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Author Topic: Garlic Miracle  (Read 63808 times)

Heronumber0

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« Reply #25 on: 03/08/2007 16:25:47 »
Brilliant stuff here. I don't doubt the efficacy of the Science. However a question comes to mind - what dosage of allicin is needed for those miraculous antibacterial or anti-cancer effects? And, how many tablets of garlic available from the chemists does that correspond to? i think what I am saying is about the transfer of in vitro science to in vivo studies and the amount of allicin in commercially available garlic tablets from the supermarket.
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #26 on: 03/08/2007 22:45:49 »
Hi Heronumber0,

of course those are good questions; I think that most of the work has still to be done to follow our strict scientific standards for clinical investigation. 
Plenty of experimental studies in animals are already available in the medical literature.
As far as anti-infectious applications are concerned, the recent data from the U.K. group of investigators -previously reported here- could be directly used by other teams.
Chinese doctors may offer help and experience.  A bone marrow transplant team in Beijing reported the use of garlic preparations against CMV and other infections, suggesting positive effects.
In my personal opinion,  the whole issue might easily go on being neglected for the years to come. 
No patent, no funding, no research, no result: everything slows down.
Maybe.

ikoD

Brilliant stuff here. I don't doubt the efficacy of the Science. However a question comes to mind - what dosage of allicin is needed for those miraculous antibacterial or anti-cancer effects? And, how many tablets of garlic available from the chemists does that correspond to? i think what I am saying is about the transfer of in vitro science to in vivo studies and the amount of allicin in commercially available garlic tablets from the supermarket.

P.S.
The aim of this thread is not to claim miracle effects, but further help in standard treatments.
I probably exaggerated in saying that this issue is neglected:

Garlic              = 2699citations on PubMed today
Garlic and cancer   = 478
Curcumin and cancer = 725
cod liver oil and leukemia = 1
« Last Edit: 25/08/2007 18:03:17 by iko »
 

Heronumber0

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« Reply #27 on: 04/08/2007 00:19:37 »
Thanks for that iko. Do you think 6 tablets/capsules with a concentration of garlic extract at 200mg/ml (approximately) taken 6 times a day would be sufficient to keep systemic allicin levels high enough?
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #28 on: 04/08/2007 11:22:32 »
As I mentioned before, there is not enough information
about garlic preparations, dosages and treatment protocols.
I am no expert whatsoever: I post these reports to let you
know that something good may hide behind these simple old-
fashioned remedies.
If you want to give it a try, it's up to you to find out
proper information and go...under your full responsability.

Here we may discuss whether these reports are consistent
enough, have other scientific contributions from NKSmembers,
make this issue a bit less neglected.

ikoD
 

Heronumber0

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« Reply #29 on: 04/08/2007 11:40:40 »
I'm not trying to pressure you ikoD, I just wondered if we would receive enough allicin from taking garlic supplements on a daily basis. Thank you for posting real data and that is very valuable to make a balanced judgement. Keep on posting because this stuff really interests me.

Of course if I start to take on garlic treatment I will take full responsibility for it. I think we have to consider the active ingredient allicin in the garlic pills and they probably differ depending on the method of preparation.  I will have to get off my backside and do my own research.

Thanks for your answer
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #30 on: 04/08/2007 16:08:21 »
I'm not trying to pressure you ikoD, I just wondered if we would receive enough allicin from taking garlic supplements on a daily basis. Thank you for posting real data and that is very valuable to make a balanced judgement. Keep on posting because this stuff really interests me.

Of course if I start to take on garlic treatment I will take full responsibility for it. I think we have to consider the active ingredient allicin in the garlic pills and they probably differ depending on the method of preparation.  I will have to get off my backside and do my own research.

Thanks for your answer


Hi Heronumber0,

Thanks for your encouraging reply.
Voilà garlic people!
This is quite recent stuff
about allicin from Israel:

The antiatherogenic effect of allicin: possible mode of action.

Gonen A, Harats D, Rabinkov A, Miron T, Mirelman D, Wilchek M, Weiner L, Ulman E, Levkovitz H, Ben-Shushan D, Shaish A.
Institute of Lipid and Atherosclerosis Research, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

OBJECTIVE: Garlic (Allium sativum) has been suggested to affect several cardiovascular risk factors. Its antiatherosclerotic properties are mainly attributed to allicin that is produced upon crushing of the garlic clove. Most previous studies used various garlic preparations in which allicin levels were not well defined. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of pure allicin on atherogenesis in experimental mouse models.
METHODS AND RESULTS: Daily dietary supplement of allicin, 9 mg/kg body weight, reduced the atherosclerotic plaque area by 68.9 and 56.8% in apolipoprotein E-deficient and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor knockout mice, respectively, as compared with control mice. LDL isolated from allicin-treated groups was more resistant to CuSO(4)-induced oxidation ex vivo than LDL isolated from control mice. Incubation of mouse plasma with (3)H-labeled allicin showed binding of allicin to lipoproteins. By using electron spin resonance, we demonstrated reduced Cu(2+) binding to LDL following allicin treatment. LDL treatment with allicin significantly inhibited both native LDL and oxidized LDL degradation by isolated mouse macrophages.

CONCLUSIONS: By using a pure allicin preparation, we were able to show that allicin may affect atherosclerosis not only by acting as an antioxidant, but also by other mechanisms, such as lipoprotein modification and inhibition of LDL uptake and degradation by macrophages.

Pathobiology. 2005;72(6):325-34.




click down here for alliin formula and cooking properties of garlic:
http://www.chemistryland.com/CHM107/EarlyChemistry/PreservationChemistry/PreservationChemistryQuestions.html



« Last Edit: 06/08/2007 13:54:58 by iko »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #31 on: 14/08/2007 13:57:09 »
Iko, I enjoyed reading about garlic and having used it for many years to combat bugs anti mosquito replant, de worming, and de fleeing dogs along with many other uses it does make one think why nothing has been done to test this amazing vegetable further. The use as an affective wart treatment suggests it’s antifungal and antiviral properties may be far reaching.

I love to eat wild garlic flowers and stems while walking my dogs that aromatic smell fills the whole of the woodland, and the dogs are partial to the odd mouthful also. I very often push a clove of garlic into the flowerbeds, this helps to get rid of pesky critters and provides me with a free source of garlic J

Andrew
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #32 on: 14/08/2007 21:53:50 »
Iko, I enjoyed reading about garlic and having used it for many years to combat bugs anti mosquito replant, de worming, and de fleeing dogs along with many other uses it does make one think why nothing has been done to test this amazing vegetable further. The use as an affective wart treatment suggests it’s antifungal and antiviral properties may be far reaching.

I love to eat wild garlic flowers and stems while walking my dogs that aromatic smell fills the whole of the woodland, and the dogs are partial to the odd mouthful also. I very often push a clove of garlic into the flowerbeds, this helps to get rid of pesky critters and provides me with a free source of garlic J

Andrew


Hi Andrew,

I'm glad that you're interested in these garlic notes.
You're right, some more scientific effort towards this issue would be appreciated.  Nevertheless, something has been done and properly reported, more stuff will come in the near future.
We (garlic supporters) are ready to celebrate!
Take care

ikod   [^]
« Last Edit: 15/08/2007 11:37:31 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #33 on: 16/08/2007 22:17:28 »




Enhancement of the fungicidal activity of amphotericin B by allicin,
an allyl-sulfur compound from garlic, against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system.

Ogita A, Fujita K, Taniguchi M, Tanaka T.
Institute for Health and Sport Sciences, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimo-to, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585, Japan.

