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Author Topic: what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?  (Read 10841 times)

Offline kdlynn

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« on: 28/06/2007 08:04:55 »
i have been trying to research this all day, and they seem to have the same symptoms... anyone know the real difference?


 

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Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #2 on: 28/06/2007 08:08:28 »
I do not even know what the second one is! post menstual.....depression...????I don't know!
 

Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #3 on: 28/06/2007 08:13:24 »
I do not even know what the second one is! post menstual.....depression...????I don't know!

Nice link Stuart!
 

Offline kdlynn

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #4 on: 28/06/2007 08:20:48 »
well... that was far more informative than anything else i've read. thanks stuart! my doctor told me to keep a record of my symptoms for a few months. my mom used to have to be on some kind of medicine for pms a long time ago, and suddenly in the past year i've gone completely wacky a week or so before my period starts. i wonder if there are treatments other than antidepressants. i guess i should find out for sure if i actually have this disorder first...
 

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #5 on: 28/06/2007 08:24:13 »
It is good to be informed..things like that happened to me after my first pregnancy my hormones got all weird and have never been the same since!
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #6 on: 28/06/2007 10:10:47 »
Hi kdlynn,

I know I'm boring and play the same song
all the time. Sorry.
It's my duty around here.
Cod liver oil plus yoghurt!
Do you like my recipe?
Take care

funkod  [:o)]



Calcium and vitamin D intake and risk of incident premenstrual syndrome.

Bertone-Johnson ER, Hankinson SE, Bendich A, Johnson SR, Willett WC, Manson JE.
Department of Public Health, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 01003-9304, USA. ebertone@schoolph.umass.edu

BACKGROUND: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is one of the most common disorders of premenopausal women. Studies suggest that blood calcium and vitamin D levels are lower in women with PMS and that calcium supplementation may reduce symptom severity, but it is unknown whether these nutrients may prevent the initial development of PMS.
METHODS: We conducted a case-control study nested within the prospective Nurses' Health Study II cohort. Participants were a subset of women aged 27 to 44 years and free from PMS at baseline in 1991, including 1057 women who developed PMS over 10 years of follow-up and 1968 women reporting no diagnosis of PMS and no or minimal menstrual symptoms. Intake of calcium and vitamin D was measured in 1991, 1995, and 1999 by a food frequency questionnaire.
RESULTS: After adjustment for age, parity, smoking status, and other risk factors, women in the highest quintile of total vitamin D intake (median, 706 IU/d) had a relative risk of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.86) compared with those in the lowest quintile (median, 112 IU/d) (P = .01 for trend). The intake of calcium from food sources was also inversely related to PMS; compared with women with a low intake (median, 529 mg/d), participants with the highest intake (median, 1283 mg/d) had a relative risk of 0.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.97) (P = .02 for trend). The intake of skim or low-fat milk was also associated with a lower risk (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS: A high intake of calcium and vitamin D may reduce the risk of PMS. Large-scale clinical trials addressing this issue are warranted. Given that calcium and vitamin D may also reduce the risk of osteoporosis and some cancers, clinicians may consider recommending these nutrients even for younger women.

Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 13;165(11):1246-52.






...1 out of 9240 "beautiful sunrise" from GoogleImages!
« Last Edit: 28/06/2007 10:17:33 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #7 on: 28/06/2007 10:47:30 »
There are over 3000 citations on PubMed
database for "premenstrual syndrome" and
nine cross with "vitamin D"...easy uh?

This is a positive report from 13years ago,
gives you the idea that there is no interest
in confirming this type of evidence:

Vitamin D and calcium in menstrual migraine.

Thys-Jacobs S.
Two premenopausal women with a history of menstrually-related migraines and premenstrual syndrome were treated with a combination of vitamin D and elemental calcium for late luteal phase symptoms. Both cited a major reduction in their headache attacks as well as premenstrual symptomatology within 2 months of therapy. These observations suggest that vitamin D and calcium therapy should be considered in the treatment of migraine headaches.

Headache. 1994 Oct;34(9):544-6.





In any case dear Kadie, speeding up at almost 40posts/day, you do need some vitamin support!
« Last Edit: 28/06/2007 18:33:47 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #8 on: 28/06/2007 11:05:07 »
Beautiful sunrise Iko!
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #9 on: 28/06/2007 11:54:22 »
Thanks Karen,

I'll be arrested one of these days, and put on a copyright-trial for all these pics!

madkod [B)]


 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #10 on: 28/06/2007 14:04:36 »
BTW this is part of the new villa
I'm gonna buy thanks to a generous
contribution by the CLO industry!
Is not it simply gorgeous?

richkod ;D




...sorry about that, but business is business my friendos!  [8D]
« Last Edit: 28/06/2007 14:18:46 by iko »
 

Offline kdlynn

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #11 on: 28/06/2007 16:25:01 »
hmmm... well i already take a calcium supplement that also had vitamin d in it. it's 600 mg or calcium and... some vitamin d. lol. the bottle was dropped into a sinkful of water and i can't read that part. it got scraped off.
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #12 on: 28/06/2007 18:26:06 »
hmmm... well i already take a calcium supplement that also had vitamin d in it. it's 600 mg or calcium and... some vitamin d. lol. the bottle was dropped into a sinkful of water and i can't read that part. it got scraped off.

Check if it's vitamin D2 or D3.
CLO with D3 is 4times more powerful,
plus vitamin A and omega-3 good 4U.
Vitamin D2 is synthetic and cheaper:




Messing with synthetic compounds
instead of the natural recipe
may lead to make wrong deductions
and to realize it many years later:



The case against ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) as a vitamin supplement.


Houghton LA, Vieth R.
School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, Canada.

Supplemental vitamin D is available in 2 distinct forms: ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). Pharmacopoeias have officially regarded these 2 forms as equivalent and interchangeable, yet this presumption of equivalence is based on studies of rickets prevention in infants conducted 70 y ago. The emergence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D as a measure of vitamin D status provides an objective, quantitative measure of the biological response to vitamin D administration. As a result, vitamin D3 has proven to be the more potent form of vitamin D in all primate species, including humans. Despite an emerging body of evidence suggesting several plausible explanations for the greater bioefficacy of vitamin D3, the form of vitamin D used in major preparations of prescriptions in North America is vitamin D2. The case that vitamin D2 should no longer be considered equivalent to vitamin D3 is based on differences in their efficacy at raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, diminished binding of vitamin D2 metabolites to vitamin D binding protein in plasma, and a nonphysiologic metabolism and shorter shelf life of vitamin D2. Vitamin D2, or ergocalciferol, should not be regarded as a nutrient suitable for supplementation or fortification.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Oct;84(4):694-7.





Comment: (from a reknown website)
http://www.mercola.com/2006/oct/26/beware-of-most-prescription-vitamin-d-supplements.htm

...Supplemental vitamin D comes in two forms: ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3).
They have generally been regarded as equivalent and interchangeable, but that notion is based on studies of rickets prevention in infants conducted seven decades ago.
Recent studies have shown that  vitamin D3 is a more potent form of vitamin D. Vitamin D2 has a shorter shelf life, and its metabolites bind with protein poorly, making it less effective. One unit of cod liver oil (containing vitamin D3) has been shown to be as effective as four units of Viosterol (a medicinal preparation of vitamin D2).
However, the form of vitamin D used in prescriptions in North America is almost invariably vitamin D2.
...


from Dr. Mercola's notes:

