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Poll

Well, should it?

Yes
4 (66.7%)
No
1 (16.7%)
They should put some clothes on first
1 (16.7%)

Total Members Voted: 6

Author Topic: Should The Naked Scientists be part of the school national curriculum?  (Read 5205 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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In my first 2 years at secondary school my science teachers were boring and consequently I didn't take a lot of interest. It wasn't until I reached the 3rd year and had a physics teacher called Mr Gupta that things perked up for me. He made physics really interesting, explaining things in everyday terms similar to the TNS broadcasts.

So, should TNS be added to schools' science lessons to make them more interesting and thence setting more kids on a career in science?


 

Offline Karen W.

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I like the idea .. I wish they had had something like this when I was a kid.. I hated Science, got a A but never remembered a thing! LOL maybe a thing or two!
 

Offline iblingim

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I first heard of you in university during filosofy lecture:)
 

Offline Karen W.

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I first heard of you in university during filosofy lecture:)

Who did you hear of during the lecture!
 

Offline iblingim

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Of Naked Scientists podcast. And I think it is great
 

Offline Karen W.

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They are great! Welcome to the site Ablingim!
 

Offline dentstudent

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I remember as a child that we used to listen to some radio history shows  - about Victorian England, The Forth Railway disaster and so on, but never science. If an element of TNS, eg. the gene extraction from Kitchen science could be integrated in some way, then absolutely! However, I don't think the general Q&A format would work as a lesson, but why not as a homework? (Oh, God, not more homework!     Please, let me finish!)

Education as far as I'm concerned should be a parent led thing, in that from a young age, children should be allowed to learn and be given opportunities wherever possible. They shouldn't be force-fed, of course, but invited as equals to learn. Education should not just left to teachers. Parents should provide the inspiration and forum for learning too! I think that the format of TNS provides an ideal opportunity for all the family to learn, together. And moreover, which family would not want to sit down as a unit, and listen to TNS?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Stuart - If we lived in an ideal world, I would totally agree with you. Unfortunately, though, many parents will not, or cannot, help their children with education. I would have thought that disadvantaged parents would be the most keen to help their children so they could have a better life; sadly that is not the case. Additionally, too many parents in poor areas are semi-, or totally, illiterate.

As I said in another thread, due to work I was doing recently I came into contact with many single parents seeking emergency accommodation. I was stunned by how many of them were unable to read the Housing Benefit application form let alone complete it. They were just about able to fill in their name & date of birth.

As such it cannot be left to parents, it has to be school-led.
 

Offline Karen W.

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I agree for the most part.. not every parent is cut out to do such things, not to say they have nothing to teach their children.. but thats not to say, there aren't other things parents can teach their children when unable to do the things skilled educated teachers have been trained to do and for the most part love to do for most of us!
« Last Edit: 18/06/2007 20:22:11 by Karen W. »
 

Offline dentstudent

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Stuart - If we lived in an ideal world, I would totally agree with you. Unfortunately, though, many parents will not, or cannot, help their children with education. I would have thought that disadvantaged parents would be the most keen to help their children so they could have a better life; sadly that is not the case. Additionally, too many parents in poor areas are semi-, or totally, illiterate.

As I said in another thread, due to work I was doing recently I came into contact with many single parents seeking emergency accommodation. I was stunned by how many of them were unable to read the Housing Benefit application form let alone complete it. They were just about able to fill in their name & date of birth.

As such it cannot be left to parents, it has to be school-led.

Yes, you're quite right, but my point was not that it should be left to the parents, but that they also have a responsibility. I know that, as with so many things, it just isn't possible in many situations. I'd just like to raise the point that the parents' responsibility for teaching has been generally lost, and that this concept that it the teachers responsibility and theirs alone for the education of our own children is faulty. But this is perhaps a side issue to the main debate!

Yes, it is desperate in some situations - my wife used to work as a housing officer in Worcester, I guess doing something very similar to your experience. But I think it still stands that TNS in its current format would not fit well into an hour's curriculum. I think that the more practical side would appeal more than a sit down theory lesson. It's about igniting the spark of interest, and I think that where attention spans are relatively short, active participation is more beneficial. There should be a WOW factor!

If the families are able to listen to TNS (in my little Utopian world), then this should be promoted, perhaps not as a "lesson" as such, but just because it's there. I would expect that there are many who are still unaware of its existance (unbelievably!).

There are also the disadvantaged who would actively support such a thing. They are in their situation through no fault of their own. So, I think that while of course there are those who don't want to or can't help in their children's education, I don't see why this should be the crux of whether it should be avaiable to all.

And so I go back to the Kitchen Science practicals in schools. The WOW thing needs to overcome the geek thing...
 

Offline science_guy

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it already is for me!  Thats where I'm posting from
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Stuart - Obviously the format of the TNS broadcasts is not suitable as is. I was thinking more of the way that TNS presents science as interesting, fun - yes, the WOW factor too.

As for the Q&A bit, I don't see any reason why teachers couldn't use that as a basis for a bit of fun in class; making up their own questions.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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it already is for me!  Thats where I'm posting from

Well stop skiving & get on with your work!  [:(!]
 

Offline Karen W.

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Hi Science Guy!
 

Offline dentstudent

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How is science taught at the moment? Who actually sets the syllabus? When is science as a topic first officially taught? I have no idea!

Perhaps, like a lot of things in the British education system, the topics are being introduced too late? My example is language - 12 and 13 is WAY to late to be introducing a language. Perhaps the gentle introduction to "fun science" needs to be brought in at the 6/7/8 year old stage, if not earlier, and not necessarily called science either - it may be the name alone that causes a stereotypical knee-jerk reaction. Call it "How things work" or similar (oh, I'm great at making names up!). My eldest goes to Kindergarten (he's 3) and once a week they go outside into the woods or wherever for Nature Day. In the summer, they'll be going out every day for a week into a camp, and collecting stuff. They are already being integrated into their environment, and although they're not necessarily "learning science" they are laying the foundations that there is actually a world outside. This is perhaps where a child might begin to like natural things, which may evolve into any aspect of science.
 

Offline Karen W.

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I teach Science to My preschoolers it is set up in the curriculum!
 

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