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Offline janetah

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Fibrosing Alveolitis
« on: 27/04/2007 17:40:50 »
My dad has just been diagnosed with fibrosing alveolitis.  It's bad enough having to be on oxygen 15 hours a day, but he's got a terrible cough, which is exhausting him.  The medication (steroids, immunosuppressants) don't seem to help and he's just finished a course of antiobiotics, which haven't affected it either.  Does anyone know of something which could help soothe it?


 

Offline iko

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« Reply #1 on: 27/04/2007 17:49:23 »
Hi janetah,         (where are you from?)

wish you better days than these...
You could ask Carolyn and see if your dad has a medical history similar to her mom's:
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=5263.0
Take care

ikod
« Last Edit: 27/04/2007 17:50:56 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #2 on: 30/04/2007 13:09:51 »
Thanks very much, ikod - I looked at Carolyn's post and will look into oregano oil. My dad smoked for about 30 years, though never heavily.  The hospital seemed to be more interested in the fact that he built a boat with a teak deck and was exposed to teak dust.

btw I'm from Surrey, UK.
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #3 on: 30/04/2007 15:13:00 »
Hi janetah from Surrey,UK

I just crossed "teak and dust" on PubMed, the Medline database I had been using for years, the 'right thing' for medical research.  Surprisingly enough it gives just 3 (three) citations!
It's a bit odd, you usually get a bulk of abstracts and free full-text articles even for the rarest thing in the world.
It seems to have an allergic, immune mediated inflammatory mechanism: with or without overlapping infectious agents.  Close to what Carolyn's mum has (fingers crossed).
This is one report, for a quick bite:


Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by wood dusts.

Estlander T, Jolanki R, Alanko K, Kanerva L.
Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland.

Exposure to wood dusts may cause various skin and mucosal symptoms. Allergic dermatoses, caused by wood dusts, diagnosed at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health during 1976-1999 are reported here. 16 had allergic contact dermatitis and, 2 had contact urticaria. 9 men (3 cabinet makers, 3 joiners, 1 carpenter, 1 knifemaker and 1 machinist) were mainly exposed to tropical hardwoods. 1 man had dermatitis caused by western red cedar. 5 patients, 3 men and 2 women, were exposed to Finnish pine or spruce dusts, and 1 man to aspen. 7 also had rhinitis, 4 asthma or dyspnoea and 3 conjunctivitis. On patch testing, 10 men reacted to 9 different wood dusts, including teak (5), palisander (3), jacaranda (2), mahogany (2), walnut (2) and obeche (1). Reactions to wood allergens, including lapachol (2), deoxylapachol (1), (R)-3,4-dimethoxydahlbergione (2), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (1), mansonone A (2) and salicyl alcohol (1), were noted in 4 cases. All but 1 of 5 patients exposed to pine or spruce dusts reacted to the sawdusts, all 5 to colophonium, 3 to abietic acid, 2 to tall oil resin, 3 to wood tar mix and 4 to other wood gum resins. Of the 2 CU patients, 1 was ***** and RAST positive to obeche, 1 reacted with urticarial dermatitis to punah wood dust on chamber exposure. Occupational allergic dermatoses are mainly caused by the dusts of hardwoods, mostly due to Type IV allergy, but may also be caused by softwood dusts. Patch tests can be done with wood dusts, but should be confirmed by patch testing with wood allergens if possible.

Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Apr;44(4):213-7.


me like Finland more and more.
They get plenty of cod liver oil up there...

ikod   [^]
« Last Edit: 30/04/2007 16:08:29 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Fibrosing Alveolitis
« Reply #4 on: 30/04/2007 16:18:02 »
Yap! me found something good for Complementary Med.
Promise to give me more diagnostic data and I'll lend
you this wonderful 'panacea' sort of thing in free-full-text!
http://ajrcmb.atsjournals.org/cgi/reprint/31/1/28
Cheers,

ikur  :)
« Last Edit: 30/04/2007 16:20:01 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #5 on: 01/05/2007 12:06:16 »
He did have quite bad dermatitis on his hands for a while at the time - was told that was the teak.  So fits with thsi Finnish report.
The cercumin link sounds very interesting. What diagnostic data would you like?

Thanks so much. :)
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #6 on: 01/05/2007 13:01:26 »
He did have quite bad dermatitis on his hands for a while at the time - was told that was the teak.  So fits with thsi Finnish report.
The curcumin link sounds very interesting. What diagnostic data would you like?

