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Author Topic: Science Photo of the Week  (Read 294972 times)

neilep

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Around the World in 80 Telescopes
Illustration Credit & Copyright: ESO / 100 Hours of Astronomy





 Want to go on an extraordinary voyage? Today you can, by watching Around the World in 80 Telescopes. The 24-hour long webcast is organized by the European Southern Observatory for the International Year of Astronomy cornerstone project 100 Hours of Astronomy. As suggested in this astronomically intense composite, the webcast event follows night and day around the globe to visit some of the most advanced observatories on Earth and in space, exploring the universe in visible light and beyond. The Gemini North Telescope (Hawaii, USA) and the large observatories at the summit of volcanic Mauna Kea are scheduled for the first stops in the program beginning April 3 at 09:00 UT. Others on the schedule include the Swift Satellite and Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (Hanle, India), and the 10-meter South Pole Telescope and IceCube Neutrino Telescope (South Pole, Antarctica).


112inky

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oh all are fine

neilep

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A Solar Prominence from SOHO
Credit: SOHO-EIT Consortium, ESA, NASA



 How can gas float above the Sun? Twisted magnetic fields arching from the solar surface can trap ionized gas, suspending it in huge looping structures. These majestic plasma arches are seen as prominences above the solar limb. In 1999 September, this dramatic and detailed image was recorded by the EIT experiment on board the space-based SOHO observatory in the light emitted by ionized Helium. It shows hot plasma escaping into space as a fiery prominence breaks free from magnetic confinement a hundred thousand kilometers above the Sun. These awesome events bear watching as they can affect communications and power systems over 100 million kilometers away on Planet Earth. Recently, our Sun has been unusually quiet.

neilep

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Stars and Dust Across Corona Australis
Credit & Copyright: Andrey Oreshko






 Cosmic dust clouds sprawl across a rich field of stars in this sweeping telescopic vista near the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. Probably less than 500 light-years away and effectively blocking light from more distant, background stars in the Milky Way, the densest part of the dust cloud is about 8 light-years long. At its tip (upper right) is a group of lovely reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727, 6729, and IC 4812. A characteristic blue color is produced as light from hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The smaller yellowish nebula (NGC 6729) surrounds young variable star R Coronae Australis. Magnificent globular star cluster NGC 6723 is at the upper right corner of the view. While NGC 6723 appears to be part of the group, it actually lies nearly 30,000 light-years away, far beyond the Corona Australis dust clouds.

neilep

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The Milky Road
Credit & Copyright: Larry Landolfi




Inspired by the night skies of planet Earth in the International Year of Astronomy, photographer Larry Landolfi created this tantalizing fantasy view. The composited image suggests a luminous Milky Way is the heavenly extension of a country road. Of course, the name for our galaxy, the Milky Way (in Latin, Via Lactea), does refer to its appearance as a milky band or path in the sky. In fact, the word galaxy itself derives from the Greek for milk. Visible on moonless nights from dark sky areas, though not so bright or colorful as in this image, the glowing celestial band is due to the collective light of myriad stars along the plane of our galaxy, too faint to be distinguished individually. The diffuse starlight is cut by dark swaths of obscuring galactic dust clouds. Four hundred years ago, Galileo turned his telescope on the Milky Way and announced it to be "... a congeries of innumerable stars ..."

neilep

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Stars at the Galactic Center
Credit: Susan Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) et al., JPL-Caltech, NASA



Clicking HERE will take you to a massive piccy that is 30MB !!

The center of our Milky Way Galaxy is hidden from the prying eyes of optical telescopes by clouds of obscuring dust and gas. But in this stunning vista, the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared cameras, penetrate much of the dust revealing the stars of the crowded galactic center region. A mosaic of many smaller snapshots, the detailed, false-color image shows older, cool stars in bluish hues. Reddish glowing dust clouds are associated with young, hot stars in stellar nurseries. The very center of the Milky Way was only recently found capable of forming newborn stars. The galactic center lies some 26,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Sagittarius. At that distance, this picture spans about 900 light-years.


neilep

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Mount Rushmore's Starry Night
Credit & Copyright: Wally Pacholka (TWAN)







 This starry night sky sparkles above the Black Hills of South Dakota and the United States' Mount Rushmore National Park. The historic site features enormous sculptures of four US presidents; George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, carved into the southeast face of granite cliffs. Above the monumental symbols of the country's independence and early history, the night features stars and constellations familiar to northern skygazers around the world. Most noticeable are the stars of Ursa Major and the asterism known as the Big Dipper, almost resting upright along the cliff edge near picture center. Follow the arc of the Big Dipper's handle to get to Arcturus, the bright yellowish star in the lower left corner. Of course, a line extending through the dipper's two right most stars points to the upper right toward Polaris, planet Earth's North Star.

om

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Neutron Repulsion Powers

Stars at the Galactic Center
Credit: Susan Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) et al., JPL-Caltech, NASA



Clicking HERE will take you to a massive piccy that is 30MB !!

