The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Science Photo of the Week  (Read 467575 times)

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
In the Shadow of Saturn



Image Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA


BIGGY PICCY HERE

 In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn drifted in giant planet's shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight, in this exaggerated color image. Saturn's rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the image. Seen in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn's E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Great Orion Nebulae







Image Credit & Copyright: Jesús Vargas (Astrogades) & Maritxu Poyal (Maritxu)

BIGGY PICCY HERE

 The Great Nebula in Orion, also known as M42, is one of the most famous nebulas in the sky. The star forming region's glowing gas clouds and hot young stars are on the right in this sharp and colorful image that includes the smaller nebula M43 near center and dusty, bluish reflection nebulae NGC 1977 and friends on the left. Located at the edge of an otherwise invisible giant molecular cloud complex, these eye-catching nebulae represent only a small fraction of this galactic neighborhood's wealth of interstellar material. Within the well-studied stellar nursery, astronomers have also identified what appear to be numerous infant planetary systems. The gorgeous skyscape spans nearly two degrees or about 45 light-years at the Orion Nebula's estimated distance of 1,500 light-years.
 

Offline harleywilliams

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
This is really very nice forum to know lot's of information and also to learn...............
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Undulatus Asperatus Clouds



Photographer: Luis Argerich;
Summary Author: Luis Argerich; Jim Foster




The photo above shows unusual looking clouds looming over a lagoon near Lobos, Argentina. This formation appeared, oddly enough, following a morning storm. The clouds are referred to as undulatus asperatus, a recently introduced cloud designation (2009). These roughened wave clouds may be related to a type of altostratus cloud -- altostratus undulatus. It seems that Undulatus asperatus have a predisposition to form before midday, over relatively flat terrain and after convective storms have passed by. Though these intriguing clouds made the sky look especially threatening, no precipitation or strong winds ensued. They persisted for several hours before finally dissipating.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Cloudy Night of the Northern Lights



Image Credit & Copyright: Fredrick Broms (Northern Lights Photography)

BIGGY PICCY HERE



 On September 26, a large solar coronal mass ejection smacked into planet Earth's magnetosphere producing a severe geomagnetic storm and wide spread auroras. Captured here near local midnight from Kvaløya island outside Tromsø in northern Norway, the intense auroral glow was framed by parting rain clouds. Tinted orange, the clouds are also in silhouette as the tops of the colorful shimmering curtains of northern lights extend well over 100 kilometers above the ground. Though the auroral rays are parallel, perspective makes them appear to radiate from a vanishing point at the zenith. Near the bottom of the scene, an even more distant Pleiades star cluster and bright planet Jupiter shine on this cloudy northern night.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula





Image Credit & Copyright: Larry Van Vleet


It's the bubble versus the cloud. NGC 7635, the Bubble Nebula, is being pushed out by the stellar wind of massive central star BD+602522. Next door, though, lives a giant molecular cloud, visible to the right. At this place in space, an irresistible force meets an immovable object in an interesting way. The cloud is able to contain the expansion of the bubble gas, but gets blasted by the hot radiation from the bubble's central star. The radiation heats up dense regions of the molecular cloud causing it to glow. The Bubble Nebula, pictured above in scientifically mapped colors to bring up contrast, is about 10 light-years across and part of a much larger complex of stars and shells. The Bubble Nebula can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Queen of Aethiopia (Cassiopeia)
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Jupiter's Clouds from New Horizons



Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins U. APL, SWRI






The New Horizons spacecraft took some stunning images of Jupiter on its way out to Pluto. Famous for its Great Red Spot, Jupiter is also known for its regular, equatorial cloud bands, visible through even modest sized telescopes. The above image, horizontally compressed, was taken in 2007 near Jupiter's terminator and shows the Jovian giant's wide diversity of cloud patterns. On the far left are clouds closest to Jupiter's South Pole. Here turbulent whirlpools and swirls are seen in a dark region, dubbed a belt, that rings the planet. Even light colored regions, called zones, show tremendous structure, complete with complex wave patterns. The energy that drives these waves surely comes from below. New Horizons is the fastest space probe ever launched, has now passed the orbits of Saturn and Uranus and is on track to reach Pluto in 2015.
 

Offline ajimmyadams

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
i like these kind of information because i am i science student i love the NASA researches!
thanks to all keep sharing!

spam deleted
« Last Edit: 24/10/2011 17:02:44 by imatfaal »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Scalloped Blue Ice





Photographer: John Adam; John’s Web site
Summary Author: John Adam




The photo above shows a chunk of scalloped ice, about 65 ft (20 m) in width that broke off from the Sawyer Glacier near Tracy Arm Fjord in southeastern Alaska. Note the pure blue color emanating from within the “chasm.”  The mechanism responsible for producing this robin’s egg blue color, as well as the blue color in deep snow, is essentially the same as that giving deep water its blue color. The longer wavelengths (yellow and red light) present in the incident white sunlight are preferentially absorbed by ice crystals. As a result, what we see is what’s not absorbed -- reflected light that’s dominated by the green and blue portion of the spectrum. In general, the thicker the ice the greater the absorption, and thus the bluer the color. Though this color may look sky blue, Raleigh scattering causes the colors we see in the sky on a clear day, not absorption and reflection by air molecules.

The melting patterns on this medium sized iceberg look as if someone has scooped out the ice with a scallop shell. So-called "spontaneous pattern formation" is ubiquitous in nature. The particular mechanism inducing these undulations may involve local melting of parts of the surface, which grow locally as a result of a feedback mechanism. For example, perhaps there’s an initially small and shallow depression that creates a region of shadow, outside of which more melting occurs, changing the shadow boundary, and so on. Photo taken in June 2011.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Orange Sun Scintillating



Image Credit & Copyright: Alan Friedman (Averted Imagination)

Nice biggy piccy HERE


 Our Sun is becoming a busy place. Taken just last week, the Sun was captured sporting numerous interesting features including one of the larger sunspot groups yet recorded: AR 1339 visible on the image right. Only last year, the Sun was emerging from an unusually quiet Solar Minimum that lasted for years. The above image was recorded in a single color of light called Hydrogen Alpha, inverted, and false colored. Spicules cover much of the Sun's face. The gradual brightening towards the Sun's edges is caused by increased absorption of relatively cool solar gas and called limb darkening. Just over the Sun's edges, several scintillating prominences protrude, while prominences on the Sun's face are seen as light streaks. Possibly the most visually interesting of all are the magnetically tangled active regions containing cool sunspots. As our Sun's magnetic field winds toward Solar Maximum over the next few years, increased activity will likely create times when the Sun's face is even more complex.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Update of Jupiter's Europa: Massive Lake Verified Beneath Ice-Shrouded Surface




Holding My Breath I Just Took This Above Real Bona-Fide Genuine Photo !  (see the effort I put in to serve ewe ?..and there wasn't even any motorway services on the way !!)

Data from a NASA planetary mission have provided scientists evidence of what appears to be a body of liquid water, equal in volume to the North American Great Lakes, beneath the icy surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa.

The data suggest there is significant exchange between Europa's icy shell and the ocean beneath. This information could bolster arguments that Europa's global subsurface ocean represents a potential habitat for life elsewhere in our solar system. The findings are published in the scientific journal Nature.

SOURCE: The Daily Galaxy
Other Sources: Tomato, mustard, sweet and sour and chilli
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #611 on: 23/01/2012 00:55:48 »
Europe's Orbiting Observatories Capture Stunning New Images of the "Pillars of Creation"




Nice super biggy piccy HERE

     

 

Two of the European Space Agency's (ESA) orbiting observatories have captured new and spectacular views of the gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula (M16) that were the subject of the iconic 1995 Hubble images dubbed "Pillars of Creation."

In 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope's 'Pillars of Creation' image of the Eagle Nebula became one of the most iconic images of the 20th century. Now, two of ESA's orbiting observatories --Stunning new Herschel and XMM-Newton-- have revealed new insights this enigmatic star-forming region.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #612 on: 23/01/2012 21:37:29 »
Sirius Twinkling



Photographer: David Lynch
Summary Author: David Lynch


Twinkling is the rapid fluctuation in brightness and color of a star. It’s caused by slight changes in density of air pockets called “seeing cells” that move across the observer’s line of sight. Air’s refractive index is determined, in part, by its density. Such undulations cause slight, momentary defocusing of the starlight resulting in brightness changes, also called scintillation. In extreme cases, the star’s position hops around. Twinkling also produces rapid color changes because air is slightly dispersive, i.e. the index of refraction varies slightly with wavelength.

Both brightness and color twinkling are shown here in a five-second exposure of Sirius using a telephoto lens that was wiggled slightly during the exposure. As the star‘s twinkling image skated around the focal plane, it traced out graceful, colorful arcs, fading in some places, brightening in others.

Here scintillation and telescope jitter, the bane of astronomers everywhere, have been recast into a stunningly beautiful image. Image taken on January 4, 2012.
 

Offline mike321

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #613 on: 29/01/2012 09:14:26 »
This is the pic of a spider trying to climb up a wall.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #614 on: 16/02/2012 17:56:13 »
SPLIT SUNSET





Photographer: Jim Grant
Summary Author: Dave Lynch; Jim Grant; Jim Foster


BIGGY PICCY HERE


This “split screen” sunset was snapped at Ponto Beach near Carlsbad in southern California on January 24, 2012. The scarlet-colored cirrus clouds on the right half of the photo could, under some circumstances, result from the fact that they're higher in the sky and are thus still picking up some of the Sun’s lingering rays. However, all the clouds look pretty much the same altitude here. It seems the only difference is that half the picture is conspicuously redder than the other half, but what could cause this? The reason has to do with shadowing. As illustrated in the diagram to the left, direct sunlight (reddened by increased path length) shines on some of the clouds but the shadow of the large cloud (white oval) prevents direct sunlight from reaching other clouds. Only blue skylight reaches the smaller clouds within the shadow, so they appear somewhat blue or gray. In essence, the bigger cloud casts a very large, dark crepuscular ray. Keep your eyes peeled to the sky – you never know what you might see.