Thanks so much. :)

Hi janetah,

I am glad that you did appreciate the curcumin idea: it seems to be the 'panacea' of the new century.  No joke, if you check on PubMed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi you get almost 2000 citations with 147 reviews; quite extraordinary for a single substance, and most of the reports are recent and amazingly positive!
You can play "crossing" curcumin and...any dreadful and incurable ailment, you name it (e.g. pancreatic cancer) and...voilą! You find a promising report.
I am not your expert, but searching through fibrosing alveolitis I found that you have the 'cryptic' forms (no known causes) and those bound to scleroderma that is a severe autoimmune disease.  The curcumin paper reported above is actually related to scleroderma.
I'd like to know whether a form of scleroderma or 'systemic sclerosis' has been excluded in your dad's case.
Take care

ikur   [^] 

from: Spicy treatment for malaria?  here in Physiol.Med.
Quote
Malaria remains a major global health concern.
New, inexpensive, and effective antimalarial agents are urgently needed
.



Hey! The old Ayurvedal/Chinese medicine is finally joining western orthodox medicine and is already giving very promising results, perhaps thanks to the immigrants from Asia to the USA/UK who are now leading big research labs.
Curcumin alone (Turmeric) is being extensively tested for various dreadful human diseases: hundreds of scientific reports and astonishing data...
Let's curry on!

iko

...these news come from the original Continent:
 
Curcumin-artemisinin combination therapy for malaria.

Nandakumar DN, Nagaraj VA, Vathsala PG, Rangarajan P, Padmanaban G.
Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

Artemisinin and curcumin show an additive interaction in killing Plasmodium falciparum in culture. In vivo, 3 oral doses of curcumin following a single injection of alpha,beta-arteether to Plasmodium berghei-infected mice are able to prevent recrudescence due to alpha,beta-arteether monotherapy and ensure almost 100% survival of the animals.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2006 May;50(5):1859-60.
 



But this paper came first:

 
Curcumin for malaria therapy.

Reddy RC, Vatsala PG, Keshamouni VG, Padmanaban G, Rangarajan PN.
Dept.Int.Med.The Univ.Michigan Med.School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0360, USA.

Malaria remains a major global health concern. New, inexpensive, and effective antimalarial agents are urgently needed. Here we show that curcumin, a polyphenolic organic molecule derived from turmeric, inhibits chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture in a dose dependent manner with an IC(50) of approximately 5 microM. Additionally, oral administration of curcumin to mice infected with malaria parasite (Plasmodium berghei) reduces blood parasitemia by 80-90% and enhances their survival significantly. Thus, curcumin may represent a novel treatment for malarial infection.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005 Jan 14;326(2):472-4.




« Last Edit: 01/05/2007 13:23:36 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #7 on: 01/05/2007 14:40:22 »
Just so I understand the distinction: is the cryptic (no known cause) form one where there IS an external cause, e.g. teak dust, but it's not possible to identify exactly what it is.  And is the scleroderma related form one in which the alveolitis arises because of an internal malfunction in the immune system?

 

Offline iko

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« Reply #8 on: 01/05/2007 15:46:02 »
Just so I understand the distinction: is the cryptic (no known cause) form one where there IS an external cause, e.g. teak dust, but it's not possible to identify exactly what it is.  And is the scleroderma related form one in which the alveolitis arises because of an internal malfunction in the immune system?

Yes, cryptic = no known cause. Even scleroderma has no known cause (lots of theories anyway) but has gut, skin, internal organ involvement altogether.
Fibrosing alveolitis in scleroderma is probably not the only complaint.
Your dad may simply have fibrosing alveolitis caused by teak dust.
An abnormal, delayed overreaction to the irritating stimuli of inhaled teak particles.
I wish we knew how much his lung damage could be reversible now.
Searching more doesn't cost much

ikur  ;)


8 citations in Unbound MEDLINE for Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis curcumin[keywords]
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/ebm/search
Unfortunately all are still experimental (rats):

Effects of curcumin in treatment of experimental pulmonary fibrosis: A comparison with hydrocortisone.

