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Author Topic: Recommended reading?  (Read 5076 times)

Offline frethack

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Recommended reading?
« on: 20/08/2007 20:24:25 »
Any recommended reading from the Geologists out there to a lowly geo student?

Lately Ive been very into paleoclimate (esp. Quaternary), but I would like to get into some reading that will help other areas of my undergrad studies. (You need impeccable grades when youre poor and cant afford a good grad school without assistance!)  Ive bought some of the basics (Dictionary of Geological Terms, Geology in the Field, etc...saving for copies of AGI Data Sheets, and a glossary of geology), but anything else would be greatly appreciated.

« Last Edit: 20/08/2007 20:29:02 by frethack »


 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #1 on: 20/08/2007 20:39:00 »
Start with a classic - it will be on you doctoral defense, I guarantee it.

It is "Principle of Physical Geology" by Arthur Holms. My second edition is probably obsolete but the foundation of all the developments made since this book was first published have all grown from the thoughts and principles set down in this tome.

Layhe's Field Geology is also a must and a classic as well. GPS changes a lot of surveying, (Thank God!) BUT ....the rocks didn't change.

If you are into Quaternary climate the Blancoan Climate described by Ernest Lundelius, is a gem.

The GRE covers EVERYTHING. Learn what fossils define susch and such, what is the basis for the International Commission on Stratigraphy's time scale? Read as much trivia as you can. It was just my experience that the trivia was what was on my first GRE.

 
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #2 on: 20/08/2007 21:56:48 »
Dana's minerology is another necessary text
 

Offline pete_inthehills

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« Reply #3 on: 20/08/2007 22:35:49 »
"Principle of Physical Geology" by Arthur Holms.

woo man, that's a beast of a book.  Don't try it in one sitting.

I read a couple of "coffee table" geology books like reading the rocks by marcia Bjornerud.

But what I really like was a really good geological guide to an area close to you.  There is nothing better than reading about the geology of somewhere and then going out and following the route and seeing for yourself certain contacts, a nice dyke swarm or shell bed.

pete
inthehills
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #4 on: 21/08/2007 00:24:20 »
Yep, it is a beast of a book but it is also a monument to A. H.'s amount of learning and intelligence.

Sorry I forgot about Dana's Manual of Mineralogy, I have it but refer to Deer, Howie and Zuzusman more than Dana's. I did need to buy D.H.Z on my own after college, though, Dana's was the text.
 

Offline neilep

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« Reply #5 on: 21/08/2007 02:04:22 »
'Barneys Book Of Rocks '

A fun read whilst eating Jam Sandwiches !
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #6 on: 21/08/2007 14:49:28 »
I see lots of optometrist visits in my future  ;D

How does Layhes Field Geology compare to Comptons Geology in the Field?  Ive googled Layhe but can only find a few texts from him concerning stratigraphy in Arizona (if its the same Layhe...Robert?)

The 2nd Ed of Holms shouldnt be TOO out of date, as 3rd Ed is the newest that I can find.  I will certainly pick this one up...especially if it will be on my doctoral defense.

Manual of mineralogy will probably do me a world of good.  I havent taken any comprehensive mineralogy courses yet, but I can tell that this will probably be my weakest area from the basics that I have received.

Lundelius is from UT?  When I googled his name it showed him as retired, but still doing research.  I wonder if he is still affiliated with the University.  I do not see his book online, but maybe I can find it in the library.

As far as Barneys Book of Rocks...is it narrated by THE purple dinosaur???  If its not, Ill be disappointed.  ;)

Thank for the recommended reading!  I have a feeling Ill be in cross-referencing hell.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #7 on: 21/08/2007 18:50:32 »
frethack

Layhe's is probably no longer published BUT I am not the one to ask on field geology. Bass is the authority. I graduated with just a smattering of field experience as I was on crutches due to arthritis by my Junior year and never had a proper field course. I did large subsurface studies integrated with interpretations of seismic lines in place of 6 weeks of sweaty hell.

Ernie Lundelieus is still alive and kicking, email him and ask him the reference. It is in a vertebrate paleontology journal. I knew him while in school.

I need to go to the doctor's so will be back later.



 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #8 on: 21/08/2007 20:47:35 »
I don't own Layhe, but have used it on occaision.  I use Compton frequently- it is probably the most recognized field geology manual.  In Australia a few years after grad school, I picked up "Field Geologists' Manual", compiled by Berkman and published by the The Austrailian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.  Probably because my main interest is mineral exploration, I've found this to be the most useful of all the field geology books.
 

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