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Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #50 on: 08/08/2007 23:25:45 »
Now what's wrong with Office? LoL. Works good for me. Agagin :P. LoL.

You've obviously never used OpenOffice or Lotus Smartsuite.
 

another_someone

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« Reply #51 on: 08/08/2007 23:42:52 »
Lotus Smartsuite (which started life as Sumna Ami and Lotus 1-2-3, both products pre-dating Microsoft Word and Excel) used to be far better than the early Microsoft competition, but last time I looked at them, they were getting a bit long in the tooth.

OpenOffice is now my preferred office suite, although its major shortcoming from my perspective is lack of support for importing legacy documents from obsolete word processors.
 

Offline Simulated

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« Reply #52 on: 09/08/2007 01:17:43 »
Now what's wrong with Office? LoL. Works good for me. Agagin :P. LoL.

You've obviously never used OpenOffice or Lotus Smartsuite.

Can't say I have. Thanks for the info Another!
 

another_someone

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« Reply #53 on: 09/08/2007 01:30:08 »
We had another thread about OpenOffice vs MS Office:

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=8538.0
 

Offline Simulated

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« Reply #54 on: 09/08/2007 01:31:28 »
Thanks!! I'll have to check them out since I have just heard of them today.
 

Offline Simulated

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« Reply #55 on: 09/08/2007 01:32:10 »
Have to go Karen talk to you tomorrow.
 

Offline i am bored

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« Reply #56 on: 09/08/2007 01:41:31 »
toes and fingers
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #57 on: 09/08/2007 03:51:04 »
Where I was working a while back we had 3 different versions of Office. I created an Access database on 1 and found that none of the other PCs on the network could read it. I'd created it in Access 2000 and the other machines were running Office 2003 and Vista. I'd created it on the oldest system expecting the newer ones to be able to read it. Oh no, that's be too easy!

I had to import & convert the database into the others to be able to use it but then the original machine couldn't read it. No matter which version of Access I created a db with, the others couldn't use it without importing & converting it on each. As we all wanted to use & update the database on a regular basis, that was not a lot of good.

I asked the boss if I could install OpenOffice, he agreed, and the problem was solved. It could read all versions of the db without any problem.

I had a similar problem with a couple of Excel spreadsheets too & OpenOffice read them with no trouble.

That's the sort of thing I meant when I said different bits of MS Office don't talk to each other.

Actually, in the end I developed a php/MySQL (both open source) system for which my boss paid me quite handsomely  :P

And that's brings to mind another point; don't use MSsql or MS server II - they're useless. Use MySQL & either RedHat or Joomla for the server.
« Last Edit: 09/08/2007 03:57:48 by DoctorBeaver »
 

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« Reply #58 on: 09/08/2007 04:23:35 »
Now I'm confused.  Joomla is a content management software, not an OS, whereas RedHat is a particular flavour of Linux (not sure what you have against Debian/Ubuntu, or numerous other flavours of Linux).  How does Joomla nad RedHat become an 'or' rather than an 'and'?

MySQL is good (I use it a lot), but it has its weaknesses.  It is fast, but not 100% standards compliant, and lacking some functionality (although both of these factors keep getting addressed with each new version).  Postgres is more standards compliant, and has more extensive functionality.  MySQL has only started to support views in version 5.0.  Possibly with 5.0 it has caught up with much of what the standards demand (have not checked to see if there are still omissions or not - although the online manual suggests that stored procedures are still work in progress).
 