Xu M, Deng B, Chow YL, Zhao ZZ, Hu B  

To compare curcumin with hydrocortisone for treating bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (BLMPF), four groups of rats were injected with 1.5mg/kg bleomycin intratracheally. Then the Group HC rats were treated with three injections of 2mg/kg hydrocortisone i.p.; Group CH and CL rats, respectively, were orally given 500 or 250mg/kg curcumin daily; and Group PC rats were given deionized water alone. After 28 days of treatment, lung samples were examined by H-E staining, Masson's staining and immunohistochemical analyses and pulmonary type I collagen (Col-I), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) were determined by Western blotting and real-time RT PCR analyses. The results showed that (1) Group PC rats had histopathological characteristics of BLMPF with significant increase in their protein/mRNA expressions of Col-I (+114%/+173%), iNOS (+146%/+523%) and TGF-beta1 (+476%/+527%) (P<0.01); (2) in Group HC, CH and CL rats, protein/mRNA expressions of Col-I (-39%/-52%, -31%/-57%, -33%/-58%), iNOS (-31%/-51%, -31%/-79%, -31%/-47%) and TGF-beta1 (-64%/-78%, -75%/-74%, -81%/-79%) were significantly lower than Group PC (P<0.05); (3) except for levels of TGF-beta1 protein, there was no significant difference among Group CH, CL and HC rats (P>0.05). It suggests that curcumin may play a similar role as hydrocortisone in preventing BLMPF.

J Ethnopharmacol 2007 Mar 13.



« Last Edit: 01/05/2007 16:08:45 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #9 on: 01/05/2007 16:31:18 »
Two reports to compare hypothetical effects of curcumin in FA:

Peripheral blood neutrophils are hyperresponsive to IL-8
and Gro-alpha in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

Glynn PC, Henney EM, Hall IP.
Division of Therapeutics, University Hospital of Nottingham, UK.

Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) is characterized by increased pulmonary recruitment of peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) by interleukin (IL)-8 and other chemotactic mediators. This study investigated whether, in CFA, the PBN motility response is primed by IL-8 and growth-related oncogene (Gro)-alpha, as demonstrated in other neutrophilic inflammatory diseases, and whether the motility response of PBNs to IL-8 and Gro-alpha can be abrogated using a selective antagonist for the neutrophil receptor for IL-8 and Gro-alpha, CXCR2. The percentage of PBNs to undergo shape change (%SC), spontaneously and in response to IL-8 and Gro-alpha, was measured in patients with CFA (n=10) and controls (n=10), and the effect of the CXCR2 antagonist SB272844 studied. Plasma levels of IL-8, and Gro-alpha were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The %SC of unstimulated PBNs and the potency of Gro-alpha and IL-8 to produce neutrophil polarization was greater in CFA than in controls; dose which produces 50% of maximal effect (EC50) of IL-8 was 3.6 +/- 0.7 nM for CFA versus 6.3 +/- 1.0 nM for controls; p<0.05. SB272844 inhibited Gro-alpha induced but not IL-8 induced neutrophil shape change (equilibrium constant (KD) 123 +/- 18 nM). Plasma concentrations of Gro-alpha were increased in patients with CFA. PBNs are spontaneously activated and undergo a greater motility response to IL-8 and Gro-alpha in CFA. Interleukin-8 and growth-related oncogene-alpha, circulating in substimulatory amounts in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, may prime the peripheral blood neutrophils motility response, thus increasing their capacity for migration to the lung. Selective CXCR2 antagonists may be useful to block the Gro-alpha-induced priming response whilst preserving neutrophil functions mediated by CXCR1, the alternative neutrophil receptor for interleukin-8.

Eur Respir J. 2001 Sep;18(3):522-9.



"Spicing up" of the immune system by curcumin.

Jagetia GC, Aggarwal BB.
Cytokine Research Laboratory, Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is an orange-yellow component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a spice often found in curry powder. Traditionally known for its an antiinflammatory effects, curcumin has been shown in the last two decades to be a potent immunomodulatory agent that can modulate the activation of T cells, B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells. Curcumin can also downregulate the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines including TNF, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, and chemokines, most likely through inactivation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Interestingly, however, curcumin at low doses can also enhance antibody responses. This suggests that curcumin's reported beneficial effects in arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and cancer might be due in part to its ability to modulate the immune system. Together, these findings warrant further consideration of curcumin as a therapy for immune disorders.

J Clin Immunol. 2007 Jan;27(1):19-35.



The major problem is HOW to have enough insoluble curcumin absorbed
to be able to see its 'miracles' going on...

Quote
...even nanotechnology experts are paying
attention to Curcuma longa!


Polymeric nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin (nanocurcumin):
a novel strategy for human cancer therapy.


