysterious anticancer factors.

iko



Addendum:
Vitamin A instead of cod liver oil would play the same trick...if you gave vit.A to patients because the ones taking 'cod' had higher levels of retinoic acid in their blood and were doing better (hypothesis!), you could get poor results because you are not giving together Vit.D and a bit of omega-3 fatty acids, the original recipe.

:mudneddA
Vitamin D instead of cod liver oil would play the same trick...if you gave vit.D to patients because the ones taking 'cod' had higher levels of vitamin D3 in their blood and were doing better (hypothesis!), you could get poor results because you are not giving together Vit.A and a bit of omega-3 fatty acids, the original recipe.



Conclusions:

The reason why only CLO should be recommended in childhood leukemia as a nutritional support is that we have unconfirmed, neglected, and perhaps weak evidence of its efficacy thanks to a study published in 1988.

But we do have it and we should use it for our patients' sake.

The alternative use of one or more components of CLO separately, suggested by anyone's deductions or thoughts, should be considered unsubstantiated and empirical.

This level of evidence is obviously useless in the case of toxic and expensive drugs that require properly arranged experimental tests before being approved and used in patients.

On the contrary, weak evidence should be quite enough in the case of nontoxic and inexpensive nutritional supplements (especially those historically-safe like cod liver oil).


Parents do not need to ask a doctor or get a recipe
before giving a glass of orange juice and/or
cod liver oil caps to their children,
either they are healthy or sick.


iko   




« Last Edit: 12/12/2007 12:05:40 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #46 on: 26/01/2008 16:40:32 »



Vitamin suppliments...or supplements, if you prefer.
Talking about nutrients or nutrigenomics, as they call
it these days.
Curcumin research is giving promising results indeed:


A Broadly Neuroprotective Derivative of Curcumin.

Liu Y, Dargusch R, Maher P, Schubert D.
The Salk Institute, Laboratories for Cellular Neurobiology, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037-1099, USA.

The plant polyphenolic curcumin alters the response of nerve cells to some forms of toxic stress. The steroid-like compound, cyclohexyl-bisphenol A, has broad neuroprotective properties that are very distinct from those of curcumin. To incorporate both families of biological activities into a single molecule, a pyrazole derivative of curcumin, called CNB-001, was synthesized. CNB-001 acquires a new activity and is far superior in neuroprotection assays to either parental molecule, but retains some of the properties of both. It is neuroprotective in cell culture assays for trophic factor withdrawal, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and glucose starvation, as well as toxicity from both intracellular and extracellular amyloid. While the creation of CNB-001 was based upon an uncommon approach to drug design, it has the potential of a lead drug candidate for treating multiple conditions involving nerve cell death.

Neurochem. 2008 Jan 18 [Epub ahead of print]


« Last Edit: 26/01/2008 19:02:49 by iko »
 

Offline Melinda1958

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« Reply #47 on: 04/05/2008 02:27:59 »
A recent study has generated negative headlines worldwide and caused consumers to question the efficacy and safety of antioxidant supplements. Many health professionals and nutrition experts have been highly critical of this study, and they have been quick to respond with refuting analyses and firm rebuttals.


When "recent studies" contradict conventional wisdom

Earlier this month, an updated meta-analysis was published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews entitled Antioxidant supplements for prevention of mortality in healthy participants and patients with various diseases. Almost immediately, scores of headlines and articles appeared stating that antioxidant vitamins were not only useless, but that they also shorten life span.

The Cochrane study is not new research. Rather, it is a slightly adjusted version of a meta-analysis published in 2007 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That JAMA study received very stern criticism at the time of its publishing for many of its methods and conclusions, and this newer version of the study hasn't been any better received.

But unfortunately, with the onslaught of sensationalist headlines and scare tactics it is often difficult for the average person to know what to believe, and even harder to know how to defend those beliefs. To make matters worse, health professionals and physicians are often just as susceptible to these scare tactics, and many seldom get past the headlines, making it even more difficult to discuss nutrition, diet, and preventive health in a reasonable manner.

What follows are links to analyses and rebuttals of the most recent Cochrane study. A greater understanding of this and similar studies should assist you in future discussions with your contacts and health professionals.

Council For Responsible Nutrition (CRN) comments and analysis.

newbielink:http://www.crnusa.org/CRNPR_08_AntioxidantStudy041608.html [nonactive]

newbielink:http://www.crnusa.org/pdfs/CRN_Analysis_AntioxidantStudy_041608.pdf [nonactive]

Stephen Daniells, PhD, the science editor for NutraIngredients.com and FoodNavigator.com. Dr. Daniells received a PhD in chemistry from Queen's University of Belfast.

newbielink:http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/ng.asp?n=84792-meta-analysis-antioxidants-randomised-clinical-trials [nonactive]


 

Offline iko

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« Reply #48 on: 26/05/2008 22:12:09 »
better and better news from 'curcuminized' scientists:


Curcumin inhibits proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of different cancers through interaction with multiple cell signaling proteins.


Kunnumakkara AB, Anand P, Aggarwal BB.
Cytokine Research Laboratory, Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Because most cancers are caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different genes, agents that target multiple gene products are needed for prevention and treatment of cancer. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent in turmeric, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activity.
These include inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, transcription factors, and gene products linked with cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis.
Curcumin has been found to inhibit the proliferation of various tumor cells in culture, prevents carcinogen-induced cancers in rodents, and inhibits the growth of human tumors in xenotransplant or orthotransplant animal models either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents or radiation. Several phase I and phase II clinical trials indicate that curcumin is quite safe and may exhibit therapeutic efficacy. These aspects of curcumin are discussed further in detail in this review.

Cancer Lett. 2008 May 12. [Epub ahead of print]








 

Offline iko

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« Reply #49 on: 04/08/2008 15:09:41 »




Potential therapeutic effects of curcumin, the anti-inflammatory agent, against neurodegenerative,
cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases.


Aggarwal BB, Harikumar KB.
Cytokine Research Laboratory, Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States.

Although safe in most cases, ancient treatments are ignored because neither their active component nor their molecular targets are well defined. This is not the case, however, with curcumin, a yellow-pigment substance and component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), which was identified more than a century ago. For centuries it has been known that turmeric exhibits anti-inflammatory activity, but extensive research performed within the past two decades has shown that the this activity of turmeric is due to curcumin, a diferuloylmethane. This agent has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, protein kinases, adhesion molecules, redox status and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. The process of inflammation has been shown to play a major role in most chronic illnesses, including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. In the current review, we provide evidence for the potential role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of various proinflammatory chronic diseases.
These features, combined with the pharmacological safety and negligible cost, render curcumin an attractive agent to explore further.

Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2008 Jul 9.


 

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