The center of our Milky Way Galaxy is hidden from the prying eyes of optical telescopes by clouds of obscuring dust and gas. But in this stunning vista, the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared cameras, penetrate much of the dust revealing the stars of the crowded galactic center region. A mosaic of many smaller snapshots, the detailed, false-color image shows older, cool stars in bluish hues. Reddish glowing dust clouds are associated with young, hot stars in stellar nurseries. The very center of the Milky Way was only recently found capable of forming newborn stars. The galactic center lies some 26,000 light-years away, toward the constellation Sagittarius. At that distance, this picture spans about 900 light-years.



In the following image,

LEFT: Data points are rest masses of 3,000 types of atoms that comprise the entire visible universe.

RIGHT: Intersections of empirical mass parabolas with front plane (Z/A =0) reveal repulsive interactions between neutrons.



CONCLUSION: When matter is compressed into small regions of space, then repulsive interactions between neutrons will energize each neutron by ~10-22 MeV.  This produces highly energized compact cosmic objects, like that at the core of the Sun, and it prevents their collapse to form the imaginary Black Holes. [Credit: The above image is Figure 3 of a paper, "On the cosmic nuclear cycle and the similarity of nuclei and stars," Journal of Fusion Energy 25 (2006) 107-114.]

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
http://myprofile.cos.com/manuelo09
or http://www.omatumr.com
 
 
« Last Edit: 16/07/2009 12:50:52 by om »

fuozzy69

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Amazing pictures.

neilep

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Amazing pictures.

Thank you..and welcome !!...please feel free to contribute too.

Thanks again for your kind comment.

om

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FIVE STUDENTS IN SPECIAL NUCLEAR TOPICS CLASS, CHEM 471

Amazing pictures.

Thank you for your kindness.

The amazing "Cradle of the Nuclides", shown below on the right, was developed with the help of five students in the last graduate class that I taught in the spring semester of 2000.



The five students were Cynthia Bolon, Shelonda Finch, Daniel Ragland, Matthew Seelke, and Bing Zhang, all at the University of Missouri-Rolla.

I was looking forward to retirement and did not want to teach the class that semester.  But the students asked me to teach it anyway.  I did but assigned no textbook. Instead we used only data from the well-known Chart of the Nuclides to see if we could find some unrecognized source of nuclear energy that might explain solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, and solar-wind Hydrogen pouring from the surface of the iron-rich Sun.

The picture is also shown as Figure 16 on page 16 of a more recent picture in AIP Conference Proceedings, volume 822 (2006) pages 206-225:
http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0510001

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
« Last Edit: 16/07/2009 12:53:29 by om »

neilep

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The Chameleon's Dark Nebulae
Credit & Copyright: Andrey Kuznetsov



Biggy Piccy Herey






 The Chameleon is a small constellation near the south celestial pole. Boasting no bright stars, it blends inconspicuously with the starry southern sky. But, taken in dark skies over Namibia, this image reveals a stunning aspect of the shy constellation -- a field of dusty nebulae and colorful stars. Blue reflection nebulae are scattered through the scene, but most eye-catching is the complex of silvery dust clouds that only faintly reflect starlight, punctuated by dense dark nebulae. The dark nebulae stand out because they block out background stars. This view of the cosmic dust clouds spans about 4 degrees on the sky.

neilep

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The Big Corona
Credit & Copyright: Koen van Gorp







Most photographs don't adequately portray the magnificence of the Sun's corona. Seeing the corona first-hand during a total solar eclipse is best. The human eye can adapt to see features and extent that photographic film usually cannot. Welcome, however, to the digital age. The above picture is a combination of thirty-three photographs that were digitally processed to highlight faint features of a total eclipse that occurred in March of 2006. The images of the Sun's corona were digitally altered to enhance dim, outlying waves and filaments. Shadow seekers need not fret, though, since as yet there is no way that digital image processing can mimic the fun involved in experiencing a total solar eclipse. Last week, a spectacular total solar eclipse occurred over southern Asia, while the The next total solar eclipse will be visible from the South Pacific on 2010 July 11.

om

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The Big Corona
Credit & Copyright: Koen van Gorp







Most photographs don't adequately portray the magnificence of the Sun's corona. . . .

Thanks for this beautiful and informative photo of the solar corona!

Even in these times of low solar activity - between the end of solar cycle #23 and the long awaited start of solar cycle #24 - the violent and erratic nature of material above the solar photosphere is obvious.

Earth glides through the Sun's next higher level of material - the heliosphere - in the annual journey around the Sun that produces our four seasons - Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter.

Earth is directly connected to the Sun, orbiting through this invisible sheath of solar wind particles and solar magnetic and electric fields that extends more that 100 AU above the normally invisible corona and the visible solar photosphere.

Earth and the Sun are mistakenly perceived as separate entities, in large part because visible light from the photosphere produces the illusion of a solar "surface" that separates Earth from the Sun.

Thank you, neilep, for posting an observation that will be of interest to taxpayers who were told that anthropologic CO2 (from fossil fuels) has a greater impact than the Sun on global climate change.

My favorite climatologist - Dr. Timo Niroma of Helsinki, Finland - has a couple of web sites that look at the historical record of the link of Earth's climate with solar activity.

http://www.kolumbus.fi/tilmari/gwuppsala.htm

http://personal.inet.fi/tiede/tilmari/sunspots.html

With kind regards
Oliver K. Manuel
http://www.omatumr.com
« Last Edit: 26/07/2009 20:07:00 by om »

neilep

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A Floral Aurora Corona
Credit & Copyright: Zoltan Kenwell (Infocus Imagery)






 Few auroras show this level of detail. Above, a standard digital camera captured a particularly active and colorful auroral corona that occurred last week above Alberta, Canada. With a shape reminiscent of a flower, the spectacular aurora had an unusually high degree of detail. The vivid green and purple auroral colors are caused by high atmospheric oxygen and hydrogen reacting to a burst of incoming electrons. Many photogenic auroras have been triggered from a solar wind stream that recently passed the Earth. The auroras were unexpected because the initiating Sun has been unusually quiet of late.

neilep

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SARYCHEV PEAK VOLCANO



This photo was taken from the International Space Station by an astronaut who just happend to be passing at the right time.

amazing eh ?



om

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ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL!

How little we know about the object beneath our feet!

The material that it continues to collect every day from outer space.

Material that squirts out in volcanos and cracks in the deep ocean floor.

Fifty years ago I started a scientific investigation of Earth's Genesis.

The journey has been rewarding beyond my wildest dreams.

What a beautiful laboratory for those who want to learn!

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
http://www.omatumr.com

PS - I will be 73 years old in a couple of months, approaching the end of life.  I hope to write a biography on the fifty (50) year anniversary of the start of my effort in 1960 to rewrite the Biblical story of Genesis from a scientific point of view [See: "My Journey to the Core of the Sun", in preparation].

The late Nuclear Geochemistry Professor (Paul) Kazuo Kuroda, convinced me to undertake this study in 1960 with reports that the nuclear reactions that produced our elements were still visible as decay products of extinct iodine-129, extinct palladium-107, and extinct plutonium-244, as well as poorly mixed isotopes of element #54 (xenon) in meteorites and in the Earth.  All of these findings have been confirmed, and many other records of the birth of the solar system five billion years (5 Gyr) ago from fresh supernova debris!   

The late Physics Professor John H. Reynolds developed and in 1962-1964 showed me how to operate the mass spectrometer that revealed other recordings of element synthesis in the supernova debris that orbits the Sun and an unmistakable clue to the compact, energetic object at the core of the Sun.   

« Last Edit: 04/08/2009 18:41:25 by om »

neilep

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Saturn's Iapetus: Painted Moon
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA





What has happened to Saturn's moon Iapetus? Vast sections of this strange world are dark as coal, while others are as bright as ice. The composition of the dark material is unknown, but infrared spectra indicate that it possibly contains some dark form of carbon. Iapetus also has an unusual equatorial ridge that makes it appear like a walnut. To help better understand this seemingly painted moon, NASA directed the robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn to swoop within 2,000 kilometers in 2007. Pictured above, from about 75,000 kilometers out, Cassini's trajectory allowed unprecedented imaging of the hemisphere of Iapetus that is always trailing. A huge impact crater seen in the south spans a tremendous 450 kilometers and appears superposed on an older crater of similar size. The dark material is seen increasingly coating the easternmost part of Iapetus, darkening craters and highlands alike. Close inspection indicates that the dark coating typically faces the moon's equator and is less than a meter thick. A leading hypothesis is that the dark material is mostly dirt leftover when relatively warm but dirty ice sublimates. An initial coating of dark material may have been effectively painted on by the accretion of meteor-liberated debris from other moons. This and other images from Cassini's Iapetus flyby are being studied for even greater clues.

