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Author Topic: Where in the world?  (Read 231950 times)

Offline Bass

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« Reply #100 on: 11/10/2007 16:57:55 »
I visited this crater back in the early 80's, but I had to pull out my old slides to be sure it was the same place.  I recall seeing lots of wildlife, including predators.  At that time, it had just recently been named as a World Heritage Site by the UN- mostly due to it's unique animal population.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #101 on: 11/10/2007 17:07:06 »
It became a conservation area in 1959 and a Heritage site in 1979.

I've been there a few times and cresting the rim always takes my breath away (although that may be due to the altitude & my chest problems  :D )

There is more wildlife there per km2 than anywhere else on the continent. However, there is 1 spectacular animal that is noticably absent. Any ideas which & why?
« Last Edit: 11/10/2007 17:09:44 by DoctorBeaver »
 

Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #102 on: 11/10/2007 17:31:05 »
hmmmmmm it's not beavers that's for sure  ;D

Sorry, just coulnd't resists to post as I need to address a few things. No worries though you'll definitely  see me (not) lurking here a lot more than posting. You people know wayyyyyy too much - so every once and so often I'll pester you with some n00b questions - just so that you won't get too smug  ;) ;D


Sir Jim Bob
I'm deeply sorry I gave you such a run about. .... and all for nothing in the end
I meant to make it easy, after all, Swiss mountains, apart from the Matterhorn which is easily recognizable on branded Swiss chocolate, are not very well known.

You see
my reasons for not attaching the picture was due to consideration of bandwidth bills that the generous owners / operators of this faaaabulous MB have to meet

and I know that can hurt

I was too lazy at that point to reupload/rename the piccie to photobucket
I shall mend my ways I promise

**** hangs head in shame ******


....

and now back to your regular scheduled program  ;D


this time with IMG tags ~ no nasty bandwidth bills


Fire mountain you say...... sounds very hawaii-ish

but I'm sure it's not THAT simple  :-\ goes and sits on a comfy fence......

****eagerly awaits outcome *******
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #103 on: 11/10/2007 18:04:52 »
Not "Fire mountain. "Home (or Land) of the Fire God".
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #104 on: 11/10/2007 18:41:28 »
Ngorogoro or some un-spellable African click-language name. I remember see a special about the inbreeding of the lions in this crater.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #105 on: 11/10/2007 18:51:48 »
Ngorongoro (Tanzania) it is! Well done, JimBob.

The lions are especially badly hit by the reduced gene pool. They have become lethargic & a bit loopy. Other lions have been brought in from outside to try to bolster the gene pool.

1 animal that is conspicuous by its absence is the giraffe. They can't make the ascent from the outside; yet, strangely enough, there are rhinos in Ngorongoro.

Ngorongoro is Maa (the Maasai language) for "big hole". I hate to disappoint you, JimBob, but Maa isn't a click language. Indeed, it's not a Bantu language at all. It is, in fact, Nilotic. The Maasai (along with the Samburu, Turkana & some other lesser-known Kenyan tribes, plus the Ugandan Karamoja) migrated south from Sudan and largely displaced the indigenous Bantu tribes from northern & central Kenya.

Tha Maasai split into 2 factions - farmers & pastoralists. These 2 factions hated each other for various reasons and there was a massacre at Olduvai Gorge which resulted in many Maa migrating further south into southern Kenya & northern Tanzania. But this is not the place for a history of East African tribes.
« Last Edit: 11/10/2007 19:00:05 by DoctorBeaver »
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #106 on: 12/10/2007 04:38:59 »

Ngorongoro is Maa (the Maasai language) for "big hole". I hate to disappoint you, JimBob, but Maa isn't a click language. Indeed, it's not a Bantu language at all. It is, in fact, Nilotic. The Maasai (along with the Samburu, Turkana & some other lesser-known Kenyan tribes, plus the Ugandan Karamoja) migrated south from Sudan and largely displaced the indigenous Bantu tribes from northern & central Kenya.

