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Author Topic: acquiring someone elses DNA  (Read 9341 times)

paul.fr

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« on: 24/04/2007 07:34:46 »
If i had a blood transfusion, or was given bone marrow would i acquire enough of the other persons DNA to change my own? If i would, in what way, if, any would i notice it?

Could i be convicted of a crime, say, if the person was a murderer and i now had some of their DNA?


 

another_someone

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #1 on: 24/04/2007 09:09:45 »
This crosses over with the discussion on Heart Transplants at http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7264.0

At present, the whole concept that the DNA in a transplanted organ or blood transfussion (the latter case in any case now removes a lot of cellular content in order to limit the possibility of disease transmission) is not generally accepted by the mainstream, although it clearly has some proponents.

The problem of medically induced criminality does not only apply to risks (whether they exist or not) regarding transplants.  Any major brain trauma runs the risk of inducing personality changes, as does exposure to some chemicals (I remember a long time ago a documentary suggesting that some insecticides might possibly cause violent behavior - these are the organophosphate group of insecticides that are related to nerve gases).
 

Offline Ben6789

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #2 on: 24/04/2007 16:27:50 »
I see..
 

Offline that mad man

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #3 on: 24/04/2007 20:07:10 »
In Europe or the UK you could possibly be convicted but in the USA I don't think DNA evidence is allowed as its not 100% proof positive or reliable.

But now think of the other aspect, framing someone for a murder. All it would need is for someone to take some samples of your DNA and place them at a crime scene, providing the homework is done first it would be hard to disprove.

DNA is a like a logbook of how you were made and any changes in DNA don't take effect until reproduction where it is then passed on, so I doubt if it would affect you as you are already made.

Incidentally, my brother has Myeloma and I was to give him my bone marrow or stem cells last year as I was a tissue match. Because of circumstances he got my sisters stem cells so If he starts dressing weird I will know what's up!
PS the transplant was a success.  ;D

Bee

 

another_someone

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #4 on: 24/04/2007 21:04:21 »
Glad to hear the transplant was a success.

The point about DNA only being relevant to how you are made is too simplistic in two ways.

Firstly, you are constantly being remade - which is why we have stem cells (which were the cells in the bone marrow that would have been transplanted from your sister - if your sister's bone marrow was not being remade, then she would now be short of bone marrow).

Secondly, DNA not only effects how the cells divide and differentiate, they also control how they create proteins on a minute by minute, second by second, basis - and they change the way they behave by switching genes on and off as required.

If the genes in DNA were truly unable to effect how the body responded after the point of birth, then gene therapy would be a futile attempt to improve the health of the patient.
 

Offline that mad man

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #5 on: 25/04/2007 14:20:29 »


If the genes in DNA were truly unable to effect how the body responded after the point of birth, then gene therapy would be a futile attempt to improve the health of the patient.

A very good point although I didn't think that it is very successful or being generally used yet because of the possible links to patients developing Leukaemia?

Bee
 

another_someone

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #6 on: 25/04/2007 16:16:33 »


If the genes in DNA were truly unable to effect how the body responded after the point of birth, then gene therapy would be a futile attempt to improve the health of the patient.

A very good point although I didn't think that it is very successful or being generally used yet because of the possible links to patients developing Leukaemia?

Bee

Indeed, but that the effort has unwanted effects is not to detract from the fact that the efforts has an effect.  On the contrary, it is not that there is no effect, but that it has more effects than merely the desired effect.

Nonetheless, from what I understand, early indications are that it does achieve the desired effect, only that we have not yet managed to control the undesired effects.
 

Offline tony6789

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #7 on: 25/04/2007 18:00:07 »
i cud b a diffrent person!!!!yay!!! how about neil peart? yea!!
 

Offline Ben6789

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acquiring someone elses DNA
« Reply #8 on: 17/05/2007 16:45:51 »
Dream on, psycho. :P You gotta earn that.  [8D]
 

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acquiring someone elses DNA
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