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Author Topic: Science Photo of the Week  (Read 468613 times)

Offline SciencyGummyWorms

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #700 on: 19/05/2015 16:51:18 »
This is a artist rendering of a black hole ripping a star apart.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #701 on: 30/07/2015 19:50:02 »
Milky Way over Uluru




Image Credit & Copyright: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN)
Explanation: The central regions of our Milky Way Galaxy rise above Uluru/Ayers Rock in this striking night skyscape. Recorded on July 13, a faint airglow along the horizon shows off central Australia's most recognizable landform in silhouette. Of course the Milky Way's own cosmic dust clouds appear in silhouette too, dark rifts along the galaxy's faint congeries of stars. Above the central bulge, rivers of cosmic dust converge on a bright yellowish supergiant star Antares. Left of Antares, wandering Saturn shines in the night.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #702 on: 21/02/2016 16:13:48 »
Dent De Morcles



Provided by: GLOBE at Night
Summary authors & editors: Jim Foster


Parts of many of the world's mountain belts contain twisted outcrops of rocks that display beautiful patterns of folding and other geologic distortions. Making sense of these formations has been a challenge to geologists for more than 100 years. The photo above shows an example of the complex processes that often take place during mountain building. It was taken in the Pennine Alps of southwestern Switzerland and shows a portion of a geological formation known as the Dent de Morcles. The Morcles is a classic alpine nappe structure. A nappe is a large plate of rocks moved from its place of origin by faulting or folding - in this case folding is the mechanism. The rocks (mostly limestone) in the recumbent folds of the Dent de Morcles have been turned nearly up side down. These rocks date from the Mesozoic Era (65-245 million years ago).
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #703 on: 18/09/2016 19:42:21 »
A Slice Through Time




The striking contrast between the light buff colored Coconino Sandstone and the muddy red Hermit Shale is cause for this portrait of rock wall along the Bright Angel trail in the Grand Canyon. The easily eroded shale was deposited as mud in flood plains and tidal flats, and owes its red color to iron oxides. Fossilized reptile tracks and plants are found in the shale. The mud flats dried and cracked as they were overrun by advancing sand dunes. The tilted bedding and uniform size and purity of the quartz grains of the Coconino formation indicates deposition as wind-blown sand. Some of that sand can be seen filling a deep crack in the underlying red shale (right center).


Provided by: Martin Ruzek, USRA
Summary authors & editors: Martin Ruzek
credit: http://epod.usra.edu/
 

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Re: Science Photo of the Week
« Reply #703 on: 18/09/2016 19:42:21 »

 

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