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Author Topic: superconductor avalability  (Read 2922 times)

Offline david-s

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superconductor avalability
« on: 30/06/2007 21:40:17 »
HI GUYS.

I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT SUPERCONDUCTORS.

I WOULD LIKE TO HAVE ANY INFORMATION ABOUT THE AVAILABILITY OF HTS SUPERCONDUCTORS, WHERE CAN I PURCHASE THEM, AND ESTIMATED COSTS.

I'M INTERESTED ESPECIALLY IN Nb Ti coils AND superconducting bulk plates (made of YBaCuO, or yttrium barium copper oxide)

THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION.


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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superconductor avalability
« Reply #1 on: 30/06/2007 23:08:39 »
Don't expect you'll find any experts round here but googling your question produces loads of material for example  http://www.advancedsupercon.com/  as a european supplier but you do not give any information about where you are located.
 

Offline david-s

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superconductor avalability
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2007 19:04:03 »
Soul Surfer thanks very much indeed for your reply.
As for your question  : I'm from Israel.
I'll appreciate any more information, so if by chance you have more ideas or answers for my questions,I'll be gratefull again.

thanks DAVID.
 

Offline safertr

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superconductor avalability
« Reply #3 on: 05/07/2007 15:04:56 »
Superconductivity is both an old and a new field of research. This phenomenon, where metals undergo a transition to a state of zero electrical resistance, was first discovered in 1911, shortly after Kammerlingh-Onnes first produced liquid helium. The superconducting state of matter has fascinated scientists for decades with its strange properties and puzzling origins. The properties of superconductors were so unexpected that it took decades to explore the many phenomena that they exhibit and it wasn't until 1957 that a satisfactory explanation was produced by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer.

Over these decades and through to the 1970's many elements and compounds were found to be superconducting, with one of the goals being to produce materials with higher superconducting transition temperatures. This was a driving force because the need to use liquid helium to access the low temperatures required for a metal to become a superconductor stood in the way of many possible applications of these materials. The exception to this roadblock has been the development of superconducting electromagnets, used both in research and in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For a period of time the quest to find superconductors with higher critical temperatures appeared to languish, but in 1986, Bednörz and Müller threw the field wide open again when they discovered a family of copper oxide compounds with high superconducting transition temperatures. Their discovery was quickly followed by the discovery of YBa2Cu3O7-x, a compound that becomes superconducting at 93 Kelvin, a temperature well above the boiling point of nitrogen (77 Kelvin).
newbielink:http://www.click2finding.com/click2.aspx?pr=Science/Physics/Particle/ [nonactive]
Since 1987, these new high temperature superconductors have become one of the dominant topics of research in condensed matter physics. For many, the lure of possible applications of these new materials is driving a lively push towards exploiting the availability of superconductivity at liquid nitrogen temperatures ("high temperature" by a condensed matter physicists's standards). Others continue the quest to find members of the family with ever higher superconducting transition temperatures (the present record is around 135 Kelvin, almost halfway to room temperature). For many of us, the real lure is that this is one of the great unsolved problems in all of physics. Despite our deep understanding of conventional superconductors and the huge number of scientists who have been working on this problem, we still don't really understand how high temperature superconductors work. In fact it seems very much like the situation that Kamerlingh-Onnes and his contemporaries faced decades ago; we have a state of matter that is in many ways different from anything that our field of research has had to tackle before.
 

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superconductor avalability
« Reply #3 on: 05/07/2007 15:04:56 »

 

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