 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #615 on: 16/02/2012 19:41:20 »
"Residents of Tainan learned a lesson in whale biology after the decomposing remains of a 60-ton sperm whale exploded on a busy street, showering nearby cars and shops with blood and organs and stopping traffic for hours."

Source : MSNBC



Links : Naked Scientists Radio Show coverage of this story 1st February 2004 http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/news/news/523/

It reminds me a bit of this, that I bumped into a few days ago.


Where Oregon Highway officials got a reminder of Whale Physics.

Perhaps the officials in Tainan and Oregon should get together and compare notes.
« Last Edit: 30/11/2013 20:18:13 by CliffordK »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #616 on: 22/02/2012 10:23:39 »
A Sailing Stone in Death Valley






Image Credit: Nathan Alexander, Wikipedia
 How did this big rock end up on this strange terrain? One of the more unusual places here on Earth occurs inside Death Valley, California, USA. There a dried lakebed named Racetrack Playa exists that is almost perfectly flat, with the odd exception of some very large stones, one of which is pictured above. Now the flatness and texture of large playa like Racetrack are fascinating but not scientifically puzzling -- they are caused by mud flowing, drying, and cracking after a heavy rain. Only recently, however, has a viable scientific hypothesis been given to explain how 300-kilogram sailing stones ended up near the middle of such a large flat surface. Unfortunately, as frequently happens in science, a seemingly surreal problem ends up having a relatively mundane solution. It turns out that high winds after a rain can push even heavy rocks across a temporarily slick lakebed.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #617 on: 22/02/2012 10:25:03 »
Anticrepuscular Rays Over Wyoming



Image Credit & Copyright: Nate Cassell


 What's happening over the horizon? Although the scene may appear somehow supernatural, nothing more unusual is occurring than a setting Sun and some well placed clouds. Pictured above are anticrepuscular rays. To understand them, start by picturing common crepuscular rays that are seen any time that sunlight pours though scattered clouds. Now although sunlight indeed travels along straight lines, the projections of these lines onto the spherical sky are great circles. Therefore, the crepuscular rays from a setting (or rising) sun will appear to re-converge on the other side of the sky. At the anti-solar point 180 degrees around from the Sun, they are referred to as anticrepuscular rays. Pictured above is a particularly striking set of anticrepuscular rays photographed last month near Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA.
 

Offline imatfaal

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2787
  • rouge moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #618 on: 23/02/2012 13:14:23 »
Nice picture Neil - Naked Astronomy dealt with crepuscular rays and their weird opposites a few podcasts ago
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #619 on: 23/02/2012 18:10:53 »
Nice picture Neil - Naked Astronomy dealt with crepuscular rays and their weird opposites a few podcasts ago

Thanks chum !......I must catch up with the podcasts....
 

Offline SeanB

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1118
  • Thanked: 3 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #620 on: 23/02/2012 19:24:10 »
Saw some lovely crepuscular rays this morning, on the way to work. Sunlight breaking through the heavy early morning cloud, before the wind came up and blew them away, only to be replaced with heavy rain now in the evening.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #621 on: 25/02/2012 05:16:29 »
Saw some lovely crepuscular rays this morning, on the way to work. Sunlight breaking through the heavy early morning cloud, before the wind came up and blew them away, only to be replaced with heavy rain now in the evening.

Shame ya couldn't snap a piccy !...

Lightning Display on Ikaria Island, Greece





Photographer: Chris Kotsiopoulos
Summary Author: Chris Kotsiopoulos


This 70-shot photo sequence shows a lightning display that occurred during a severe thunderstorm last summer on the island of Ikaria, Greece, near the southwestern coast of Turkey. The stormy weather actually developed during a photo session of the total lunar eclipse on June 15, 2011  To make this shot, the camera was set on a tripod taking 20-second exposures continuously. More than 100 lightning bolts were captured in this sequence, the majority of which were potent cloud-to-ground strikes.



 

Offline SeanB

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1118
  • Thanked: 3 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #622 on: 25/02/2012 19:35:34 »
Sheepy, I was in moving traffic, and the camera was at work, with flat batteries.
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #623 on: 25/02/2012 23:37:59 »
Lightning Display on Ikaria Island, Greece

Is that Zeus taking revenge on the Greek Bankers and Politicians for mortgaging the Parthenon?
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #624 on: 26/02/2012 05:16:37 »
Sheepy, I was in moving traffic, and the camera was at work, with flat batteries.

This is why I keep an emergency easel , canvas and paints in the boot ! I'm sure the traffic behind ewe would have been happy to allow ewe the couple of hours to set up and paint away !  ;)
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #624 on: 26/02/2012 05:16:37 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums