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Author Topic: What is Whipple's disease?  (Read 53871 times)

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #25 on: 03/07/2007 00:31:07 »
Hummm  I see maybe a young boy, but No women?? Why do you suppose?

Hey,

I'm not going to report and copy ALL whipple cases in MedLine!
But if you check the previous abstracts, you'll find women too...
In autoimmune disorders women win 10 to one, approximately.
Immune systems -is suggested- are heavily controlled by sex hormones.
We should ask Chris about Whipple naughty beasts...
he doesn't seem interested, or he's just too busy right now.
May be he had a very bad Carnival in Venice!  ;D
Take care

ikod

I did not expect you to make copies silly! LOL..HEE HEE. I did not know I missed it in the previous posts so I will look back again.. Thank's Iko.

Hey you might be right I forgot Chris was going on that trip! I do hope he had lots of fun. It sounded lovely!

Do you mean ask him about the fastedious bugs you spoke of to me when you are talking about this? "We should ask Chris about Whipple naughty beasts...
he doesn't seem interested, or he's just too busy right now" Are those the same ones you refer to that can get into your heart??
« Last Edit: 03/07/2007 00:33:33 by Karen W. »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #26 on: 03/07/2007 00:55:57 »

Do you mean ask him about the fastedious bugs you spoke of to me when you are talking about this? "We should ask Chris about Whipple naughty beasts...
he doesn't seem interested, or he's just too busy right now" Are those the same ones you refer to that can get into your heart??

Me no catch this: too difficult 4me.
Say it in italian!

ikodfused  :(
« Last Edit: 03/07/2007 00:57:30 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #27 on: 03/07/2007 01:02:14 »

Do you mean ask him about the fastedious bugs you spoke of to me when you are talking about this? "We should ask Chris about Whipple naughty beasts...
he doesn't seem interested, or he's just too busy right now" Are those the same ones you refer to that can get into your heart??

Me no catch this: too difficult 4me.
Say it in italian!

ikodfused  :(

It's OK Iko I am confused to a lot lately.. don't pay any attention to that post as I can't figure it out either..! LOL!  Only slept for 3 hours felt like 3 minutes.... I have re read it and think I was thinking that the infectious bugs that can get into your heart heart might they be one and the same as in Whipples disease?? I think that is what I was asking.. LOL That still sounds wrong.. HEE HEE HEE.. Oh well!
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #28 on: 03/07/2007 01:18:19 »
When Tropheryma whippelii hits the central nervous system only,
this great masquerader becomes almost an 'invisible' pathogen:

Reversal of dementia associated with Whipple's disease
by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, drugs that penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

Ryser RJ, Locksley RM, Eng SC, Dobbins WO, Schoenknecht FD, Rubin CE.

A previously healthy 67-yr-old man presented with progressive dementia over an 11-mo period. Evaluation revealed evidence of malabsorption. Jejunal biopsy established the diagnosis of Whipple's disease. No other etiology for the patient's dementia was uncovered. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resulted in rapid elimination of Whipple's bacilli from the jejunum and complete reversal of the patient's dementia over a 6-mo period. Significant levels of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole were easily quantitated in the cerebrospinal fluid during therapy. There is increasing recognition of progressive neurologic disease in patients with Whipple's disease who were treated with tetracycline. The reversal of presumed central nervous system disease in this case suggests that drugs that penetrate the blood-brain barrier might be preferable for the initial treatment of Whipple's disease.

Gastroenterology. 1984 Apr;86(4):745-52.




« Last Edit: 21/07/2007 22:16:03 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #29 on: 03/07/2007 01:43:57 »
No Picture Iko...
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #30 on: 08/07/2007 12:19:59 »
Cerebral Whipple's disease as a cause of reversible dementia.

