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Author Topic: How does the immune system remember?  (Read 9425 times)

paul.fr

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How does the immune system remember?
« on: 23/05/2007 09:47:41 »
How does the immune system remember things such as viruses, and where doea it store that memory?


 

Offline Jenguin

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How does the immune system remember?
« Reply #1 on: 23/05/2007 12:47:56 »
Oh, boy, is that a can of worms?!!!  I can recommend a great textbook...!
 

Offline Seany

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How does the immune system remember?
« Reply #2 on: 23/05/2007 22:47:06 »
Err.. I think it was the antibodies which remember the viruses etc.. I do not know where they store them.. Maybe in a brain of their own? ???
 

another_someone

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How does the immune system remember?
« Reply #3 on: 23/05/2007 23:17:34 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immune_system#Immunological_memory
Quote
When B cells and T cells are activated and begin to replicate, some of their offspring will become long-lived memory cells. Throughout the lifetime of an animal, these memory cells will remember each specific pathogen encountered and can mount a strong response if the pathogen is detected again. This is "adaptive" because it occurs during the lifetime of an individual as an adaptation to infection with that pathogen and prepares the immune system for future challenges. Immunological memory can either be in the form of passive short-term memory or active long-term memory.

Passive memory

Passive immunity is usually short-term, lasting between a few days and several months. Newborn infants have no prior exposure to microbes and are particularly vulnerable to infection. Several layers of passive protection are provided by the mother. During pregnancy, a particular type of antibody, called IgG, is transported from mother to baby directly across the placenta, so human babies have high levels of antibodies even at birth, with the same range of antigen specificities as their mother. Breast milk also contains antibodies that are transferred to the gut of the infant and protect against bacterial infections until the newborn can synthesize its own antibodies. This is passive immunity because the fetus does not actually make any memory cells or antibodies, it only borrows them. In medicine, protective passive immunity can also be transferred artificially from one individual to another via antibody-rich serum.
Quote

The time-course of an immune response begins with the initial pathogen encounter, (or initial vaccination) and leads to the formation and maintenance of active immunological memory.
Active memory and immunization

Long-term active memory is acquired following infection by activation of B and T cells. Active immunity can also be generated artificially, through vaccination. The principle behind vaccination (also called immunization) is to introduce an antigen from a pathogen in order to stimulate the immune system and develop specific immunity against that particular pathogen without causing disease associated with that organism. This deliberate induction of an immune response is successful because it exploits the natural specificity of the immune system, as well as its inducibility. With infectious disease remaining one of the leading causes of death in the human population, vaccination represents the most effective manipulation of the immune system mankind has developed.

Most viral vaccines are based on live attenuated viruses, while many bacterial vaccines are based on acellular components of micro-organisms, including harmless toxin components. Since many antigens derived from acellular vaccines do not strongly induce the adaptive response, most bacterial vaccines are provided with additional adjuvants that activate the antigen-presenting cells of the innate immune system and maximize immunogenicity.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

How does the immune system remember?
« Reply #3 on: 23/05/2007 23:17:34 »

 

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