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Author Topic: killing bacteria in the kitchen.  (Read 14211 times)

paul.fr

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« on: 01/05/2007 22:42:21 »
i am thinking that a short sharp sock of electricity can kill bacteria, if this is so. could i rub some balloons on my kitchen work surfaces, making them charged, to zap them with static electricity?


 

Offline neilep

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #1 on: 01/05/2007 22:58:04 »
LOL...how would ewe know if ewe were successful ?

I suppose ewe could borrow an electron microscope and check for signs of life !
 

paul.fr

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #2 on: 01/05/2007 23:00:43 »
LOL...how would ewe know if ewe were successful ?

I suppose ewe could borrow an electron microscope and check for signs of life !

good counter question. but if it did work a few balloons would be cheaper than buying flash or whatever and those anti-bacterial handwashes, etc.
 

another_someone

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #3 on: 01/05/2007 23:51:26 »
The problem is that the balloons might create a significant voltage, but cannot create any significant current.  What usually is likely to damage a cell in having electricity pass through it is by being heated by the electricity, and that heat derives from the current not the voltage.

If you did create sufficient current to heat the bacteria to the point of killing them, you run significant risks of damaging the work surface, and very likely will cause you harm if you handle the equipment.
« Last Edit: 01/05/2007 23:52:57 by another_someone »
 

Offline BenV

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #4 on: 02/05/2007 10:40:40 »
We've got a microbiology programme coming up in a couple of weeks, I will ask Bacteriologist Gillian Fraser for her opinion. Listen out and you will hopefully get an answer in the May 13th live show (May 15th podcast)
 

paul.fr

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #5 on: 02/05/2007 13:17:10 »
We've got a microbiology programme coming up in a couple of weeks, I will ask Bacteriologist Gillian Fraser for her opinion. Listen out and you will hopefully get an answer in the May 13th live show (May 15th podcast)

Many thanks, Ben.
 

Offline BenV

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #6 on: 04/05/2007 13:19:21 »
In fact, in light of our upcoming programme we've got a poll running  Here
See if you can guess which plate was taken from swabs of a kitchen, and which from swabs of a toilet seat.
 

Offline esecallum

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #7 on: 06/05/2007 12:38:19 »
i am thinking that a short sharp sock of electricity can kill bacteria, if this is so. could i rub some balloons on my kitchen work surfaces, making them charged, to zap them with static electricity?

I USED AN $80 OZONE ENALY GENERATOR bought from www.enaly.com [nofollow] TO KILL ANTS IN THE KITCHEN which had invaded from the garden..

no matter how many i killed more seemed to pop out from crevices.

ozone also kills bacteria...and virii...and moulds..

you leave it on for about 20 to 60 minutes  depending on size of room...

you leave the room and dont re-enter until 30 minutes after generator has stopped as ozone bad for lungs.

the ants were all killed.no more ants to annoy me.

i also drink ozonated water.


i also saved a mans limb and possibly life by using ozone bagging.

thelimb had been infected by mrsa and doctors after trying various antibiotics gave him the option of amputation or slow and painful death.

i washed the infected limb in warm water and gently scrubbed it to remove dead surface skin flakes.then i enclosed the wet warm leg  in a plastic bag and sealed it upto the thigh with ordinary glue and elastic bands. then thru a small sealed incision in the bag ozone gas was pumped for 4 hours.

the bag inflated and the moisture and warmth caused by the plastic bag from perspiration allowed transdermal ozone to penetrate the skin and kill the infection in the limb...

3 further treatments to make sure no residual infection remained over 3 days...


the man can walk is alive and no amputation of his leg as prescribed by his ignorant doctors.


ozone bagging of infected limbs with mrsa infections etc,etc...can be treated...many limbs have been saved by individuals...

most doctors are ignorant and choose not to want to know..
« Last Edit: 06/05/2007 13:13:41 by esecallum »
 

Offline BenV

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #8 on: 06/05/2007 13:38:38 »
Actually Esecallum, I highly recommend you listen to tonight's Naked Scientists Show (due to be podcasted on Tuesday), as we have a guest on talking about a non-pharmaceutical treatment for MRSA infections.  It might be your sort of thing.
 

Offline JimBob

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #9 on: 06/05/2007 20:50:33 »
YET, There is also the unwanted effect of Ozone killing lung cells. It is why the weather guys for the government predict bad ozone days - so people with bad lungs don't get out in it or take precautions for their own health (inhaler, etc.) if they go outside.
 

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killing bacteria in the kitchen.
« Reply #9 on: 06/05/2007 20:50:33 »

 

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