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Diamonds in a Cloudy Sky
Credit & Copyright: Óscar Martín Mesonero (OSAE), SAROS Group




 Cloudy skies over Wuhan, China hid the delicate solar corona during July's total eclipse of the Sun. Still, the Moon's silhouette was highlighted by these glistening diamonds as the total eclipse phase ended. Caused by bright sunlight streaming through dips and valleys in the irregular terrain along the Moon's edge, the effect is known as Baily's Beads, named after Francis Baily who called attention to the phenomenon in 1836. The dramatic appearance of the beads at the beginning or end of a total solar eclipse is also known as the Diamond Ring effect. In this remarkable image, a small, pinkish solar prominence can also be seen along the edge, below the diamonds.

neilep

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The Star Clusters of NGC 1313
Credit: NASA, ESA, Anne Pellerin (STScI)


Biggy Piccy HERE


 Like grains of sand on a cosmic beach, individual stars of barred spiral galaxy NGC 1313 are resolved in this sharp composite from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The inner region of the galaxy is pictured, spanning about 10,000 light-years. Hubble's unique ability to distinguish individual stars in the 14 million light-year distant galaxy has been used to unravel the fate of star clusters whose bright young stars are spread through the disk of the galaxy as the clusters dissolve. The exploration of stars and clusters in external galaxy NGC 1313 offers clues to star formation and star cluster evolution in our own Milky Way

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The Milky Way Over the Badlands
Credit & Copyright: Wally Pacholka (AstroPics.com, TWAN)



 Why take a picture of just the Badlands when you can take one that also shows the spectacular sky above it? Just such a picture, actually a digital stitched panorama of four images, was taken in late June near midnight, looking southwest. In the foreground, the unusual buttes of the Badlands Wall, part of the Badlands National Park in South Dakota, USA, were momentarily illuminated by flashlight during a long duration exposure of the background night sky. The mountain-like buttes visible are composed of soft rock that show sharp erosion features from wind and water. The South Dakota Badlands also contain ancient beds rich with easy-to-find fossils. Some fossils are over 25 million years old and hold clues to the evolutionary origins of the horse and the saber-toothed tiger. Bright Jupiter dominates the sky on the left just above the buttes, while the spectacular Milky Way Galaxy runs down the image right.

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The Gum Nebula
Credit & Copyright: Axel Mellinger




Named for Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum (1924-1960), The Gum Nebula is so large and close it is actually hard to see. In fact, we are only about 450 light-years from the front edge and 1,500 light-years from the back edge of this cosmic cloud of glowing hydrogen gas. Covered in this 41 degree-wide mosaic of H-alpha images, the faint emission region is otherwise easy to lose against the background of Milky Way stars. The complex nebula is thought to be a supernova remnant over a million years old, sprawling across the southern constellations Vela and Puppis. Sliding your cursor over this spectacular wide field view will reveal the location of objects embedded in The Gum Nebula, including the Vela supernova remnant.

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NGC 7822 in Cepheus
Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman







 Pillars of gas, dust, and young, hot stars fill the center of NGC 7822. At the edge of a giant molecular cloud toward the northern constellation Cepheus, the glowing star forming region lies about 3,000 light-years away. Within the nebula, bright edges and tantalizing shapes are highlighted in this colorful skyscape. The image includes data from both broadband and narrowband filters, mapping emission from atomic oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur into blue, green, and red hues. The atomic emission is powered by the energetic radiation from the hot stars, whose powerful winds and radiation also sculpt and erode the denser pillar shapes. Stars could still be forming inside the pillars by gravitational collapse, but as the pillars are eroded away, any forming stars will ultimately be cutoff from their reservoir of star stuff. This field spans around 30 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 7822.

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The Butterfly Nebula from Upgraded Hubble
Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team




 The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth's night sky are often named for flowers or insects, and NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the central star of this particular planetary nebula is exceptionally hot though -- shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This dramatically detailed close-up of the dying star's nebula was recorded by the newly upgraded Hubble Space Telescope. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star's dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation Scorpius.

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To Fly Free in Space
Credit: STS-41B, NASA



 At about 100 meters from the cargo bay of the space shuttle Challenger, Bruce McCandless II was farther out than anyone had ever been before. Guided by a Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), astronaut McCandless, pictured above, was floating free in space. McCandless and fellow NASA astronaut Robert Stewart were the first to experience such an "untethered space walk" during Space Shuttle mission 41-B in 1984. The MMU works by shooting jets of nitrogen and has since been used to help deploy and retrieve satellites. With a mass over 140 kilograms, an MMU is heavy on Earth, but, like everything, is weightless when drifting in orbit. The MMU was replaced with the SAFER backpack propulsion unit.


 

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