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Author Topic: Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero ?  (Read 12601 times)

Offline Paulley

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Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero ?
« Reply #25 on: 02/03/2009 03:03:37 »
Well, here's what i think.
Temperature is the average kinetic motion of all the molecules and electrons.
Absolute zero is no motion.  Since it's believed that the speed of light is the limit of matter's speed, i think that "absolute not zero" would be when the average kinetic motion of the molecules were actually at the speed of light.  Anyway, the general theory of relativity says that if a molecule, atom or electron were going that fast, it would have so much mass that it would become a black whole anyway, so the real limit of temperature would be right before that happens, i guess.  Also, there's this other thing called the Planck temperature, which is pretty much the same as my hypothesis, but a little different.  You should look that up.  Anyway, i believe that there is a maximum temperature.
Jeez i better get back to my Spanish homework.  Anyone else here taking Spanish 3 (high school, not collge, spanish 3 college is probably insanium in the cranium) it's really hard.
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero ?
« Reply #26 on: 02/03/2009 03:08:43 »
The EXACT question has been asked before Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero?

Spanish homework? :)
Sorry, can't help you out.
 

Offline lightarrow

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Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero ?
« Reply #27 on: 02/03/2009 07:52:08 »
Well, here's what i think.
Temperature is the average kinetic motion of all the molecules and electrons.
Yes, however this holds true as long as a complete, quantum description is not needed.
Quote
Absolute zero is no motion.
That's not correct. Here comes the need of a quantum description. At 0 K there still is motion (otherwise, from the Heisenberg indetermination relation, the particles would be spread into all the universe).
 

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Is there an opposite to Absolute Zero ?
« Reply #27 on: 02/03/2009 07:52:08 »

 

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