Rossi T, Haghighipour R, Haghighi M, Paolini S, Scarpino O.
Unità Operativa di Neurologia, Ospedale Geriatrico Sestilli, I.N.R.C.A., Ancona, Italy. t.rossi@inrca.it

We describe a case of reversible dementia caused by Tropheryma whippelii (TW). Diagnosis was confirmed by a positive polymerase chain reaction for this pathogen both on serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Specific antibiotic therapy resulted in distinct clinical and neuroradiological improvement. Control polymerase chain reaction for T. whippelii on serum and cerebrospinal fluid was negative.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2005 Apr;107(3):258-61.





« Last Edit: 08/07/2007 12:47:09 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #31 on: 08/07/2007 12:46:44 »
A prospective study of reversible dementias:
frequency, causes, clinical profile and results of treatment.

Srikanth S, Nagaraja AV.
Dementia Programme, Department of Neurology, Singapore General Hospital. drssrikanth@rediffmail.com

BACKGROUND: Dementia due to potentially reversible etiologies is an important group of dementias to be identified not only because of the number of such Patients encountered but also due to the potential for substantial improvement with treatment.
AIMS: To prospectively investigate the frequency and causes of dementias with potentially reversible etiologies; to examine the clinical features of this subgroup with a view to identifying a signature profile and to determine if this potential reversibility translates into actual reversibility with appropriate treatment. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal study of patients with dementia presenting to the outpatient services of a tertiary referral hospital. Methods: All Patients above 40 years referred for evaluation of cognitive complaints were serially enrolled and underwent clinical examination, various laboratory tests and neuroimaging. Patients were followed-up for one year.
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: One way analysis of variance for continuous variables followed by post hoc comparisons using Scheffe's procedure.
RESULTS: A total of 129 patients met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders edition 4 (DSM IV) criteria for dementia and qualified for inclusion into the study. Twenty-four patients (18%), all with moderately severe cognitive [mean mini mental state examination (MMSE) score +/- SD = 17.9 +/- 4.8] and neuropsychiatric [mean neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) score +/- SD = 30.7 +/- 8.7] dysfunction were diagnosed to have reversible causes - neuroinfections in 11 patients, normal pressure hydrocephalus in 8 patients and vitamin B12 deficiency in 5 patients. The majority of these patients had gait and urinary dysfunction reminiscent of subcortical dementias. These reversible causes were clinically suspected in only 58% of patients. In 20/24 patients in whom follow up was possible mean MMSE score had improved to 22.2 and mean NPI score had improved to 8.0, following 6 months of treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: Reversible causes, especially neuroinfections and vitamin B12 deficiency accounted for 18% all dementias in this study.
The majority of these conditions was not clinically suspected though resulting in moderate to severe cognitive and psychiatric dysfunction. Most of these patients had a subcortical pattern of dementia and showed substantial improvement with treatment.

Neurol India. 2005 Sep;53(3):291-4; discussion 294-6
.



« Last Edit: 22/07/2007 17:04:56 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #32 on: 21/07/2007 17:25:56 »
It looked like a lymphoma, but under the microscope
an infection was diagnosed: Whipple's disease!


Abdominal lymphomas, convulsive seizure and coma: a case of
successfully treated, advanced Whipple's disease with cerebral involvement.

Mohm J, Naumann R, Schuler U, Ehninger G.
Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I, Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus der Technischen Universität Dresden, Germany.

Whipple's disease is a rare, generalized inflammatory disorder due to the recently described bacterium Tropheryma whippelii. We report an unusual, successfully treated case of a 32-year-old woman, who presented with a 25 month history of large abdominal lymphomas, polyserositis and cachexia. The diagnosis of Whipple's disease was confirmed by duodenoscopy, lymph node and duodenal histology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of biopsy material and cerebrospinal fluid. A prolonged convulsive seizure with a subsequent 5 day period of coma were interpreted as signs of cerebral involvement. Under antibiotic treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) the patient recovered completely, CT scans showed a complete regression of abdominal lymphomas. The therapy was continued over 18 months without the occurrence of a relapse.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1998 Oct;10(10):893-5.






« Last Edit: 15/12/2007 08:25:58 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #33 on: 21/07/2007 22:40:07 »
One of many Whipple-websites is from Ohio Health:
everything is well explained and easy to find...


...even diagnostic difficulties are smartly described:

Quote
Screening and diagnosis

Whipple's disease is rare and many doctors may be unfamiliar with the disorder, so it's often diagnosed in its late stages. However, the earlier the diagnosis, the better because of the serious health risks associated with nontreatment
.




http://www.connecticutlifescience.com/biohistory_images/whipple.jpg



George Hoyt Whipple, a graduate of Yale University (A.B. 1900), was awarded the 1934 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with George R. Minot and William P. Murphy for their discoveries concerning liver therapy in cases of anaemia. (Photo: © The Nobel Foundation)

« Last Edit: 29/06/2008 17:28:21 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #34 on: 22/07/2007 14:58:08 »


For a neglected issue like this
1000 viewers
is a good reason to celebrate...

ikod  [^]
« Last Edit: 25/07/2007 14:18:51 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #35 on: 25/07/2007 14:25:18 »

Do you mean ask him about the fastedious bugs you spoke of to me when you are talking about this? "We should ask Chris about Whipple naughty beasts...
he doesn't seem interested, or he's just too busy right now" Are those the same ones you refer to that can get into your heart??

Me no catch this: too difficult 4me.
Say it in italian!

ikodfused  :(

It's OK Iko I am confused to a lot lately.. don't pay any attention to that post as I can't figure it out either..! LOL!  Only slept for 3 hours felt like 3 minutes.... I have re read it and think I was thinking that the infectious bugs that can get into your heart heart might they be one and the same as in Whipples disease?? I think that is what I was asking.. LOL That still sounds wrong.. HEE HEE HEE.. Oh well!


Hi Karen!

I took an extra boost of vitamin hyper megadoses and finally got your point!
Yes, Whipple bacteria can affect the heart and its valves, giving subacute endocarditis, strokes and things...but very rarely -because it is a very rare disease- and in the same fashion as many other much more common germs.
Some studies suggest that Whipple bacteria cause less inflammation than the other germs in most of the cases, but this is not clear (like all the rest).

ikod
« Last Edit: 25/07/2007 15:07:24 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #36 on: 25/07/2007 15:00:29 »

Whipple's endocarditis: review of the literature
and comparisons with Q fever, Bartonella infection, and blood culture-positive endocarditis.

Fenollar F, Lepidi H, Raoult D.
Unité des Rickettsies, Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 6020, Marseille, France.

Whipple's disease is a systemic infection sometimes associated with cardiac manifestations. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of reported cases of Whipple's endocarditis. The purpose of our study was to describe this entity. Data from 35 well-described cases of Whipple's endocarditis were collected and compared with those of blood culture-positive endocarditis, Q fever endocarditis, and Bartonella endocarditis. Some patients with generalized Whipple's disease presented with cardiac involvement, among other symptoms. Others presented with a nonspecific, blood culture-negative endocarditis with no associated symptoms. In comparison with cases of endocarditis due to other causes, congestive heart failure, fever, and previous valvular disease were less frequently observed in the cases of Whipple's endocarditis. Without examination of the excised valves, the diagnosis of infective endocarditis could not have been confirmed in most cases. Treatment is not well established. Whipple's endocarditis is a specific entity involving minor inflammatory reactions and negative blood cultures, and its incidence is probably underestimated.

Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Oct 15;33(8):1309-16.









Whipple's disease: a difficult diagnosis?

Peters FP, Elbrecht EA, Wouters RS, Engels LG, Stockbrügger RW.
Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Maastricht, Netherlands.

We present 3 patients with Whipple's disease all characterized by a longstanding prodromal period with progressive weight loss, diarrhoea, lymphadenitis and arthralgia or arthritis. Sarcoid-like Whipple's disease was diagnosed in one patient. He was treated with antibiotics. Initially his condition improved; however, a cerebral relapse developed which was treated successfully by ceftriaxone and cefixime. Extraintestinal Whipple's disease (lymph node localisation) was diagnosed in another patient treated successfully with antibiotics. A third case of Whipple's disease was unexpectedly diagnosed by laparotomy and partial small bowel resection. He was not treated till 2 years later with tetracycline. After 1 year of treatment his condition had improved.

Neth J Med. 1996 Sep;49(3):106-11.


« Last Edit: 14/08/2007 10:34:15 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #37 on: 25/07/2007 23:49:04 »
That is very interesting Iko!I LOVE THESE PICTURES!!!!
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #38 on: 15/08/2007 21:33:29 »
Wrong diagnosis for 16yrs,
then diarrhea started, so
Whipple was suspected and
...FOUND RIGHT THERE!!!
(17yrs ago)


Whipple's disease with axial and peripheral joint destruction.

Scheib JS, Quinet RJ.
Department of Internal Medicine, Ochsner Clinic, New Orleans, La.

A seropositive white man had follow-up for 16 years with a diagnosis of palindromic rheumatism. Treatment had included parenteral gold, methotrexate, prednisone, hydroxychloroquine sulfate, and penicillamine before diarrhea led to a biopsy-proven diagnosis of Whipple's disease.
Clinical and radiographic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis were met. In addition to classic Whipple's arthropathy, he had the combined but singular findings of pancarpal destruction and cervical apophyseal fusion. HLA typing revealed the B7 antigen. This case illustrates the pitfalls in diagnosis of a chronic polyarthritis that has, as a typical feature, a long latency before manifesting its more specific signs and symptoms (ie, diarrhea, malabsorption, and hyperpigmentation). Care should be taken during evaluation of any disease with atypical and nonspecific features (eg, positive rheumatoid factor in a patient with polyarthritis) and one should continue to reevaluate the original impression while confirmatory evidence is lacking. Moreover, the roentgenographic findings of pancarpal narrowing, apophyseal fusion, and advanced iliofemoral joint disease, in addition to sacroiliitis and syndesmophyte formation, challenge the generally held notion that Whipple's arthropathy is a nondestructive joint disease.

South Med J. 1990 Jun;83(6):684-7.




« Last Edit: 15/08/2007 22:37:00 by iko »
 

Offline understudy

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #39 on: 21/08/2007 09:12:07 »
iko,

First, let me say thank you to you for your insight and thoughts on Tropheryma whipplei bacteria.

A good friend of mine has recently begun treatment consistent with that for Whipple's disease.

After reading a bit on this bacteria and the Whipple's disease, I have come to believe that it is considered to be rare only because it is so difficult to observe.

Also, I am curious about a few potential issues relating to this bacteria:

- Is this bacteria is able to be passed from one person to another by becoming airborne?

- Has any researcher actually ever seen this bacteria alive, since an electron microscope does not allow for live viewing?

- If not, how does this restrict the effort of researchers to understand the nature of this bacteria?

-  Could many, many diseases that are presently known to the medical community be simply manifestations of different stages of this bacteria's existence within its human host and be incorrectly viewed as stand alone diseases?

- Are some or all of the bacteria in the family of this bacteria being underestimated in terms of their ability to work together?

- Can evolutionary change to any of the (six?) bacteria in this family  allow a systematic evolution from one to another to another ... and ultimately to the T whipelii?

- Is it possible that this bacteria plays a very substantial role in cancer diseases?

- Do you think that routine efforts to check for this bacteria and further understand the likelihood of its role in medical conditions listed on the following website as soon as a few of these symptoms are recognized ( newbielink:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/whipples-disease/DS00757/DSECTION=2 [nonactive]) would help to substantially increase advanced detection of this bacteria, prevent more advanced illnesses and deaths, and thus save the medical industry money?

-  Do you believe that until this bacteria is dressed up in threads of economics and globally paraded before the medical insurance industry as a profit thief that that industry will continue to underestimate it or overlook it?

Thank you again for your insight and for your devotion to this subject.

I look forward to seeing what your responses to these questions are.
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #40 on: 21/08/2007 19:03:57 »

Dear understudy,

thank you so much for joining us
in this whipply discussion.
I'll reply your multiple questions asap!
For now I suggest not to focus on one single germ
causing many diseases, but on MANY different 'fastidious'
germs causing troubles in few predisposed individuals: this is the
mainframe of this whipple experiment here.
I'm not an expert: sometimes it helps!  ;D
Cheers,

ikod

« Last Edit: 22/08/2007 23:09:29 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #41 on: 22/08/2007 22:05:55 »
OK understudy,

I'll reply your multiple questions as
a no-expert, just your discussant and
a simple 'reader' of intriguing cases
regarding obnoxious fastidious germs.

iko,
First, let me say thank you to you for your insight and thoughts on Tropheryma whipplei bacteria.
A good friend of mine has recently begun treatment consistent with that for Whipple's disease.

After reading a bit on this bacteria and the Whipple's disease, I have come to believe that it is considered to be rare only because it is so difficult to observe.

I think Tropheryma whipplei may be a common germ in our environment, nevertheless it causes troubles in very few people. Even considering a consistent number of undiagnosed cases, it should be a rare pathogen anyway.
I overstressed on purpose intriguing reports from medical literature to open the discussion on how to find a cheap and easy way to avoid these treatable ailments go undetected for months and years, with all the human suffering involved.



Also, I am curious about a few potential issues relating to this bacteria:
- Is this bacteria is able to be passed from one person to another by becoming airborne?

I think it survives happily in the environment (Actinomycetae) with its triple layer membrane, consequently air, dust, water and contacts may be the routes of infection.
As in many other cases, infection is routinely kept under control efficiently by the defence systems: only in rare instances -probably because of some immune defect- whipple bacteria manage to spread around.
See the previously cited reviews for details.


- Has any researcher actually ever seen this bacteria alive, since an electron microscope does not allow for live viewing?

Interesting point: Whipple bacteria had been successfully cultured at the end of the last century.  They are intracellular germs...I think it's quite difficult to see them alive.

- If not, how does this restrict the effort of researchers to understand the nature of this bacteria?

-  Could many, many diseases that are presently known to the medical community be simply manifestations of different stages of this bacteria's existence within its human host and be incorrectly viewed as stand alone diseases?

Good point, and the actual target of this thread, but never forget that this could be just one of several germs playing dirty tricks and hiding behind some 'idiopathic' human diseases.
I decided to start with this peculiar one knowing that it's not alone.


- Are some or all of the bacteria in the family of this bacteria being underestimated in terms of their ability to work together?

- Can evolutionary change to any of the (six?) bacteria in this family  allow a systematic evolution from one to another to another ... and ultimately to the T whipelii?

I'd like to be able to answer these questions!   :-X

- Is it possible that this bacteria plays a very substantial role in cancer diseases?

We cannot exclude it, if we accept the connection between persistent infection, chronic inflammation and cancerogenesis. Helicobacter pylori causes intestinal lymphomas and gastric cancer.

- Do you think that routine efforts to check for this bacteria and further understand the likelihood of its role in medical conditions listed on the following website as soon as a few of these symptoms are recognized (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/whipples-disease/DS00757/DSECTION=2) would help to substantially increase advanced detection of this bacteria, prevent more advanced illnesses and deaths, and thus save the medical industry money?

Give me some time to check this out...

-  Do you believe that until this bacteria is dressed up in threads of economics and globally paraded before the medical insurance industry as a profit thief that that industry will continue to underestimate it or overlook it?

Sometimes peculiar issues and rare disorders are ignored just like that: I would not always search for a hidden negative influence by medical insurance industry or others.
I tend to think that we need many more new smart brains most of all, honest enthusiastic researchers.  I've met many, maybe we need more.
Medical research about fastidious persistent germs could be partly supported by our govs and independent foundations.  Major pharmaceutical companies will follow


Thank you again for your insight and for your devotion to this subject.

I look forward to seeing what your responses to these questions are.

Thank you so much for your difficult questions:
I apologize right away for my short replies...
I prefer synthetic and condensed communication.
Regards,

ikod
« Last Edit: 28/08/2007 16:41:21 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #42 on: 22/08/2007 22:55:37 »

I overstressed on purpose intriguing reports from medical literature to open the discussion on how to find a cheap and easy way to avoid these treatable ailments going undetected for months and years, with all the human suffering involved.


In a few words, modern PCR technology will eventually allow us -in the near future- to develop special inexpensive microchips to detect by one simple blood test most of the germs that we carry 'on board'.

An infectious disease will be diagnosed in seconds starting from the germ this time, not from patients' medical history, signs and symptoms.

Quite a little revolution in clinical medicine, but today we do already use other 'screening' tests.
Of course we'll need top notch sensitivity and the highest number of bugs searched through a single test, to make it reliable, easy and cheap.
Unfortunately, these days we see some of this magic hightech show used mostly in forensic medicine.

ikodnotes   [^]







The Bug
What is it?
Where is it found?
How is it transmitted?
What diseases does it cause?
Who/what is at risk of infection?

click here for free full-text!
http://microbiology.mtsinai.on.ca/bug/TW/tw-bug.shtml 


« Last Edit: 18/09/2007 06:58:47 by iko »
 

Offline understudy

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #43 on: 01/09/2007 02:49:19 »
iko,

Thank you very much for your responses to my questions.

Kindly take notice of some relatively new findings regarding previous studies on the prevalence of Tropheryma whipplei in certain populations.

newbielink:http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1890548 [nonactive]

If this new study is accurate, then how does this affect the widely held belief that for those testing positive for the Tropheryma whipplei bacteria in their saliva that the bacteria itself is less responsible for disease than a defect in one's immune system or individual immunity to Tropheryma whipplei?   <<<<<<<this is the key question here!

Previous estimates have suggested that as many as 40% of the population carry Tropheryma whipplei in their saliva, and that only a small percentage of those testing positive for it have Whipple's disease - or one of the accepted forms of it.

Is it possible that the methods used in the new study could still have overlooked additional false positives, despite greatly reducing the prevalence of Trpheryma whipplei in the general population?

Am I misreading the data or are as much as 80% of the positives reviewed, in this May 2007 study, "false positives?"

Thank you again for your time and effort.
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #44 on: 17/09/2007 22:42:33 »
iko,

Thank you very much for your responses to my questions.

Kindly take notice of some relatively new findings regarding previous studies on the prevalence of Tropheryma whipplei in certain populations.


If this new study is accurate, then how does this affect the widely held belief that for those testing positive for the Tropheryma whipplei bacteria in their saliva that the bacteria itself is less responsible for disease than a defect in one's immune system or individual immunity to Tropheryma whipplei?   <<<<<<<this is the key question here!

Previous estimates have suggested that as many as 40% of the population carry Tropheryma whipplei in their saliva, and that only a small percentage of those testing positive for it have Whipple's disease - or one of the accepted forms of it.

Is it possible that the methods used in the new study could still have overlooked additional false positives, despite greatly reducing the prevalence of Trpheryma whipplei in the general population?

Am I misreading the data or are as much as 80% of the positives reviewed, in this May 2007 study, "false positives?"

Thank you again for your time and effort.


Thanks for your help overstudy;D

This contribution of yours shows us how fragile is our so called 'evidence' sometime.
Whipple bacteria are not anymore so common in humans as previously stated and we have to wait for properly arranged studies to know the percentage of 'healthy carriers' in our population.
We wanted to play the Helicobacter pylori game with Whipple too: common germ and few affected patients. No, this time is going to be different and maybe more complicated.
Of course, this is Whipple, the great granulomatous masquerader!

ikod  ;)







Still, impo*, we urgently need a cheap and reliable routine laboratory test for patients.

*) in my personal opinion
« Last Edit: 18/09/2007 06:55:40 by iko »
 

Offline understudy

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #45 on: 18/09/2007 07:38:31 »
iko,

Welcome back.

To celebrate your return, I'll ask a new question.

Do parasites co-exist with "Tropheryma whipplei" in human hosts?

Just asking.

Thank you so much, again.
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #46 on: 18/09/2007 13:56:40 »
Hi understudy,

I took a couple of weeks off in fact.
Now I'm back to the Whipplipedia forum!
Thank you for your precious support around here.
Parasites, defined as protozoa (Toxoplasma, Giardia, Amoebas etc.) or multicellular (Nematoda, Cestoda) like pinworms, surely may coexist in any patient affected by any bacterial infection, so supposedly even in Whipple disease.
In certain countries, people don't carry just one, but 2 or 3 different species of parasites per person, due to the precarious hygienic standards.
I don't remember a single case report of whipple disease and any parasitic infestation of sort.
That doesn't certainly mean that there aren't any!
Why are you interested in such a peculiar association?
Do you suspect an immune deficiency in WD patients?

Bacterial infections swich on different immune reactions.
Common bacteria stimulate antibody production and macrophages' appetite.
Intracellular (e.g. TB, WD) bacteria need a macrophage and T-Lymph more complex response.
Parasites and fungi as well require a T-Lymph compartment fully operative.
As you probably read before, years ago a slightly defective T-cell subset has been suspected to contribute to Whipple disease...but these data need confirmation, like those PCR results!  ;D

ikoD
« Last Edit: 21/09/2007 09:00:44 by iko »
 

Offline understudy

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #47 on: 22/09/2007 08:23:53 »
iko,

Sorry for my delay in responding.

Do most symptoms for a person suffering from parasites mimic those of a person suffering from a classic case of Whipple's disease?

Once antibiotic treatment for classic Whipple's disease is ongoing, should routine blood analysis show histaminase and basophils reacting as though one is being treated for parasites?

Are these just overlapping symptoms and reactions?

Thank you again.
 

Offline iko

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #48 on: 23/09/2007 22:13:00 »
iko,

Sorry for my delay in responding.

Do most symptoms for a person suffering from parasites mimic those of a person suffering from a classic case of Whipple's disease?

There are many different species of parasites and they cause a wide variety of symptoms, so the 'classic' presentation of Whipple's disease, diarrhea-fever-weightloss-anemia and joint pain may overlap a parasite infestation.
Anyway, parasites are carefully searched in any severe case of diarrhea.


Once antibiotic treatment for classic Whipple's disease is ongoing, should routine blood analysis show histaminase and basophils reacting as though one is being treated for parasites?

I cannot answer this question.
WD bacteria duplication time is very long: approx. 18days.
When you start antibiotic therapy bacteria don't die in a short time, and for this reason treatment has to be extended (at least one year).


Are these just overlapping symptoms and reactions?

Thank you again.

If you consider the previously reported cases, you'll find that WD may be misdiagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis or dermatomyositis, as sarcoidosis or even non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
In rare cases WD has been discovered as  the unsuspected cause of reversible dementia.
Whipple's disease has never been reported misdiagnosed as a parasite infestation.
Parasitic diseases are diagnosed by specific tests: it's easy to rule them out.
One exception could be intracellular protozoa like Toxoplasma and Babesia, but this is another story...

This is the aim of this thread: difficult diagnosis and -maybe in rare cases- the 'real' cause of diseases of uncertain(!) etiology.

ikod  [^]
« Last Edit: 23/09/2007 22:49:26 by iko »
 

Offline understudy

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Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #49 on: 24/09/2007 07:44:53 »
iko,

Let me thank you so much for your compelling response.

Intracellular parasitic infestation never misdiagnosed as a Whipple's disease?

It appears that "another story" is little understood and rapidly changing, even if intracellular parasites and Tropheryma Whipplei are mutually exclusive, which remains to be "seen."

Again, thank you for your fine work.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: What is Whipple's disease?
« Reply #49 on: 24/09/2007 07:44:53 »

 

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