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Author Topic: Starting a fire with paper  (Read 5957 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Starting a fire with paper
« on: 16/06/2007 09:42:18 »
I tried to light a fire at the stables yesterday so I could boil a pot of water to have a cuppa. I normally use old newspaper but all I had was a glossy magazine (no... not 1 of those magazines!). It was a lot harder to light than newspaper and I really struggled to get the fire going.

Why is glossy magazine paper harder to light than newspaper?


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #1 on: 16/06/2007 09:43:47 »
While we're at it, does anyone have any good tips for getting a fire going?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #2 on: 16/06/2007 09:52:36 »
yes on the tips..you could keep a nice box of left over candles in the barn then drizzle it over your paper or wood.

Every winter I buy 10 lb block of wax from a local craft store.. then I save all of my sawdust from cutting the wood and allow it to dry. then I save several cardboard egg cartons I then pour a small amount of wood sawdust into the carton and melt a chunk of my wax over the stove drizzle hot wax over the sawdust and allow it to soak down into the sawdust and wood chips. when they have all been filled with both, allow it to cool then cut the cartons apart and take a pail of your new fire starter to the barn and store there for a rainy cold day, or just your cuppa! Otherwise keep a bit of wax close by for quick fire starter!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #3 on: 16/06/2007 09:57:35 »
 The leftover chunks from burned candles add up and can be used in a pinch! You can also roll your own logs by dipping newspaper in a pan of dish soap and water, get a paper roller start rolling your newspaper on after dipping them . take the paper log off and allow several weeks to dry.. they burn nicely! recycling newspaper. Helpful when you run out of wood and it is 18 degrees outside!..
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #4 on: 16/06/2007 10:22:23 »
But I want my cuppa now, not next year!  >:(
 

paul.fr

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #5 on: 16/06/2007 15:55:55 »
Don't you watch Ray Mears? try buying a cheap lighting flint, Doc http://www.whipperleys.co.uk/acatalog/fire_steels_flint_fire_starters_tinder.html

From experiance, i have never had a problem lighting any kind of paper. I would (perhaps wrongly) suggest the type of coating on the paper or something to do with the weather conditions over the last few days.

 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #6 on: 17/06/2007 07:47:33 »
But I want my cuppa now, not next year!  >:(

 I knew you would say that!..LOL I am too long winded! LOL! That's why I said candle wax..  so it would be quick.. You can keep a box of candles for an emergency, except a barn is really not the best place for candles and matches.. But you could be safe and create a romantic area in the barn for you and yours.. LOL, and you would be prepared whenever you took a fancy for a nice cuppa! LOL
« Last Edit: 17/06/2007 07:49:22 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #7 on: 17/06/2007 07:51:18 »
Don't you watch Ray Mears? try buying a cheap lighting flint, Doc http://www.whipperleys.co.uk/acatalog/fire_steels_flint_fire_starters_tinder.html

From experiance, i have never had a problem lighting any kind of paper. I would (perhaps wrongly) suggest the type of coating on the paper or something to do with the weather conditions over the last few days.



LOL LOL DO I really have to edit your post??? LOL  DO IT YOUR SELF!!! LOL LOL..Your so funny! LOL HEE HEE HEE!
 

another_someone

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #8 on: 17/06/2007 10:12:02 »
Not sure that coating as such would be as much an issue, but probably more to do with the fibres of the paper, and contact between the paper and air.

Good quality paper has a smooth surface, and thus relatively low surface area, so less exposed area where paper is in contact with air.

Also, I would imagine that with poor quality paper, the fibres are more loosely bound together, so making it easier for air to get between the fibres.

There would also be a question about the length and type of fibre.  Poor quality paper would have shorter fibres (probably more recycled paper).
 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #9 on: 17/06/2007 10:51:20 »
 I never thought about how the paper was made  as far as fibers and things..we always dipped and rolled newspapers .. I was the local paper girl for about 5 years LOL Then I did it again with my children for about 4 or 5 more years.. taught them how to drive on the paper route. It was a huge route so in the winter driving was a must! My daughter rode her horse during the summer and  her customers put up hitching posts outside of their houses so she could tie the horse for collection day! LOL you can imagine we had newspapers coming out of our ears so we made use of the old  extra papers by using them to roll into fire logs! LOL
 

Offline eric l

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #10 on: 17/06/2007 15:01:59 »
Not sure that coating as such would be as much an issue, but probably more to do with the fibres of the paper, and contact between the paper and air.


Newspapers are printed on "newsprint", a paper grade that used to be essentially groundwood (mechanical pulp) without any coating or charges.  Because of this, it also has a relatively open (porous) structure.
Magazines, glossy or other, are printed on paper that is generally both charged and coated.  Charged means that minerals (china clay, calcium carbonate or other) are added to the pulp in the papermaking stage.  This results in a more opaque paper, with less chance of showing true (meaning that you would see what is printed on the reverse side).  Charging will mean that you have a certain amount of incombustible material, and you will end up with more ash.
Glossy magazines are printed on coated paper, which means that after the papermaking, a layer or coat is put on both sides containing mainly white pigments (often china clay and calcium carbonate again) and binders.  You also end up with a less porous paper.
Currently, even newsprint is slightly charged.  This is mainly due to the increasing use of "secondary fibre", an expensive term for recycled waste paper, which is bound to contain charges and coating pigments.
 

Offline dentstudent

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #11 on: 18/06/2007 08:34:55 »
Fire making depends on your level of acceptable "cheatiness". Obviously, fire lighters, 4 liters of petrol and a good head-start are favourites. As a bit of a fire-lighting purist, I like to light our stove with forest product. So I have some dried birch bark, which you scrape the outer bark into a small pile, some dried moss or bracken to use instead of paper (lots of surface area), and spruce kindling which lights very well. The birch bark catches sparks really well, and burns quickly, so get the bracken onto it fast! Then small diameter kindling of perhaps 5mm diameter, before some larger stuff. The key with kindling is surface area, so split wood is better than twigs. If you have this stuff collected and dried, it'll take about a minute to get to this stage. Then just add bigger bits of wood to build. Cuppa in no time!

(Just milk for me please)
 

Offline Karen W.

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #12 on: 19/06/2007 19:06:28 »
 That is good.. except that no one splits the wood around here anymore, the tiny Kindling really does help though! Makes a big difference!
 

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Starting a fire with paper
« Reply #12 on: 19/06/2007 19:06:28 »

 

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