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Author Topic: Molecular biology question.  (Read 5813 times)

Offline MayoFlyFarmer

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Molecular biology question.
« on: 23/03/2004 03:15:37 »
ok, this is something I really SHOULD know, but it keeps coming up at work, and I don't want to ask and sound dumb, and I never get around to looking it up when I go home, so i'll ask ya'll.  Is there a difference between "transforming cells" and "transfecting cells"?  if so what is the difference?  or is it just two names for the same technique?
Your wisdom is appreciated.

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Offline MayoFlyFarmer

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Re: Molecular biology question.
« Reply #1 on: 25/03/2004 18:27:31 »
haha, thanks for the help, even though I got all excited for nothing!!  maybe others will notcie it now.  I do know that they are both procedures YOU do to the cell, but that was good logic.  I do have somewhat of a guess as to what the difference may be, and I'll post it here in case it aids anyone in answering my question.  
My "hypothisis" is that you transform a bacterial cell (i.e. E. coli)  while you transfect a cell culture cell (i.e. Human cancer culutres).  Or maybe it is just two words for the same thing?  Any thoughts anyone??

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Offline NakedScientist

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Re: Molecular biology question.
« Reply #2 on: 26/03/2004 05:31:20 »
Transfection is the process by which a piece of DNA is conveyed into a cell with the aim of expressing genes from the piece of genetic material. It is possible to transfect eukaryotic cells with plasmids (in circular or linearised forms), and even genomic (high molecular weight) DNA from, for instance, viruses.

Transformation is variably used to describe cells which have undergone malignant "transformation", in other words become cancerous, and the word is also used in relation to bacteria that have taken up a plasmid which alters their behaviour. For instance, when you are carrying out a molecular cloning experiment you would transform a plasmid bearing the gene you want to clone, together with an antibiotic resistance gene, into a bacterium and then grow it on a plate containing that antibiotic. That way the bacteria which take up the plasmid (so called transformants) and the only ones which will grow (as they have antibiotic resistance).

TNS
 

Offline MayoFlyFarmer

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Re: Molecular biology question.
« Reply #3 on: 26/03/2004 14:34:08 »
why would you do that.
thnaks naked, thats exactly what I had thought, but I didn't want to be wrong and look dumb

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The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Molecular biology question.
« Reply #3 on: 26/03/2004 14:34:08 »

 

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