Tha Maasai split into 2 factions - farmers & pastoralists. These 2 factions hated each other for various reasons and there was a massacre at Olduvai Gorge which resulted in many Maa migrating further south into southern Kenya & northern Tanzania. But this is not the place for a history of East African tribes.

No it isn't but where the heck would you put it? It is very interesting and I have been enlightened by the facts.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #107 on: 12/10/2007 07:40:25 »
Much of it is pretty vague as the stories have been passed down orally. There are no written records.
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #108 on: 12/11/2007 18:37:11 »
Interesting geologic story



(will cite internet source of photo later)
« Last Edit: 12/11/2007 18:41:34 by Bass »
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #109 on: 12/11/2007 20:44:59 »
Hint:

If you eat one of these rock piles you will feel hungry again in a few hours. Not the "stick to your ribs" type of rock pile.
 

Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #110 on: 12/11/2007 21:49:36 »

No idea about eating rock piles (except for the chocolate hills but those don't look like your pic)...

My guess
Mountains along the Yangtze River (in Pinyin, Chang Jiang)~ China
Much of that landscape has changed though since the dam....
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #111 on: 12/11/2007 23:54:35 »
China it is!  These "rock piles" are just outside the city of Guilin.

Now the $0.64 question- How did they form?
 

Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #112 on: 16/11/2007 14:00:21 »
It wouldn't by any chance be *this*:


Geologists recently discovered four splendid natural bridges on a 1-km path—a world geological wonder—in Xing’an County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region,according to a 2001 issue of Beijing Review.

The bridges in Guilin range in height from 40 to 100 meters, and are 30-60 meters wide. Splendid, peculiar, dangerous, enchanting and elegant, they are formed by natural karst caves linked to each other. Experts from the Karst Geology Research Institute under the Chinese Academy of Geology noted that the type of natural bridges in Baishi are rarely seen elsewhere in China.


If I'm right (and the $ 0.64 are MINE  ;D) there is still lots to fill in on the HOW and WHEN (probably not the WHY)
I hope you'll delight us, Bass, before the weekend is out  :)
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #113 on: 16/11/2007 14:11:53 »

Interesting geologic story



(will cite internet source of photo later)
thats in china.. I think it is a carbonate rock like lime stone and two or three other components.. It has been too long and I cant remember the other stuff but limestone stands out in my head... was'nt.. It seemed like karsist or Carsh  I can't remember how it was spelled... but it was something like that.. the rocks were really cool! I think it was once part of a big mountain.. but I can't remember the details..

Supposed to be kind of a subtropical place.. with temperatures that fluctuate if I recall.

Thats is a beautiful picture bass!
« Last Edit: 16/11/2007 14:34:34 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #114 on: 18/11/2007 10:11:14 »
OK Where is this??

 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #115 on: 19/11/2007 20:16:24 »
Based on the rocks visible in the background (look volcanic), the trees (alpine spruce and fir), and the dry open areas- my guess would be somewhere in the Cascade Mountains- the roped off parking lot suggests some sort of park or monument.  Crater Lake, perhaps?
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #116 on: 19/11/2007 20:19:13 »
LOL LOL I think you are right .. LOL Periodically I will throw one in but they will all be crater lake because that is the only place I went of any value! LOL! Good Job! LOL!
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #117 on: 19/11/2007 20:43:24 »
It wouldn't by any chance be *this*:


Geologists recently discovered four splendid natural bridges on a 1-km path—a world geological wonder—in Xing’an County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region,according to a 2001 issue of Beijing Review.

The bridges in Guilin range in height from 40 to 100 meters, and are 30-60 meters wide. Splendid, peculiar, dangerous, enchanting and elegant, they are formed by natural karst caves linked to each other. Experts from the Karst Geology Research Institute under the Chinese Academy of Geology noted that the type of natural bridges in Baishi are rarely seen elsewhere in China.


If I'm right (and the $ 0.64 are MINE  ;D) there is still lots to fill in on the HOW and WHEN (probably not the WHY)
I hope you'll delight us, Bass, before the weekend is out  :)


Quote from: Karen W
thats in china.. I think it is a carbonate rock like lime stone and two or three other components.. It has been too long and I cant remember the other stuff but limestone stands out in my head... was'nt.. It seemed like karsist or Carsh  I can't remember how it was spelled... but it was something like that.. the rocks were really cool! I think it was once part of a big mountain.. but I can't remember the details..

