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Author Topic: Carbon Monoxide detectors.  (Read 4604 times)

paul.fr

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« on: 11/08/2007 18:43:13 »
Should they be affixed high or low? I seem to remember Kat saying low, but on the box it says high!

I am now confused.


 

Offline lightarrow

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #1 on: 11/08/2007 19:17:59 »
Should they be affixed high or low? I seem to remember Kat saying low, but on the box it says high!

I am now confused.
I don't know them specifically, but of course it depends on the values of CO measured when is low and when is high and it depends on what you want: a too low value means that the detector could ring very often, maybe without a real risk, a too high value means it won't ring until the CO concentration is very high, so, only when you have already inspired significant amounts of it. You should know for exactly which value of CO concentration you are absolutely sure you are safe and put the detector at that value or lower. If then it rings too frequently, there is something wrong about CO production, or the detector is too low. It all depends on the numerical values.
« Last Edit: 11/08/2007 19:22:31 by lightarrow »
 

paul.fr

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #2 on: 11/08/2007 20:35:54 »
The problem (in my head) is that, if i remember correctly, Carbon Monoxide has the same density as air.

The detector, is actually in my sisters house and i know for sure that she will not try it in various places and positions. If i am right about the density, then this just confounds my thinking of where it should go.
 

Offline chris

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #3 on: 11/08/2007 21:14:37 »
The key with carbon monoxide detectors is to put them near to potential sources of CO. This is not the case with smoke detectors as this might lead to false triggering by innocuous sources (such as burning the toast). But CO is always considered a danger and therefore placing the detector close to potential sources will provide the earliest warning that there is a problem. You obviously have to balance this with placing the detector where it will be heard at night when people are sleeping.

Chris
 

paul.fr

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #4 on: 11/08/2007 21:42:59 »
Ahh. Many thanks, Chris and Alberto.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #5 on: 12/08/2007 14:54:09 »
CO is slightly less dense than air (about 28/29) but that's not enough to make any real difference. Much more significant is that CO is practically always produced by combustion so it's usually hotter than the air and therefore it rises.
 

Offline iko

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #6 on: 19/08/2007 20:41:01 »


Carbon monoxide poisoning
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that is created whenever a flame is present. Some homes have been found to have concentrations of this gas that are above the federal health standard set under the Clean Air Act.

Major Sources
Carbon monoxide is emitted by any combustion source including burning charcoal, gasoline engines running in attached garages or sheds, un-vented kerosene heaters and tobacco smoke.

Health Effects
Carbon monoxide interferes with your body's ability to use oxygen. Depending on the amount you inhale, it can affect your balance, harm your heart, make you tired and cause headaches, confusion, nausea, and dizziness. Very high levels can cause death.

from:   http://www.tpchd.org/page.php?id=60






I think there is not much difference at which level you put your detector:
most of all it should be reliable and periodically checked.

ikod

« Last Edit: 19/08/2007 20:47:31 by iko »
 

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Carbon Monoxide detectors.
« Reply #6 on: 19/08/2007 20:41:01 »

 

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