Amphotericin B (AmB) is a representative antibiotic for the control of serious fungal infections, and its fungicidal activity was greatly enhanced by allicin, an allyl-sulfur compound from garlic. In addition to the plasma membrane permeability change, AmB induced vacuole membrane damage so that the organelles were visible as small discrete particles. Although allicin was ineffective in promoting AmB-induced plasma membrane disability, this compound enhanced AmB-induced structural damage to the vacuolar membrane even at a non-lethal dose of the antibiotic. Allicin could also enhance the antifungal activity of AmB against the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and against Aspergillus fumigatus. In contrast, allicin did not enhance the cytotoxic activity of AmB against cells of human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60), a vacuole-less organism.

Planta Med. 2006 Oct;72(13):1247-50. Epub 2006 Aug 10.


 

Offline Gurugirl

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« Reply #34 on: 28/08/2007 02:19:59 »
What is the best brand of garlic to get that doesn't taste and make you burp garlic?
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #35 on: 28/08/2007 19:07:22 »
What is the best brand of garlic to get that doesn't taste and make you burp garlic?

Hi Gurugirl,

I have no idea. Commercial garlic pills are from so many brands...it's up to you to choose and trust the producer.  Not exactly 100% sure, but I knew that most active substances are sulphur compounds and smelly: so, no smell no good!
Maybe.

ikoD  [:o)]


« Last Edit: 02/01/2008 22:41:10 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #36 on: 03/10/2007 10:03:09 »
...talking about garlic and 'kitchen medicine'...





Curcumin as "Curecumin": From kitchen to clinic.

Goel A, Kunnumakkara AB, Aggarwal BB.
Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Laboratory, Department of Internal Medicine, Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center and Baylor Research Institute, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States.

Although turmeric (Curcuma longa; an Indian spice) has been described in Ayurveda, as a treatment for inflammatory diseases and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, a yellow pigment present in turmeric (curry powder) has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins. Curcumin also downregulates cyclin D1, cyclin E and MDM2; and upregulates p21, p27, and p53. Various preclinical cell culture and animal studies suggest that curcumin has potential as an antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antiangiogenic agent; as a mediator of chemoresistance and radioresistance; as a chemopreventive agent; and as a therapeutic agent in wound healing, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, and arthritis. Pilot phase I clinical trials have shown curcumin to be safe even when consumed at a daily dose of 12g for 3 months. Other clinical trials suggest a potential therapeutic role for curcumin in diseases such as familial adenomatous polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, hypercholesteremia, atherosclerosis, pancreatitis, psoriasis, chronic anterior uveitis and arthritis. Thus, curcumin, a spice once relegated to the kitchen shelf, has moved into the clinic and may prove to be "Curecumin".

Biochem Pharmacol. 2007 Aug 19;


« Last Edit: 03/10/2007 17:59:12 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #37 on: 24/10/2007 21:55:27 »
Garlic news...

Quote

High-Garlic Diet Can Help Heart Performance And Chances Of Avoiding Cancer

Monday October 22, 2007
CityNews.ca Staff

Sure it can make your breath smell like something awful, but scientific research suggests a healthy daily helping of garlic can go do a lot when it comes to helping your health.

The foremost effects are on the heart, where garlic boosts the body's supply of hydrogen sulfide, which protects one of the most important organs.

"Garlic actually relaxes blood cells, so the vessels and the blood cells become more plastic and more elastic," said Jennifer Sygo, a registered dietician with the Cleveland Clinic.

But it's not just good for the heart. A garlic-rich diet can protect against breast, prostate and colon cancer, medical experts suggest.

The bad news is that in order to get the full health benefits should be eaten raw, but if you or others can't stand the smell on your breath, the second best way is to crush it before cooking, which releases the food's healthy compounds.

Unfortunately though, when it comes to garlic, a little doesn't go a long way. Experts suggest a total of two cloves a day are needed to make noticeable improvements in one's diet, a smelly sacrifice not many are willing to make.

more from:  http://www.citynews.ca/news/news_15994.aspx


« Last Edit: 24/10/2007 22:08:00 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #38 on: 05/12/2007 13:50:21 »
Antisocial effects compensated by anti-Alzheimer properties?


Anti-amyloidogenic activity of S-allyl-l-cysteine and its activity to destabilize Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibrils in vitro.


Gupta VB, Rao KS.
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570020, India.

Alzheimer's disease involves Abeta accumulation, oxidative damage and inflammation and there is currently no clinically accepted treatment to stop its progression. Its risk is known to reduce with increased consumption of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents. Fibrillar aggregates of Abeta are major constituents of the senile plaques found in the brains of AD patients and have been related to AD neurotoxicity. It is reported that SAC (S-allyl-l-cysteine), a water-soluble organosulfur component present in garlic is known to prevent cognitive decline by protecting neurons from Abeta induced neuronal apoptosis. Hence, we investigated the effects of SAC on Abeta aggregation by employing Thioflavin-T, transmission electron microscopy, SDS-PAGE, size exclusion-HPLC. Under aggregating conditions in vitro, SAC dose-dependently inhibited Abeta fibrillation and also destabilized preformed Abeta fibrils. Further, Circular dichroism and fluorescence quenching studies supported the binding ability of SAC to Abeta and inducing a partially folded conformation in Abeta. The 3D structure of Abeta-SAC complex was also predicted employing automated docking studies.

Neurosci Lett. 2007 Sep 29 [Epub ahead of print]





Garlic Festival 2003.


« Last Edit: 05/12/2007 14:04:59 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #39 on: 20/01/2008 15:53:53 »
A definitive role in supportive treatment in oncology is far away to come...


S-Allylcysteine reduces breast tumor cell adhesion and invasion.



Gapter LA, Yuin OZ, Ng KY.
Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 18 Science Drive 4, Building S4, Singapore 117543, Republic of Singapore.

Previous studies show that aqueous garlic extract and its derivatives (e.g. S-allylcysteine [SAC]) prevent carcinogen-induced breast tumorigenesis.
However, investigations testing the effect of SAC on later stages of breast tumorigenesis and/or metastasis have produced mixed results. Here we show that SAC significantly reduced anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, and sub-lethal SAC-treatment altered mammary tumor cell adhesion and invasion through components of the extracellular matrix. We provide evidence to suggest increased expression of E-cadherin and reduced MMP-2 expression and activity are partially responsible for inhibition of mammary tumor cell invasion by SAC. Because E-cadherin and MMP-2 are important in cancer metastasis, these results suggest a link between SAC induction of E-cadherin and reduction of MMP2 activity with the inhibition of cell motility and invasion; thus providing evidence that events leading to breast cancer metastasis are repressed by sub-lethal SAC-treatment.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2008 Jan 9 [Epub ahead of print]


« Last Edit: 20/01/2008 15:55:47 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #40 on: 07/07/2008 21:16:51 »
This is great news from China:
garlic was supposed to PREVENT
stomach cancer in the long run...
So this is much more than expected!
(can you all read Chinese?)



[Effect of local application of allicinvia gastroscopy on cell proliferation and apoptosis of progressive gastric carcinoma]
[Article in Chinese]


Zhang ZD, Li Y, Jiao ZK, et al .
Department of General Surgery, Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang.

OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of local application of allicin via gastroscopy on progressive gastric carcinoma, and to investigate its possible mechanisms. METHODS: Eighty patients with progressive gastric adenocarcinoma, whose diagnosis was confirmed by gastroscopy and pathological examination, were assigned to 2 groups, 40 in each group. Forty-eight hours before operation, allicin was infused via gastroscopy to the lesion region of patients in the allicin group, and normal saline was infused instead to those in the control group. The gastric carcinoma tissue gotten from gastrectomy was taken to determine the percentage of cells in various cell cycle phases ( G0/ G1, S and G2/M), the cell apoptosis rate, proliferation index value and apoptosis related gene protein such as Fas, Bax and Bcl-2 by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In the allicin group, the cell apoptosis rate was 9.60 +/- 1.52%, the percentage of cell in G0/G1 phase was 72.12 +/- 8.35%, in G2/M phase 9.54 +/- 3.20%, and PI 27.80 +/- 8.35, while in the control group, the corresponding data was 2.20 +/- 0.58%, 69.56 +/- 5.15%, 13.20 +/- 3.05%, and 30.40 +/- 5.15, respectively, and significant difference in all the 4 indexes could be found between the two groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Moreover, allicin showed effects in up-regulating the protein expressions of apoptosis promoting gene Bax and apoptosis initiating gene Fas (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and down-regulating that of anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-2 (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSION: Local application of allicin via gastroscopy can inhibit the cell growth and proliferation of progressive gastric carcinoma, and can also promote gastric carcinoma cell apoptosis.

Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. 2008 Feb;28(2):108-10.




« Last Edit: 07/07/2008 21:35:13 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #41 on: 08/07/2008 22:36:57 »
WOW!! That is really good news in that study and do you think it will become a treatment? How many more studies do they have to use to impact the medical treatment as far as becoming a viable recommended treatment?
 

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« Reply #42 on: 08/07/2008 22:50:06 »
WOW!! That is really good news in that study and do you think it will become a treatment? How many more studies do they have to use to impact the medical treatment as far as becoming a viable recommended treatment?

Hi Karen,

I think this is just a start: further studies are needed...
Well, talking about such a simple substance like allicin,
this is great news indeed!
Take care

ikoD
 

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« Reply #43 on: 08/07/2008 22:56:18 »
Thanks IKO.. You too!
 

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« Reply #44 on: 05/08/2008 15:06:23 »
From Mendoza, Argentina, and Madison, Wisconsin USA,
a cooperation study to demonstrate that some medical
properties of garlic are preserved after short cooking
of the crushed cloves:


Effect of cooking on garlic (Allium sativum L.) antiplatelet activity and thiosulfinates content.


Cavagnaro PF, Camargo A, Galmarini CR, Simon PW.
INTA - EEA La Consulta and CONICET, INTA, EEA La Consulta CC8, San Carlos, Mendoza (5567), Argentina.

The raw form of garlic and some of its preparations are widely recognized as antiplatelet agents that may contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Herein, we examined the in-vitro antiaggregatory activity (IVAA) of human blood platelets induced by extracts of garlic samples that were previously heated (in the form of crushed versus uncrushed cloves) using different cooking methods and intensities. The concentrations of allicin and pyruvate, two predictors of antiplatelet strength, were also monitored. Oven-heating at 200 degrees C or immersing in boiling water for 3 min or less did not affect the ability of garlic to inhibit platelet aggregation (as compared to raw garlic), whereas heating for 6 min completely suppressed IVAA in uncrushed, but not in previously crushed, samples. The latter samples had reduced, yet significant, antiplatelet activity. Prolonged incubation (more than 10 min) at these temperatures completely suppressed IVAA. Microwaved garlic had no effect on platelet aggregation. However, increasing the concentration of garlic juice in the aggregation reaction had a positive IVAA dose response in crushed, but not in uncrushed, microwaved samples. The addition of raw garlic juice to microwaved uncrushed garlic restored a full complement of antiplatelet activity that was completely lost without the garlic addition. Garlic-induced IVAA was always associated with allicin and pyruvate levels.
Our results suggest that (1) allicin and thiosulfinates are responsible for the IVAA response, (2) crushing garlic before moderate cooking can reduce the loss of activity, and (3) the partial loss of antithrombotic effect in crushed-cooked garlic may be compensated by increasing the amount consumed.

J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Feb 21;55(4):1280-8. Epub 2007 Jan 27.



free access online:   http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi/jafcau/2007/55/i04/abs/jf062587s.html
« Last Edit: 02/09/2008 10:05:12 by iko »
 

Offline shalmedsimm

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« Reply #45 on: 22/12/2010 06:23:36 »
Garlic is known as nature wonder drug. It has got all the antibiotic, antiviral and anti-fungal characteristics.
 

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« Reply #45 on: 22/12/2010 06:23:36 »

 

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