The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: WHAT in the world is this?  (Read 5685 times)

Offline JimBob

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6564
  • Thanked: 7 times
  • Moderator
    • View Profile
WHAT in the world is this?
« on: 03/06/2007 02:31:56 »
http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e111/geezer69/Siberia.jpg


The link above it to an aerial photograph south of Novosibirsk, Siberia. The darker green is between 650 and 750 feet above sea level. The lighter area where there are fields are up to 1100 feet above seal level. This appears to be an area of huge drumlins. The yellow line is 150 miles long. These features are huge. If anyone has info on this, please post.





 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
WHAT in the world is this?
« Reply #1 on: 03/06/2007 17:43:26 »
Jim Bob, what are drumlins?
 

Offline Bass

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1340
  • Thanked: 5 times
    • View Profile
WHAT in the world is this?
« Reply #2 on: 03/06/2007 23:30:18 »
What happens when the band allows the drums to fraternize too closely ;)

They are elongate hills found in glacial terrain.  They are elongate in the direction of travel of the glacier and left behind when the glacier retreats.  Probably formed by rivers running in the bottom of the ice (intense pressure does weird things to ice) and the drumlin is the sediment left behind by the running water.  Most are in the range of a few hundred feet to less than a mile long- which is why a 150 mile long drumlin is so unusual.

Super drumlins would be my best guess also, JimBob- other nearby landforms indicate these features are parallel to the direction of travel of the ice.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

WHAT in the world is this?
« Reply #2 on: 03/06/2007 23:30:18 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums