The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Human Chemical Composition  (Read 4296 times)

Heronumber0

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« on: 14/07/2007 12:07:29 »
Just a though here. All the materials below cost about 5, so where does the value of human life actually lie?

Oxygen (65.0%)
Carbon (18.5%)
Hydogen (9.5%)
Nitrogen (3.2%)
Calcium (1.5%)
Phosphorus 1.0%)
Potassium (0.4%)
Sulfur (0.3%)
Sodium (0.2%
Chlorine (0.2%)
Magnesium (0.1%)
Iodine (0.1%)
Iron (0.1%)
Chromium (trace)
Cobalt (trace)
Copper (trace)
Fluorine (trace)
Manganese (trace)
Molybdenum (trace)
Selenium (trace)
Tin (trace)
Vanadium (trace)
Zinc (trace)

All these materials are not typical of a unique life form.  So does our unique nature lie in a soul and is it possible that the soul has a mass of some sort? Just a thought...
« Last Edit: 14/07/2007 20:01:26 by Heronumber0 »


 

another_someone

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #1 on: 14/07/2007 12:58:24 »
One of the more expensive materials on Earth are diamonds, yet diamonds are just carbon, which in other forms can be the cheapest of materials.

You don't value a painting by the cost of the paint - it is how it is put together that gives it the value.
 

Heronumber0

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #2 on: 14/07/2007 13:11:51 »
You are right, but I was pointing out that human beings ascribe value to themselves and this is not reflected in the chemical composition of their bodies.  Status and all the other elusive things that humans chase have no intrinsic value when you reduce us down to mere chemicals.
 

another_someone

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #3 on: 14/07/2007 14:47:40 »
You are right, but I was pointing out that human beings ascribe value to themselves and this is not reflected in the chemical composition of their bodies.  Status and all the other elusive things that humans chase have no intrinsic value when you reduce us down to mere chemicals.

As you say, the component parts of a human being are fairly worthless, like a pile of bricks after a house has been knocked down - they do not represent the value of the house.

But, also as you indicate, value is subjective - humans value humans, but in the grand scheme of the whole universe, humans are but a small insect scurrying about on the surface of an insignificant lump of rock in a vast universe.
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8659
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #4 on: 14/07/2007 19:38:37 »
What, no calcium?
The composition of a person is just about the same just after they die but the value certainly changes.
 

Heronumber0

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #5 on: 14/07/2007 20:02:27 »
Sorry about that BC. Just edited it now.  Why does the value change afterwards?
 

another_someone

  • Guest
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #6 on: 14/07/2007 21:33:39 »
Sorry about that BC. Just edited it now.  Why does the value change afterwards?

I think what BC means is that after death a person ceases to be a fully functioning human being, can no longer actively partake in relationships with other human beings, and can no longer be a functional component of a human society.  Thus, as value is a statement of the relationship something or someone has to another, the inability to actively function within a human relationship will inevitably devalue the function that human being can retain in the life of another.
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8659
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #7 on: 15/07/2007 14:19:41 »
Sorry, I didn't think it needed explaining. A person is more useful, and hence more valuable when they are alive. Certainly, society is prepared to put a lot of effort into keeping people alive so it must value the living more than the dead.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Human Chemical Composition
« Reply #7 on: 15/07/2007 14:19:41 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums