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Author Topic: why have we not detected White holes  (Read 4075 times)

paul.fr

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why have we not detected White holes
« on: 31/07/2007 15:14:50 »
If black holes absorb all matter, and white holes eject matter. Why can we not find them? Surely all this "extra" matter coming from one point, must be noticeable.


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #1 on: 31/07/2007 15:18:03 »
They probably don't exist.
 

lyner

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #2 on: 01/08/2007 22:36:02 »
Why should they?
If matter is being introduced into the system - very probably - it is in the form of one little bit  a time,  in regions of very low density, I believe.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #3 on: 01/08/2007 23:53:50 »
Because they just don't make sense.  remember that the conservation of energy is one of the most fundamental laws that we have.  Stars work by initially converting gravitational energy into heat and then nuclear synthesis to generate more heat until they collapse nito various condensed structures like white dwarfs neutroon stars   maybe quark stars and eventually black holes.  there is no reason to expect there to be anything else the theory is self consistent and complete in this universe.  However inside the black hole things may well be different and a "big bang" event associated with a brief period of singularity inside the hole could well be considered to be a white hole.
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #4 on: 02/08/2007 06:32:19 »
If black holes were in fact "worm holes," it would make sense that the other side of a black hole would be a white hole...

But,

Wouldn't a white hole be seen from earth as just another star... spewing out light (and matter, I guess) in all directions??

« Last Edit: 02/08/2007 06:41:26 by Cut Chemist »
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #5 on: 02/08/2007 08:40:46 »
If black holes were in fact "worm holes," it would make sense that the other side of a black hole would be a white hole...

But,

Wouldn't a white hole be seen from earth as just another star... spewing out light (and matter, I guess) in all directions??



I'm probably wrong, but wouldn't their emissions be different? A star works by nuclear fusion, a white hole would just blurt out elementary particles.
 

Offline syhprum

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #6 on: 02/08/2007 09:19:30 »
Why should they?
If matter is being introduced into the system - very probably - it is in the form of one little bit  a time,  in regions of very low density, I believe.
This was the theory of continuous creation postulated by F Hoyle in the 1950's but was superceded by the 'Big Bang' theory
 

Offline Cut Chemist

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #7 on: 03/08/2007 06:46:10 »
Quote
I'm probably wrong, but wouldn't their emissions be different? A star works by nuclear fusion, a white hole would just blurt out elementary particles.

I'm not a physicist, but I was wondering how we would see elementary particles from space if they were not photons.  Obviously, light and matter are sucked into black holes but would we really be able to detect the matter coming out of a white hole, from light years away? 

Or possibly, (and probably more likely,) under the intense gravity of a black hole the matter being sucked in would be accelerated to the speed of light (through the worm hole) and hence transformed into light energy which would then be emitted from a white hole. (theoretically)

I guess one possibility would be that the spectrum of light from a star would be different from the spectrum of light emitted by a white hole.  If so how would it be different??  Or would we really know the difference??

Isn't the light spectrum emitted by an individual star a kind of fingerprint for that star, telling its age and life expectancy??
 
(Again, I'm only a chemist and not an astrophysicist and I don't completely understand the nature of stars and black holes)
« Last Edit: 03/08/2007 06:58:38 by Cut Chemist »
 

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why have we not detected White holes
« Reply #7 on: 03/08/2007 06:46:10 »

 

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