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Author Topic: How does magnetism affect the body, if at all?  (Read 81835 times)

Offline RD

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Re: Magnetic Therapy
« Reply #75 on: 26/01/2012 17:17:33 »
... the Placebo effect is well documented and very powerful

Only when the outcome is a subjective self-assessment, not where an objective measurement can be made ...
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We found little evidence in general that placebos had powerful clinical effects. Although placebos had no significant effects on objective or binary outcomes, they had possible small benefits in studies with continuous subjective outcomes and for the treatment of pain. Outside the setting of clinical trials, there is no justification for the use of placebos.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200105243442106
« Last Edit: 29/01/2012 12:02:52 by RD »
 

Offline imatfaal

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Re: Magnetic Therapy
« Reply #76 on: 27/01/2012 09:19:10 »
To back up RD's point; this is from the abstract of the Cochrane Review on Placebos

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Placebo interventions are often claimed to substantially improve many clinical conditions. However, most reports on effects of placebos are based on unreliable studies that have not randomised patients to placebo or no treatment.

We studied the effect of placebo treatments by reviewing 202 trials comparing placebo treatment with no treatment covering 60 healthcare problems. In general, placebo treatments produced no major health benefits, although on average they had a modest effect on outcomes reported by patients, such as pain. However, the effect on pain varied from large to non-existent, even in well-conducted trials. Variations in the effect of placebo was partly explained by variations in how trials were conducted, the type of placebo used, and whether patients were informed that the trial involved placebo.

You can read the whole report Placebo interventions for all clinical conditions
 

Offline Donnah

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Re: Magnetic Therapy
« Reply #77 on: 04/03/2012 22:46:51 »
I find the administration of placebos to be an exercise in condescension (as well-meaning as that may sometimes be).  People always have a reason for seeking medical help.  I believe most ailments have emotional origins such as a subconscious need for attention, or a feeling of anxiety or desperation stemming from a feeling of powerlessness.  People who feel disempowered will naturally go to someone they see as more powerful than themselves (authority figure) to seek answers.   But the fact that they have made an effort to find answers is a good sign.  At that point the most beneficial path is to teach people to empower themselves, which I'm happy to see is a growing skill in our world.   

More than anything, I think people need kindness (a form of caring/love).  The world can be a pretty rough place to live sometimes, and a kind word or touch or even just listening to someone spill their woes can make people feel better.  The tricky bit is discerning the line between helping and enabling.  Like the difference between a wheel spinning in place in a rut, or a wheel bumping up out of the rut and moving on down the road.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Magnetic Therapy
« Reply #77 on: 04/03/2012 22:46:51 »

 

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