The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?  (Read 3239 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?
« on: 12/06/2007 10:00:01 »
If the air is thinner, the pressure is reduced - yes? So if our internal pressure remains constant, are we more likely to pass wind?


 

Offline dentstudent

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3146
  • FOGger to the unsuspecting
    • View Profile
Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?
« Reply #1 on: 12/06/2007 11:17:22 »
If you have an upside-down glass jar with a balloon covering the open end to represent the non-pressure changing human body in the system, then put it in a vacuum chamber, i would expect the balloon to begin bulging away from the jar as the external vacuum increased. So, in principle, i would agree. Incidentaly, on hiking trips I've made to 3000m, there was a great deal more wind, but it might have been the previous nights beer!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?
« Reply #2 on: 12/06/2007 11:36:36 »
 [:0]
 

Offline Karen W.

  • Moderator
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *****
  • Posts: 31653
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • "come fly with me"
    • View Profile
Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?
« Reply #3 on: 14/06/2007 22:37:15 »
LOL LOL!
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Are we more likely to pass wind up a mountain?
« Reply #3 on: 14/06/2007 22:37:15 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums