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Author Topic: Is static electricity potentially an alterantive to vacuuming?  (Read 7295 times)

Offline dentstudent

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Instead of doing the vacuuming chore (yeah, like I do that!) would it be possible to have something in the house, perhaps each room, that was statically charged, which would then attract the dust?
« Last Edit: 29/09/2013 10:08:07 by chris »


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #1 on: 11/07/2007 07:47:43 »
It's called my PC monitor screen  [:(!]
 

Offline Karen W.

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #2 on: 11/07/2007 09:31:05 »
Mine too!LOL

How would that work Stuart?? My brain is not thinking Kind of like when my dress clings to my leg.. you mean the static would attract the dust eh?
 

Offline dentstudent

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #3 on: 11/07/2007 15:31:49 »
Yes, that's right. As you and Eth are patently aware, static tends to be a breeding ground for dust, and so I was wondering whether this could be put to use in creating a dust-free or a dust-reduced zone. Perhaps even a static "wand" that you can move about (that sounds like an oxymoron).
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #4 on: 11/07/2007 16:13:55 »
*dashes off to the patent office*
 

Offline Karen W.

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #5 on: 11/07/2007 18:31:35 »
Yes, that's right. As you and Eth are patently aware, static tends to be a breeding ground for dust, and so I was wondering whether this could be put to use in creating a dust-free or a dust-reduced zone. Perhaps even a static "wand" that you can move about (that sounds like an oxymoron).

That is interesting!
 

another_someone

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #6 on: 11/07/2007 19:49:52 »
Yes, that's right. As you and Eth are patently aware, static tends to be a breeding ground for dust, and so I was wondering whether this could be put to use in creating a dust-free or a dust-reduced zone. Perhaps even a static "wand" that you can move about (that sounds like an oxymoron).

You can get dusters that are electrostaticaly charged (or become easily charged as they run against the surface they are dusting).  The trouble is that these only pick up dust on the surface they rub against, and not elsewhere.

You can also get air purifiers that feed air both through filters, and through electrostatic plates (at least, I used to have something like that - these days, I only see them with ionisers, rather than electrostatic plates).  The problem is that while these are quite good at removing airborne dust, they don't do much for the dust that has settled and does not become airborne.
 

another_someone

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #7 on: 11/07/2007 19:52:48 »
Instead of doing the vacuuming chore (yeah, like I do that!) would it be possible to have something in the house

The Japanese are working on having a robot that will do the vacuuming for you - and I think there may already be a self propelled vacuum cleaner out there.  Could be a problem when the vacuum cleaner picks up something you did not want vacuumed up, or gets itself chocked with something - so maybe would still require some human supervision.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #8 on: 11/07/2007 20:35:34 »
a rumba is available here a tiny round hover craft like thing that detects chair legs and boundry limits and vacumes accoringly until whole area is cleaned!
 

Offline dentstudent

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #9 on: 12/07/2007 07:22:33 »
If you started with a clean carpet etc, would it be possible to have enough static to stop further dust settleing? Of course, it depends on the size of the room, but theoretically?

My other vacuum avoidence method would be to have some sort of circular air flow, so that, at least some of the dust would be removed and vented while still airborne. Some sort of floorboard based suction.......

???
 

another_someone

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #10 on: 12/07/2007 23:53:29 »
If you started with a clean carpet etc, would it be possible to have enough static to stop further dust settleing? Of course, it depends on the size of the room, but theoretically?


Problem, as I see it, is that dust is just another piece of matter, and not only dust is attracted by electrostatic fields.  If you have enough electrostatic force to pick up a piece of dust from 10 feet away, you probably have more than enough to pick up a large piece of paper near by (in fact, you probably have a strong enough voltage to cause an electrical discharge through the air).

My other vacuum avoidence method would be to have some sort of circular air flow, so that, at least some of the dust would be removed and vented while still airborne. Some sort of floorboard based suction.......

If you have enough air moving around the room, it can certainly stop most of the dust from settling, but it could get quite drafty.  Again, you have the problem that if you have enough force to pick up dust in every nook and cranny throughout the room, it will probably pick up a lot else besides (anything that is reasonably light, and particularly if it has high air resistance, such as a flat piece of paper of light cloth).
 

Online Atomic-S

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #11 on: 16/07/2007 06:34:57 »
Electrostatic devices alone will probably not do this job. I think some kind of air circulation is indispensible to dust control, and now we are talking about what kind of a air conditioning & heating system you have. These machines do cut down on dust, and filter whatever gets into the air. Of course, stuff that does not get into the air is largely unaffected. Maybe with a real fast ceiling fan you could generate an artificial tornado that would take care of the problem. By the way, are you aware that much of the dust that comes into a building does not blow in but is tracked in on shoes? It is said that good doormats do a lot to cut down on floor cleaning work. Preferably a commercial outdoor carpet. speaking of which: what kind of a floor do you have? Non-carpeted floors clean more easily than carpeted floors. Carpets trap dust, of course, which might be OK if the dust stayed in the carpet, but unfortuantley it will tend to be kicked up whenever walked upon. The best kind of floor, maintenance wise, however, is one of grille meshwork, underlain by some kind of a waterproof pan, with water connections and sewer connections. All dirt falls through the grillwork, and when enough builds up to be noticeable, you just push a flush handle and the whole works is sent to the wastewater treatment plant.
« Last Edit: 16/07/2007 06:37:05 by Atomic-S »
 

another_someone

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Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #12 on: 16/07/2007 10:30:40 »
Certainly, clean rooms have both positive air pressure and stick mats to remove dust from shoes.

Nonetheless, the other source of dust is human skin (so if you want a really clean room, make sure you are well covered up).  Again, I suspect that if you walk around in the house barefoot (as I often do), then abrasion from carpets will probably remove more skin than much solid flooring would.
 

Offline shanewoods21

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Re: Static instead of vacuuming
« Reply #13 on: 29/09/2013 09:09:02 »
If you started with a clean carpet etc, would it be possible to have enough static to stop further dust settleing? Of course, newbielink:http://www.carpetcleanerking.com.au/carpet-cleaning-brisbane/ [nonactive]depends on the size of the room, but theoretically?

My other vacuum
newbielink:http://www.carpetcleanerking.com.au/carpet-cleaning-sunshine-coast/ [nonactive]avoidence method would be to have some sort of circular air flow, so that, at least some of the dust would be removed and vented while still airborne. Some sort of floorboard based suction.......

???
I am not sure there is any better way of removing dust than vacuuming.. Yes we can use light pressure vacuum for smooth work..Vacuum cleaner is ideal for dusting any section of our home
« Last Edit: 29/09/2013 16:19:52 by shanewoods21 »
 

Offline wolfekeeper

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It's been proposed to use electrostatics on the moon, to deal with moon dust. Dust is a real nuisance on the moon; it's very abrasive and spikey; and tends to destroy seals and damage metal, when it gets on surfaces it's like sandpaper.

And for obvious reasons vacuuming doesn't work very well on the moon.

The proposal I saw was to use a sort of electrostatic linear motor; you cyclically charge up strips of metal in a sequence, and it grabs the dust and flings it off in a particular direction. Presumably this could be done on the Earth too; but I'm not sure how well it would work, I suspect a normal vacuum would be a lot more powerful.
 

Offline dlorde

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Air ionisers (as used, for example, by allergy sufferers) are quite a popular form of electrostatic precipitator. They can reduce the concentration of dust and pollen grains in the air.
 

Online Atomic-S

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If you are going to attract dust with some kind of a local charged object that then moves and discards it into a collection bag, I am wondering if the proximity of the charged object to the surface will polarize it in such a way that it will tend to attract the dust slightly, and because the dust is closer to it than to the "vacuuming" object, the dust will stay where it is. The way to get rid of that problem is to agitate the surface,jarring the dust loose.
 

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