Karst it is! Karst topography is formed when limestone and dolomites are dissolved underground, forming extensive caverns, sinkholes and collapse structures.  The toothlike "peaks" are remnants of limestone that have not yet collapsed.  China's karst terrains require special geological conditions.  First, a considerable thickness of hard limestones (in this case, Devonian limestones- which means that they're a bit older than JimBob).  Second, dramatic recent uplift of the land- otherwise the area would be more flattened by erosion.  The uplift was provided by active plate tectonics.  Lastly, abundant warm rainfall, which this area gets during the monsoon season.  As rain forms, it interacts with CO2 and SO2 in the area, becoming slightly acidic.  Slightly acidic waters easily dissolve the carbonate minerals in limestone- creating caves and karst topography over tens of thousands of years.
The karst terrrain is known as fenglin "isolated peak forests" and fengcong "peak clusters".
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #118 on: 19/11/2007 20:50:18 »
Thats the right spelling! K A R S T!!! YAYYYYYYYY! Now if I can commit it and the rest of the info to memory I might remember it all next time!.. I seen pictures of this a couple years ago, lots more pictures it was very interesting looking formations and their making actually baffled me and still does! Thanks Bass!
 

Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #119 on: 19/11/2007 20:59:10 »
Karst it is - fantastic stuff! - Must add that to my places to go see before I die

Heheheh - you can transfer the $0.64 to my account in Switzerland!  ;) ;D


Now - how about *this* ?



Knowing me you've already got a pretty good geographical fix so I'm not going to give you any furter tips.....



 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #120 on: 19/11/2007 22:56:49 »
As Dorothy said "I've got a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore"

Not exactly the Swiss Alps either?

Saudi Arabia has numerous caves and sinkholes.  The only one I've visited is Dharb al Najem, much larger than the sinkhole in your picture.  Perhaps yours is in the Ma'aqala area?

Send your Swiss account number and password, and I'll post the $0.64 forthwith.   ::)
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #121 on: 20/11/2007 01:28:40 »

...... (in this case, Devonian limestones- which means that they're a bit older than JimBob). 


OK, you really do not want to get to the real me, do you Bass? I am a placoderm. Here is a picture of me taken by the daughter of AL Gore

(not!)

and an artist's rendering of my upcoming plastic surgery results.

  (not!)
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #122 on: 20/11/2007 03:33:16 »
Trembling, retreats into the corner...sucking thumb-
hopes not to anger the JimBob.
« Last Edit: 20/11/2007 03:42:01 by Bass »
 

Offline Alandriel

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« Reply #123 on: 21/11/2007 17:34:38 »
Oh oh - JimBob is extinct!

 ;D

Account # 12445566 at UBS Geneva will do Bass - thanyouverymuch

nah!

On second thought: get a lolly for the neighbor's kid and say HI from me
(hope you won't get arrested or something)
I *was* kidding of course you know with the $ 0.64


Saudi Arabia - real close; but not quite.  ;D

This one is in Oman - location with no name really, only a km sign off the road somewhere south of Musqat.
What is a sinkwhole really and how is it formed?


Dharb al Najem sounds interesting. You don't by any chance have a piccie (I must go google that one and find out more).
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #124 on: 21/11/2007 18:45:38 »
Most sinkholes, though certainly not all, are related to karst processes.  Limestone is dissolved by slightly acidic water- most rainwater is slightly acidic due to carbonic acid (reaction with CO2).  As the rainwater seeps into fractures, cracks, or along bedding planes of limestones it creates caverns, especially where the limestone is underlain or overlain by impermeable rocks like shales.  Eventually, some caverns get large enough that the roof starts to collapse.  Caverns that are at or slightly above the water table are more susecptible to roof collapse, especially during dry periods.  As the roof continues to collapse, it eventually makes its way to the surface, causing a sinkhole.
 

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« Reply #124 on: 21/11/2007 18:45:38 »

 

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