Basically there are two types of oral vitamin D supplements. The natural ones are D3, and they contain the same vitamin D your body makes when exposed to sunshine. The synthetic ones are vitamin D2, which are sometimes called ergocalciferol.
Once either form of the vitamin is in your body, it needs to be converted to a more active form. Vitamin D3 is converted 500 percent faster than vitamin D2. Interestingly, it was previously thought that the kidney exclusively performed this function, as least that is what I was taught in med school.
However, in 1998 Dr. Michael Hollick, the person who discovered activated vitamin D, showed that many other cells in your body can make this conversion, but they use it themselves, and it is only the kidney that makes enough to distribute to the rest of your body.
While there have been no clinical trials to date demonstrating conclusively that D2 prevents fractures, every clinical trial of D3 has shown it does.
However, nearly all the prescription-based supplements contain synthetic vitamin D2, which was first produced in the 1920s through ultraviolet exposure of foods. The process was patented and licensed to drug companies for use in prescription vitamins. In case you didn't know, the vitamin D that is added to milk is NOT D3 but the highly inferior vitamin D2.
The study linked above concluded that "vitamin D2 should no longer be regarded as a nutrient appropriate for supplementation or fortification of foods."

That being said, optimizing your sun exposure and levels of vitamin D3 may, indeed, be one of the most important physical steps you can take in support of your long-term health. Conventional medicine is finally beginning to get on board the vitamin-D3 bandwagon, using the natural power of sunshine to treat type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis during a woman's pregnancy and even tuberculosis.
It is important to understand that the ideal and STRONGLY preferred method of increasing your vitamin D3 level is through appropriate sun exposure. I really do not advise oral supplements, not even cod liver oil now, UNLESS you can have your blood levels regularly monitored. 
It just is too risky. I have seen too many potentially dangerous elevations of vitamin D levels, including my own, from those that are taking oral supplements.
But when you get your vitamin D from appropriate sun exposure your body can indeed self-regulate and greatly reduce vitamin D production if you don't need it, which makes it very difficult to overdose on vitamin D from sun exposure.




Even taking for granted that omega-3 and retinol were not needed together with vitamin D, the alternative to cod liver oil for leukemic children would be driving them for a hike in the sunshine three times a week...for at least 5-7 years after diagnosis.
I'd need a big school-bus and sunny days most of the year. I wouldn't be able to retire right now, and they couldn't miss their classes.
Mission Impossible from my point of view (ask Tom Cruise).

These little patients are tough: they could certainly take a risk of a slight vitamin D intoxication...most of the current treatment protocols are far more toxic.
Moderate use of cod liver oil is harmless, actually good for all of us.
It has always been like that.


ikod

Addendum:

Vitamin D As Treatment

How much vitamin D should one take if they have cancer? We don't know as the research is far from complete. Although vitamin D may help, it should only be taken in addition to standard cancer treatment. It should not be considered a first, or only, treatment but used in addition to regular chemotherapy or surgery. Oncologists and surgeons work miracles every day. Remember, vitamin D may be toxic in overdose, although one expert recently said, "worrying about vitamin D toxicity is like worrying about drowning when you are dying of thirst". That said, many people think "if a little is good then a lot is better". This is definitely not true about vitamin D.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.com/cancerMain.shtml


...in the meantime, waiting for scientific confirmation, a little bit of 'cod' every day should work just fine. ;)

Take care

ikod
« Last Edit: 28/06/2007 21:57:13 by iko »
 

Offline kdlynn

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #13 on: 28/06/2007 18:33:08 »
it is d2... interesting
 

Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #14 on: 28/06/2007 19:06:09 »
BTW this is part of the new villa
I'm gonna buy thanks to a generous
contribution by the CLO industry!
Is not it simply gorgeous?

richkod ;D




...sorry about that, but business is business my friendos!  [8D]

Your right Iko It is absolutely breath taking.. the water is the bluest I have ever seen.. Gorgeous! Congrates!!
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #15 on: 28/06/2007 19:27:02 »
;D Hey Karen,

this is my pool, not the sea!!
Actually the other two pools
in the back are a bit darker.
Bliiissssss

CodFather   [8D]
 

Offline iko

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #16 on: 28/06/2007 19:35:38 »
it is d2... interesting

Yes kdlynn,

last Fall, when the article revealing that vitamin D3 is much superior came out, it made me so happy, because I had been giving cod liver oil to my mum (plus 1yogurt + multivitamin + miniaspirin) for years, hoping to prevent osteoporosis.  Her mother had practically died from it and had suffered so much (no sunlight, no milk, no cheese for most of her life!).
Now she's enthusiastic about her bones. Once she fell down the stairs; plenty of bruises, no fracture and she was so proud to tell me: "no osteoporosis! I just had my test done!"
Before those recent reports, several trials with vitamin D2 and calcium to prevent and treat osteoporosis in the elderly had given negative results...I was so disappointed.  Now I know that 1 multivitamin/day only without 'cod' wouldn't had been enough.  She also takes blueberry caps, decided this all by herself, and now she is totally convinced that her eyesight is much much better than before!
Talking about placebo effects!
Anyway we enjoy all this, we don't have time to wait for any scientific confirmation.  These things don't have much money behind, and get easily scientifically neglected. And you actually see the result: an error of approx. factor 4 magnitude has been corrected just few months ago, after 70 years of miscalculations.
Take care

ikod

P.S.
I must say that convincing my mother to take some cod liver oil was not difficult at all, because of her family history (1).  Perhaps she might have been a bit surprised that after so many years there seems to be nothing newer and more effective...

1) click down here to read the story:
You clever Janetah,

I mentioned it, but I couldn't ever imagine anybody asking about it!

It's always been a mystery that my grandma and my mother told us over the years.
Back in the late '20s my grandfather was about 40 and got 'sick': weakness, no fever, no pain, just anorexia and weight loss.
...



« Last Edit: 30/06/2007 23:10:05 by iko »
 

Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #17 on: 28/06/2007 22:59:52 »
;D Hey Karen,

this is my pool, not the sea!!
Actually the other two pools
in the back are a bit darker.
Bliiissssss

CodFather   [8D]

I like both! Very beautiful indeed!...LOL The CODFATHER..HEE HEE HEE! Your so funny!
 

Offline Karen W.

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
« Reply #18 on: 28/06/2007 23:05:12 »
it is d2... interesting



Yes kdlynn,

last Fall, when the article revealing that vitamin D3 is much superior came out, it made me so happy, because I had been giving cod liver oil to my mum (plus 1yogurt + multivitamin + miniaspirin) for years, hoping to prevent osteoporosis.  Her mother had practically died from it and had suffered so much (no sunlight, no milk, no cheese for most of her life!).
Now she's enthusiastic about her bones. Once she fell down the stairs; plenty of bruises, no fracture and she was so proud to tell me: "no osteoporosis! I just had my test done!"
Before those recent reports, several trials with vitamin D2 and calcium to prevent and treat osteoporosis in the elderly had given negative results...I was so disappointed.  Now I know that 1 multivitamin/day only without 'cod' wouldn't had been enough.  She also takes blueberry caps, decided this all by herself, and now is perfectly convinced that her eyesight is much much better than before!
Talking about placebo effects!
Anyway we enjoy all this, we don't have time to wait for any scientific confirmation.  These things don't have much money behind, and get easily scientifically neglected. And you actually see the result: an error of approx. factor 4 magnitude corrected after 70 years of miscalculations.
Take care

ikod

P.S.
I must say that convincing my mother to take some cod liver oil was not difficult at all, because of her family history (1).  Perhaps she might be a bit surprised that after so many years there seems to be nothing newer and more effective...

1) click down here to read the story:
You clever Janetah,

I mentioned it, but I couldn't ever imagine anybody asking about it!

It's always been a mystery that my grandma and my mother told us over the years.
Back in the late '20s my grandfather was about 40 and got 'sick': weakness, no fever, no pain, just anorexia and weight loss.
...





I wish my mother in law would take the stuff as she has osteoporosis  and could really use it. Does it help even after the onset.. could it help at all!
« Last Edit: 29/06/2007 06:56:02 by Karen W. »
 

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what's the difference between PMS and PMDD?
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