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Author Topic: Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?  (Read 5245 times)

another_someone

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« on: 22/05/2007 14:19:36 »
I know that gravity can alter the path of an electromagnetic wave, but the underlying electromagnetic wave is a manifestation of an electrostatic field, so the question is whether gravity can distort an electrostatic field itself, or is it merely the wave property of an electromagnetic wave that is influenced by gravity?

In other words, although the force exerted by an electrostatic field is inversely proportional to the square of the distance you are from the source of that field, but is this only true in a context that is free of gravity, with the field itself being slightly distorted by the gravity, or is it true irrespective of the gravitational field it is within?


 

Offline tony6789

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #1 on: 22/05/2007 18:02:12 »
dont ask me any1 eles know?
 

Offline lightarrow

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #2 on: 23/05/2007 17:41:24 »
I know that gravity can alter the path of an electromagnetic wave, but the underlying electromagnetic wave is a manifestation of an electrostatic field, so the question is whether gravity can distort an electrostatic field itself, or is it merely the wave property of an electromagnetic wave that is influenced by gravity?

In other words, although the force exerted by an electrostatic field is inversely proportional to the square of the distance you are from the source of that field, but is this only true in a context that is free of gravity, with the field itself being slightly distorted by the gravity, or is it true irrespective of the gravitational field it is within?
What I know is the other way around: an electric field (as any other field) creates gravity and so bends space-time; so, in a region where an E field is present, a gravitational field is created as well and even a neutral body is affected by it.
 

another_someone

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #3 on: 23/05/2007 18:34:14 »
What I know is the other way around: an electric field (as any other field) creates gravity and so bends space-time; so, in a region where an E field is present, a gravitational field is created as well and even a neutral body is affected by it.

That is certainly interesting - does that imply that a naked ion has a greater gravitational field than a neutral atom, or is the effect not that great?

On the other hand, is it not reasonable that such an interaction would be mutual (if E creates gravity, then it is clearly not inert to gravity, and thus would at first instance seem to me to imply that it might also be effected by gravity to the extent that it effects gravity - or am I wrong?
 

Offline lightarrow

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #4 on: 24/05/2007 20:59:32 »
What I know is the other way around: an electric field (as any other field) creates gravity and so bends space-time; so, in a region where an E field is present, a gravitational field is created as well and even a neutral body is affected by it.
That is certainly interesting - does that imply that a naked ion has a greater gravitational field than a neutral atom, or is the effect not that great?
The effect is probably negligible.
Quote
On the other hand, is it not reasonable that such an interaction would be mutual (if E creates gravity, then it is clearly not inert to gravity, and thus would at first instance seem to me to imply that it might also be effected by gravity to the extent that it effects gravity - or am I wrong?
I'd say you are correct, but I have no precise idea.
 

another_someone

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #5 on: 25/05/2007 00:13:19 »
What I know is the other way around: an electric field (as any other field) creates gravity and so bends space-time; so, in a region where an E field is present, a gravitational field is created as well and even a neutral body is affected by it.
That is certainly interesting - does that imply that a naked ion has a greater gravitational field than a neutral atom, or is the effect not that great?
The effect is probably negligible.
Yes, but the difference in mass of an atom that is ionised and one that is not is also negligible - so I was wondering if the increase in mass affected by adding electrons to an atom is greater or less than the decrease in mass affected by removing the nett charge from the ion?

On the other hand, is it not reasonable that such an interaction would be mutual (if E creates gravity, then it is clearly not inert to gravity, and thus would at first instance seem to me to imply that it might also be effected by gravity to the extent that it effects gravity - or am I wrong?
I'd say you are correct, but I have no precise idea.

Here the underlying question was essentially if the coulomb force is influenced by gravity, even slightly, does that mean that electrostatic charges cannot escape from a black hole, just as electromagnetic waves are unable to escape from a black hole?
« Last Edit: 25/05/2007 00:15:46 by another_someone »
 

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Does gravity effect an electrostatic field?
« Reply #5 on: 25/05/2007 00:13:19 »

 

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