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Offline goofkid

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Maybe it is true....maybe not
« on: 14/07/2007 08:50:25 »
I heard that the gravitational pull of the moon affects the ocean tides. That is a fact. (on a full moon i think the tides are highest)..
anyways...the doubtfull part is that i also heard that if the gravitational pull of a moon affects water, it affects fish behavior, and also ...it affects the mood of humans (some statistics have shown that suicide rates are highest during full moon nights or something like that)

Also...the salt:water ratio of the sea has been calculated to be the same as the salt:water ratio in a mother's womb.....suggesting that we originated from the sea maybe..


 

another_someone

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« Reply #1 on: 14/07/2007 14:42:04 »
I heard that the gravitational pull of the moon affects the ocean tides. That is a fact. (on a full moon i think the tides are highest)..
anyways...the doubtfull part is that i also heard that if the gravitational pull of a moon affects water, it affects fish behavior, and also ...it affects the mood of humans (some statistics have shown that suicide rates are highest during full moon nights or something like that)

There would be good reason for most life to be affected by the cycles of the moon.

In the days before artificial light would light up our streets at night, the phases of the moon would determine the amount of light available during the night for nocturnal wanderings and other activities that might need a little light.  Even today, when one gets away from the lights of the city, this becomes significantly true, and will certainly be true for life that is living well away from human habitation.

Aside from that, the tides effect weather (the pull of the Moon will have direct effects upon the weather as well), and weather itself will effect mood, as well as what one is able to do outdoors.

I doubt that humans are directly sensitive to the pull of the Moon (although maybe someone will show otherwise), but I have no doubt that humans are acutely sensitive to the secondary effects of the Moon upon the Earth.

Also...the salt:water ratio of the sea has been calculated to be the same as the salt:water ratio in a mother's womb.....suggesting that we originated from the sea maybe..

Humans are mammals, and mammals are animals, and all animals at some time in the past originated in the sea.

There is a theory known as the aquatic ape theory that suggests that humans, as they diverged from other apes, spent some of their time living on the shoreline, half in the sea, half on land (rather like seals).  The theory is not mainstream, but it does exist.

As to how relevant the salt ratio in the womb might be would be more meaningful if one compared it to the salt ratio in the womb of all animals.  If all mammals have a similar salt ratio in the womb (as I would suspect is probably true), then the salt ratio in the human womb tells us nothing specifically about the human species, and the theory that all animals originated in the sea is what is generally believed anyway.

In any case, I imagine the equivalence is only approximate, since the salinity of the sea itself changes over time, and is not the same everywhere in the world.
« Last Edit: 14/07/2007 14:43:57 by another_someone »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Maybe it is true....maybe not
« Reply #2 on: 14/07/2007 15:51:22 »
I would say it is possible for the moon to affect us in a way that we havent found out yet.

There are many marine creatures that use the full moon as a triger for their breeding cycle ,some on the same full moon each year..

Some live so deep they cant even see when its a full moon and yet they still migrate or breed during it..
 

another_someone

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« Reply #3 on: 14/07/2007 16:17:05 »
I would say it is possible for the moon to affect us in a way that we havent found out yet.

There are many marine creatures that use the full moon as a triger for their breeding cycle ,some on the same full moon each year..

Some live so deep they cant even see when its a full moon and yet they still migrate or breed during it..

It is possible - but the question is still whether the effect is direct or indirect.

Organisms living in the deep oceans, even though they may not be able see the moon, might feel changes in the weight of water above them, or may detect changes in nutrients brought about by the flow of water with the tides.
 

Offline Mebyon

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« Reply #4 on: 20/07/2007 09:56:54 »
There is a theory known as the aquatic ape theory that suggests that humans, as they diverged from other apes, spent some of their time living on the shoreline, half in the sea, half on land (rather like seals).  The theory is not mainstream, but it does exist.
This theory is based for a large part on the hair growth patterns found on human (male) bodies. 
I understand that humans differ strongly from other apes not only in density of hair (an adaptation that may have arisen at a different time) but also in the general direction of the hairs.
If you look at the back of a particularly hirsute (spelling?) man you can almost see the streamline patterns formed.  Attempts to refute this often claim the patterns are beneficial for cooling and/or sweat release also the function of hair as a sexual display: pubic/underarm hair and also male chest hair.
I seem to remember hearing that someone claimed there was also some evidence that our teeth could have been adapted to a fish / shellfish diet.

After all life came from the sea and many species later returned to it to a greater or lesser extent (think Hippos and manatees or seals and blue whales!)

mmm, food for thought

 

another_someone

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« Reply #5 on: 20/07/2007 14:48:19 »
There is a theory known as the aquatic ape theory that suggests that humans, as they diverged from other apes, spent some of their time living on the shoreline, half in the sea, half on land (rather like seals).  The theory is not mainstream, but it does exist.
This theory is based for a large part on the hair growth patterns found on human (male) bodies. 
I understand that humans differ strongly from other apes not only in density of hair (an adaptation that may have arisen at a different time) but also in the general direction of the hairs.

Not only the direction of hair growth (as well as being suggested as a reason why we have relatively little body hair), but also the layer of fat on the skin of a newborn baby, and even a suggestion for a purpose for female breasts (to allow the nipples to float above water for easier feeding of the baby when half immersed).

It has even been suggested as a reason for bipedalism.

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=4623.msg38460#msg38460

And the fact that humans are one of the few apes that are happy to swim, and I am not sure how common the diving reflex (instinctively holding your breath, and slowing down your metabolism, when your face is held underwater).

It should also be noted that many women find giving birth in a birthing pool (i.e. in water) to be easier.

Even the way humans more commonly face each other during sexual intercourse is argued by some to have aquatic origins.

It is a very nice theory, but unfortunately a little short of hard archaeological evidence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquatic_ape_hypothesis
 

Offline skeptic

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Maybe it is true....maybe not
« Reply #6 on: 20/05/2008 02:46:46 »
I heard that the gravitational pull of the moon affects the ocean tides. That is a fact. (on a full moon i think the tides are highest)..
anyways...the doubtfull part is that i also heard that if the gravitational pull of a moon affects water, it affects fish behavior, and also ...it affects the mood of humans (some statistics have shown that suicide rates are highest during full moon nights or something like that)

There would be good reason for most life to be affected by the cycles of the moon.

Aside from that, the tides effect weather (the pull of the Moon will have direct effects upon the weather as well), and weather itself will effect mood, as well as what one is able to do outdoors.

I doubt that humans are directly sensitive to the pull of the Moon (although maybe someone will show otherwise), but I have no doubt that humans are acutely sensitive to the secondary effects of the Moon upon the Earth.

We've all heard of lunaticks, mentioned in the book of Matthew 4:24 and 17:15. The word comes from the ancient belief that the phases of the moon do have a direct effect on some people more than others. I used to scoff, till I read the second of those two verses, about a man who brought his son for healing, and I realized I am a lunatick.
The man described his son as "a lunatick and sore vexed". To some, that simply meant that he was insane.But,when the man told Jesus how his son "falleth into the fire and oft into the water", it became obvious he was referring to 'Falling Syndrome', an older name for Epilepsy, which I have had since early childhood.
After making this connection, I looked through my old calendars, where I recorded my seizure episodes. Every one was within days of a Full Moon. I know many will be skeptical about this, as I was, but it's absolute truth. I don't even pay attention to the moon phases, until I have an episode. But in 42 years I've never found it to be wrong.
The ancients believed in the Moon's effect on people, they had a name for it, and they even considered it healable. That belief has stood the test of time. If only modern medicine would stop scoffing and start focusing on how to minimize the effect of the moon on a human brain, they might find a REAL cure for Epilepsy, Stroke, and other brain disorders.(Any Takers?)
Here's a little food for thought: The moon was full when Ted Kennedy suffered his recent stroke. 
« Last Edit: 12/09/2008 20:36:11 by skeptic »
 

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