Bisht S, Feldmann G, Soni S, Ravi R, Karikari C, Maitra A, Maitra A.
ABSTRACT:
BACKGROUND: Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has potent anti-cancer properties as demonstrated in a plethora of human cancer cell line and animal carcinogenesis models. Nevertheless, widespread clinical application of this relatively efficacious agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to poor aqueous solubility, and consequently, minimal systemic bioavailability. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery approaches have the potential for rendering hydrophobic agents like curcumin dispersible in aqueous media, thus circumventing the pitfalls of poor solubility.
RESULTS: We have synthesized polymeric nanoparticle encapsulated formulation of curcumin - nanocurcumin - utilizing the micellar aggregates of cross-linked and random copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM), with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (VP) and poly(ethyleneglycol)monoacrylate (PEG-A). Physico-chemical characterization of the polymeric nanoparticles by dynamic laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirms a narrow size distribution in the 50nm range. Nanocurcumin, unlike free curcumin, is readily dispersed in aqueous media. Nanocurcumin demonstrates comparable in vitro therapeutic efficacy to free curcumin against a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, as assessed by cell viability and clonogenicity assays in soft agar. Further, nanocurcumin's mechanisms of action on pancreatic cancer cells mirror that of free curcumin, including induction of cellular apoptosis, blockade of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation, and downregulation of steady state levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNFalpha).
CONCLUSIONS: Nanocurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this efficacious agent by enabling ready aqueous dispersion. Future studies utilizing nanocurcumin are warranted in pre-clinical in vivo models of cancer and other diseases that might benefit from the effects of curcumin.

J Nanobiotechnology. 2007 Apr 17;5(1):3 [Epub ahead of print]




We should actually get an update from Carolyn about oregano oil miracles.
(me sent message to Her Oreganess right now)
Cheers,

ikoregano  [^] 
« Last Edit: 01/05/2007 16:53:40 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #10 on: 01/05/2007 17:19:41 »
I did ask Carolyn offline for an update.. will ask if she'd post online.
Found out from my dad the diagnosis is 'cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis'. Don't know how extensive the lung damage is.. he's on 2 litres/minute oxygen and unable to walk much, certainly not without the oxygen.
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #11 on: 01/05/2007 18:14:37 »
Hi janetah,

Is your dad at home with you or in a clinic?
Can he cope with his treatment, side effects and so on?
Is he eating properly? (i.e.garlic, cod liver oil, curry..) joke ;D
Drinking enough water to smooth his cough?
Did he lose or gain weight in the last 2-3months?
What's his future according to his doctor?
« Last Edit: 01/05/2007 18:17:33 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #12 on: 01/05/2007 18:45:49 »
Hi iko,

He's at home
No apparent side effects from the medication
Is eating and sleeping OK. 
Water - he tends to drink tea and coffee
He weight is about the same as always, maybe a little less perhaps due to stress of being in hospital, getting the diagnosis etc

I've just read your cod liver oil posts and will suggest he starts taking some - it can do no harm!

janetah
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #13 on: 01/05/2007 20:41:40 »
Hi iko,

He's at home
No apparent side effects from the medication
Is eating and sleeping OK. 
Water - he tends to drink tea and coffee
He weight is about the same as always, maybe a little less perhaps due to stress of being in hospital, getting the diagnosis etc

I've just read your cod liver oil posts and will suggest he starts taking some - it can do no harm!

janetah



"It can do no harm" in moderate doses, of course. Historically tested. Quality controls available today. Apparently sunshine is even better...but it is raining!
I have my doubts about that, being the 'cod-maniac'. It works in the long run, when it helps, over 6 weeks, so you start giving it and practically forget about it: did you read the study about women asyluum-seekers in Switzerland?

If your dad did not get enough sunshine recently, it will be just good for him, better than useless supplements with vitamin D2 instead of the proper sunshine/coD3.
We need a bit of help from Carolyn right now...oregano news.
Take care

ikod
« Last Edit: 06/05/2007 08:55:25 by iko »
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #14 on: 01/05/2007 21:12:03 »
Hi iko,

I did read about the asylum seekers.. and also saw mention of possible benefit for Parkinson's disease, which another relative has, I will tell him.

What was the miracle cure involving your grandfather?

Will await news of oregan.

thanks again for your help today

janetah  :)
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #15 on: 01/05/2007 22:13:37 »
Hi iko,

I did read about the asylum seekers.. and also saw mention of possible benefit for Parkinson's disease, which another relative has, I will tell him.

What was the miracle cure involving your grandfather?
Will await news of oregan.

thanks again for your help today

janetah  :)




You clever Janetah,

I mentioned it, but I couldn't ever imagine anybody asking about it!

It's always been a mystery that my grandma and my mother told us over the years.
Back in the late '20s my grandfather was about 40 and got 'sick': weakness, no fever, no pain, just anorexia and weight loss.  He couldn't manage to work (fabric designer), so his family started having eating problems as well, and they always kept a clear memory of those days (before World War II). The whole family of four was going bankrupt in those crucial months.
Quite a stoic dude, he looked almost dead but kept saying: "Do not worry, I'm not gonna die!".
He went to doctors and spent days at the local hospital with no result. His family and friends were being prepared for the worst. There was no diagnosis, maybe a smouldering form of mumps (his kids had it before) but nobody had any better idea.  My mum says he was actually sort of 'terminal' as we say these days.
And here he comes, our hero, his older brother, a sort of genius who could not study engineering but became a medical doctor to make his mother happy (!!). He had spent just a few years in academic medicine, and pretty soon went back home to be a GP, a country doctor, beloved by his patients. A wise man during the day, he used to spend nights and holidays in his garage, fiddling with radios, fixing electrical devices, dismantling his car and putting it back together. Unfortunately he did not know what to do for his brother either, he had followed him from the very start of his ailment and guided his 'path' through professors and distinguished experts.
I don't know if it was his own idea or what: he decided to give 'cod' a try.
The legend tells that a special can of cod liver oil shipped from Norway appeared one day.
My grandpa could not even swallow at that point, so they had to start with little drops of that awful stinky oil.
Surprisingly enough, he made it, after weeks and months.
Back to work, with no money or savings of sort, ready to face starvation again because of the war this time, he managed to stay alive with his entire family, to enjoy his grandchildren and later on died peacefully at 80yrs in 1962.
My mother says he took 'cod' ever since.
That's the story of my mother's father and uncle, Achille & Virgilio (nice names!).
Thanks for asking, but I actually burned my dictionary!
Take care

ikod   [^]
 





All this happened in the surroundings of Biella, in Piedmont, little town in the North-West of Italy, leaning over the Alps.
Vital area for our thriving textile industry in the last century.
« Last Edit: 22/03/2009 11:00:50 by iko »
 

Offline Carolyn

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« Reply #16 on: 02/05/2007 01:30:58 »
Hi Jan - Nice to meet you, though I wish it were under better circumstances.  I just saw your email.  Sorry about what your Dad is going through.  I will check with my mom to find out the dosage and concentrations in the nose spray, but it will probably be tomorrow before I can get back to you with it. 
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #17 on: 02/05/2007 12:06:58 »
Hi Carolyn,

Thanks and give my regards to your mum!

janetah
 

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« Reply #18 on: 04/05/2007 10:05:42 »
Hello again iko,

Guess Carolyn's busy... in the meantime I've emailed the site she mentioned newbielink:http://www.oreganol.com [nonactive] to ask whether they think oregano oil could help with my dad's cough.

I told him about 'cod' and he's going to take it.  What dose do you think?  I told him your wonderful story about your grandfather, too and showed him the picture of his village. It's a little bit amazing how this fish swims his way through your family history!

A question about curcumin.  The April 2007 paper you sent says the delivery method is being investigated via nanotechnology and this probably won't be in time for my dad.  I'm wondering whether non-orthodox medicine has - sometime, somewhere - found a delivery method which works. I'm going to find some herbalists here to ask about this. Do you have any thoughts...?

janetah

 
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #19 on: 04/05/2007 21:24:01 »
Hello again iko,

Guess Carolyn's busy... in the meantime I've emailed the site she mentioned www.oreganol.com to ask whether they think oregano oil could help with my dad's cough.

I told him about 'cod' and he's going to take it.  What dose do you think?  I told him your wonderful story about your grandfather, too and showed him the picture of his village. It's a little bit amazing how this fish swims his way through your family history!

A question about curcumin.  The April 2007 paper you sent says the delivery method is being investigated via nanotechnology and this probably won't be in time for my dad.  I'm wondering whether non-orthodox medicine has - sometime, somewhere - found a delivery method which works. I'm going to find some herbalists here to ask about this. Do you have any thoughts...?

janetah

 

Hi janetah,

of course we have to wait for details from Her Oreganess!
Your father is being properly cured and we do not want to worsen his condition, do we?
Oregano oil is probably a very efficient anti-fungi agent, but could also give heavy allergic reactions, being so concentrated and powerful. Caution should be the rule.

Curcumin caps are already on the market, as plenty of other natural products.
Quality controls and extensive tests are not as mandatory as they are for drugs; so you have to trust the producer.  Side effects are usually minimized because it's 'natural' stuff, and this is not correct.
Fortunately curcumin (the real one) has been tested and proven tolerated at very high doses.
Unfortunately positive 'evidences' regarding FA are lacking.  Reports about FA from systemic sclerosis are a sort of 'indirect' suggestions. A particular anti-inflammatory action, working in the long run, is still a matter of study.

We are not experimenting on your father's FA: we are going for a big, big, enormous placebo effect, if you think about it. You are dedicating your web searches to his problem, frantically surfing in your spare time; you just found this forum and probably many other sites, got the cod liver oil story from Italy and told him everything...I'm sure he is already feeling a bit better.
Imagine how he will do after the first dose of 'cod'!
Fingers crossed.  You are the nicest daughter.

wisekod    [^]

P.S.
Original recipe for home made anti-cough
from a quite othodox USA textbook (1976)
H.C.Shirkey Ed. - Pediatric therapy 4th ed.
C.V.Mosby Company, italian ed.(Piccin)p.359:
1 spoon of lemon juice, 1 honey, 1 whisky(!)
in a cup of hot water plus 2 spoons of sugar;
Onion juice and/or orange juice may be added.
Caution: infants 2-4 teaspoons per day ONLY.
I actually never tested on myself, lucky of me
I'm never ill...I could adopt this modified one:
1 drop lemon, 1 drop honey in a bottle of w.!!!

funkod  ;D
« Last Edit: 07/05/2007 22:51:21 by iko »
 

Offline Carolyn

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« Reply #20 on: 04/05/2007 23:51:25 »
Hi Iko and Jan - Sorry it's taken so long.  I haven't forgotten.  I've asked my mom to write down all the pertinent details and email to me, but I havent' heard from her yet.  I'm about to go out, but I'll give her a call when I get back and try to get you an answer.
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #21 on: 05/05/2007 13:04:12 »
You're right, uncle iko  ;) it's possible to go a bit crazy and clutch at all kinds of straws... i'll calm down.

Thanks, Carolyn - I havent't heard from the oregano people yet and any info your mum can give would be most welcome.

janetah
 

Offline Carolyn

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« Reply #22 on: 18/05/2007 04:20:43 »
Hi Janetah & Iko - So sorry it's taken me so long.  Here is the dosage and instructions.  For nose spray:  Put 5-10 drops in a 1 oz. bottle of nasal spray and use as needed.  I would recommend starting out with 5 drops and add to it as he becomes acclimated with it.  It is an unpleasant taste and may burn a little bit at first, but you do get used it.  I use 8 drops in mine and my mom uses 10 in hers.  I would recommend using the spray with a pump so that its less likely to suck back in any germs in the bottle.

For the nebulizer.  Use ONLY distilled water or boiled water that has cooled down.  Add 5ml or 1 teaspoon water.  Start with 2-3 drops of oregano oil .  Again, as he becomes more comfortable with the oil, you can increase the dosage up to 4-5 drops.  Mom uses 5 drops in hers. Mom uses 5 drops in hers and used the nebulizer several times a day.

There is no exact dosage.  Do what is comfortable for you.  Also, let me say she still sometimes has to use that nebulizer, especially in the summer.  She is not 100% cured, but the difference really is night and day.  She is no longer using oxygen and is able to go and work in the garden for hours at a time with out struggling to breathe.

REMEMBER - ONLY USE WATER SOLUABLE OREGANO OIL!

Janetah - I hope & pray this helps your dad.  Please keep me informed.
 

Offline janetah

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« Reply #23 on: 23/05/2007 16:25:24 »
Hi Carolyn,

Thank you and thank your mum, too! I'll pass this info to my father. BTW, he's doing much better now his chest infection is clearing, walking more and not using the oxygen quite so much.

janetah  :)
 

Offline iko

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« Reply #24 on: 23/05/2007 18:31:05 »
Yabadabadoooo!

Thanks for the good news Janetah from Surrey UK!
Drugs are making their job in the end...it takes time.
No news good news, but I was starting to worry a bit.
Be careful with 'natural' stuff anyway: oregano oil
gives heavy hypersensitivity reactions (allergy) in
certain patients.
Take care

uncle ikod  ;)
 

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Fibrosing Alveolitis
« Reply #24 on: 23/05/2007 18:31:05 »

 

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