Offline kdlynn

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« Reply #59 on: 09/08/2007 04:33:59 »
you know charlie brown's mom's voice in the cartoon? that's how this all just sounded to me when i read it. lol
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #60 on: 09/08/2007 11:33:20 »
you know charlie brown's mom's voice in the cartoon? that's how this all just sounded to me when i read it. lol

I know exactly what you mean!
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #61 on: 09/08/2007 11:57:17 »
Crocodiles, alligators, caimans

Mushrooms/toadstools
There is actually no scientific difference between these two. There is perhaps an intuitive answer that states that toadstools are poisonous and mushrooms are edible, but I think that this is ill-defined. It may come from the fact that in German, the word for death is "tod" which sounds like "toad", and of course there is a fairy-tale unification between toads and where they sit. But the terms it would appear can be used synonymously, though mycologists (those who study fungi) seem to only use mushroom.
Mushrooms are actually only the fruiting body, or flower of the fungus. If you look in the soil, you can often see black or white threads in a mat. These are the "body" of the fungus and can cover many tens of square metres. In fact they form the largest single living organisms known, with areas of many hectares being covered by the roots of a single fungus. These roots are called hyphae, and the whole network is called mycelium, hence a mycologist.


Moths/butterflies

bears/koalas/pandas

monkeys /gorillas/apes

Gas planets and terrestrial planets

cats/lions/tigers

Ligers and tigons
Both ligers and tigons are tiger/lion crosses, but liger has a lion for a father, and tiger for a mother, while a tigon is the converse.

Doves and pigeons

Chameleons and Iguanas

Horses & donkeys, mules, asses

Indian and African elephants.

Wolves, foxes, dogs, hyenas, coyotes, jackals

Dolphins and porpoises

weasels, ferrets, stoats and mink

Rhinos and hippos

Rabbits & hares
Rabbits and hares both stem from the same Order and Family of mammals (Lagamorpha, Leporidae). Hares are generally larger than rabbits though of course there are exceptions. There are rather few key differences between the two species, but are as follows:
Rabbits give birth to their young in the burrow. Hares give birth above ground.
The young born to hares (leverets) are furry and are able to see. Rabbit young are born blind and hairless. This is the adaptation in response to their respective birthing sites. Hares generally live as individuals, rather than the groups in which rabbits live. A group of burrows forming a “village” is called a warren. Rabbits have been bred for food and for domestication. Hares are also used as a food source, though have not been domesticated. Rabbits can be a pain in the neck – ask an Australian! Rabbits introduced to new areas such as Australia can experience a population explosion in the absence of natural enemies, and overwhelm an ecosystem. This was combated by both human and biological controls, such as shooting and myxomatosis or latterly calicivirus.

Astronomy & astrology

Whiskey & whisky

Centipedes & millipedes

Physiologist, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, psychic.
« Last Edit: 09/08/2007 11:59:04 by dentstudent »
 

Offline Simulated

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« Reply #62 on: 09/08/2007 13:41:02 »
Where I was working a while back we had 3 different versions of Office. I created an Access database on 1 and found that none of the other PCs on the network could read it. I'd created it in Access 2000 and the other machines were running Office 2003 and Vista. I'd created it on the oldest system expecting the newer ones to be able to read it. Oh no, that's be too easy!

I had to import & convert the database into the others to be able to use it but then the original machine couldn't read it. No matter which version of Access I created a db with, the others couldn't use it without importing & converting it on each. As we all wanted to use & update the database on a regular basis, that was not a lot of good.

I asked the boss if I could install OpenOffice, he agreed, and the problem was solved. It could read all versions of the db without any problem.

I had a similar problem with a couple of Excel spreadsheets too & OpenOffice read them with no trouble.

That's the sort of thing I meant when I said different bits of MS Office don't talk to each other.

Actually, in the end I developed a php/MySQL (both open source) system for which my boss paid me quite handsomely  :P

And that's brings to mind another point; don't use MSsql or MS server II - they're useless. Use MySQL & either RedHat or Joomla for the server.

OK Doc I'm good now. LoL.

And Whoever got the information on Rabbits and Hares Thanks!!!!!
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #63 on: 09/08/2007 14:00:03 »
And Whoever got the information on Rabbits and Hares Thanks!!!!!

You're welcome!
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #64 on: 09/08/2007 17:28:24 »
Good Job!
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #65 on: 10/08/2007 17:53:23 »
George - Joomla itself is indeed a CMS but I was referring to JSAS (Joomla Stand-Alone Server). I was remiss in not making that clear. Xampp is another good 1.
 

paul.fr

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« Reply #66 on: 12/08/2007 11:38:50 »
In fact they form the largest single living organisms known, with areas of many hectares being covered by the roots of a single fungus. These roots are called hyphae, and the whole network is called mycelium, hence a mycologist.

I did mean to reply to this earlier. Time, if only there was more.

Quote

Humungous fungus: world's largest organism?
 Thursday, 10 April 2003
 

 
Armillaria fungus mushrooms: could this be the largest single organism on Earth (Pic: USDA)
 
The discovery of the world's largest fungus - up to 8,500 years old and carperting nearly 10 square kilometres of forest floor - has raised questions about what constitutes an individual organism.

A study of a tree-killing fungus in rugged northeast Oregon, USA, found that a single individual covered an area equivalent to about 1,600 football fields, according to a report in the current issue of the Canadian Journal of Forest Research.

"The fact that an organism like this has been growing in the forest for thousands of years really expands our view of the forest ecosystem and how it works," said Dr Catherine Parks, a pathologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture who led the study. "From a broad scientific view, it challenges what we think of as an individual organism."

The fungus is the most outstanding known individual of the Armillaria ostoyae species, which grows in high-latitude northern hemisphere forests and causes large production losses due to root disease. It lives in the soil and spreads mainly along tree roots by shoestring-like threads called rhizomorphs. Apart from dead and dying trees, its only surface evidence are its fruiting bodies, known commonly as honey mushrooms.

The researchers discovered the giant fungus in the Malheur National Forest, some 590,000 hectares of rugged high-desert grasslands, pine forests and alpine lakes. Elevations range from 1,200 to 2,750 metres, the highest point being the Strawberry Mountain range that passes from east to west and through the forest.
A section of the Malheur forest affected by the fungus (Pic: USDA)
 

The single organism discovered has yielded new insights into a fungus' role in forest ecology. It had been thought that Armillaria fungi grew in distinct clusters within forests, visible from the air by ring-shaped patches of dead trees.

But when the researchers collected samples of fungus from 9.65 square km of discontinuous dead patches in the Oregon forest and grew them together in laboratory Petri dishes, they did not react to each other as they would to alien individuals.

"The technique is actually very simple and makes use of this fungus's own ability to distinguish one individual from another," Parks said.

The results confirmed the identical genetic make-up of all the samples. The researchers were surprised that such well-separated clusters of fungus represented the spread of a single individual. They estimated its age at somewhere between 2,000 and 8,500 years.

"It's one organism that began as a microscopic spore and then grew vegetatively, like a plant," she said. "If you could take away the soil and look at it, it's just one big heap of fungus with all of these filaments that go out under the surface."

Forest managers had thought that the deliberate suppression of wildfires worsened the spread of the fungus: "But because this fungus is thousands of years old, and grew long before fire systems were influenced by man, this isn't the case. It also means that fire does not naturally control this disease."

The researchers now believe the fungus is part of the natural cycle of renewal and decline within forests and that it is often present in areas with little obvious tree damage.

Forest managers may be more cautious about using selective tree-cutting aimed at controlling fungal spread: "After you cut an infected tree, the entire root system can be colonised by the fungus, which then increases the disease potential around that area."

Planting species less susceptible to the fungus - such as western larch, western white pine and ponderosa pine - and harvesting susceptible individuals during thinning would reduce the fungus's impact on forest yields, she said.


http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/enviro/EnviroRepublish_828525.htm
 

Offline dentstudent

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« Reply #67 on: 10/02/2009 08:26:15 »
Since Karen asked about frogs and toads, I though that we could resurrect this thread.....and perhaps add some answers?
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #68 on: 10/02/2009 08:27:57 »
Good idea.. what's the differences?
 

Offline RD

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« Reply #69 on: 10/02/2009 19:33:23 »
The difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist is about 100 an hour  :)
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #70 on: 11/02/2009 00:13:08 »
LOL..LOL..That's very good!
 

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« Reply #70 on: 11/02/2009 00:13:08 »

 

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