Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology => Topic started by: The Scientist on 03/07/2010 10:02:26

Title: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: The Scientist on 03/07/2010 10:02:26
Please provide explanations. Thanks!
Title: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Carbonizer on 03/07/2010 15:14:10
The litre of water weighs more, and this is why ice floats in water. When water freezes, it expands and becomes becomes less dense. While it is true that most things are more dense in their solid state, it is not true of water.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: JaneMiller on 02/05/2018 04:09:14
I agree with Carbonizer. Water is heavier
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Bill S on 03/05/2018 00:06:20
Would this distinction hold in zero gravity?
I would think not, but I've been wrong before. :)
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: chiralSPO on 03/05/2018 00:09:55
Would this distinction hold in zero gravity?
I would think not, but I've been wrong before. :)

I think you are correct.

1 L of water is more massive than 1 L of ice. This will translate into greater weight if any force is applied to the samples.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: wolfekeeper on 03/05/2018 01:14:06
It depends. A litre of ice can have a density of 1.65 times that of normal water, so I'm going with ice, unless it's specified to be at normal pressure, in which case it's water that is denser:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_VII (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_VII)
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: evan_au on 03/05/2018 09:37:34
This chart suggests that even at -200C, ice is less dense than liquid water at 100C.
I assume that this is taken at standard pressure, so that no exotic phases of ice were present.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Density_of_ice_and_water_(en).svg
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: PmbPhy on 03/05/2018 11:28:29
Would this distinction hold in zero gravity?
I would think not, but I've been wrong before. :)
Water would still be more dense so if you had a comnination of water and ice in a centrifuge aboard the ISS the ice would still float to the surface of the water. But since nothing weighs anything in a weightless environment they its meaningless as you said.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: LaurenaS on 19/01/2021 15:38:06
I guess the answer to this question is slightly open. Water is actually denser than ice at one liter. So I would say water. And if the same one liter of water gets frozen it even gain more on its volum
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Halc on 19/01/2021 17:47:30
I guess the answer to this question is slightly open.
The question was answered 10 years ago by the first reply. Any reason you are finding the need to dredge up all these old threads asked by people no longer active on the site?

Quote
Water is actually denser than ice at one liter.
This comment makes it sound like ice might be more dense than water at a different volume.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: myuncle on 28/01/2021 01:51:51
Isn't 1kg of iron=1 kg of wool?
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: chiralSPO on 28/01/2021 02:35:37
Isn't 1kg of iron=1 kg of wool?
yes, but liters (volume) ≠ kg (mass)
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: myuncle on 28/01/2021 12:58:01
Isn't 1kg of iron=1 kg of wool?
yes, but liters (volume) ≠ kg (mass)

I know, but the question was about weight, not about mass, volume or density.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Halc on 28/01/2021 13:34:11
I know, but the question was about weight, not about mass, volume or density.
The (11 year old) question was about the weight of two equal volumes, not the weight of two equal masses.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: myuncle on 28/01/2021 14:15:23
I know, but the question was about weight, not about mass, volume or density.
The (11 year old) question was about the weight of two equal volumes, not the weight of two equal masses.

The word volume is not even mentioned, it asks only about the weight.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Bored chemist on 28/01/2021 14:58:09
The word volume is not even mentioned
The word "litre" is used, and that specifies a volume.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Janus on 28/01/2021 16:31:14
I know, but the question was about weight, not about mass, volume or density.
The (11 year old) question was about the weight of two equal volumes, not the weight of two equal masses.

The word volume is not even mentioned, it asks only about the weight.
Litre = volume. 
Now is is true that 1 litre = ~1.057 qt. , and 1 qt = 32 fl oz.
Since an ounce is a measure of weight, I could see where someone might make the mistake of thinking a litre could also be a weight.
However, qts are measured in "fluid ounces", and fluid ounces are units of volume, not weight.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: myuncle on 28/01/2021 18:16:16
Ah, ok, I thought the weight was only about the attraction towards the Earth, measured in Newton, and the mass is measured in Kg, regardless of temperature or gravity.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: alancalverd on 28/01/2021 18:39:20
The fact remains that a liter of water has a greater mass than a liter of ice, and therefore in any gravitational field, a greater weight. Temperature is important (or irrelevant, depending on how you look at it!)  because at ambient pressures you can only have both ice and water present at 273.15K.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: AntonySilva on 04/02/2021 21:32:03
I think a liter of water
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: charles1948 on 04/02/2021 22:31:19
 These posts are very interesting.  They lead me to wonder: Suppose we think about  so-called "heavy water".

You know what I'm referring to. The water used in nuclear research, such as making the atomic bomb.

How much heavier is it than ordinary water, and if it's frozen, is its ice heavier?
 
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Bored chemist on 04/02/2021 23:03:39
How much heavier is it than ordinary water
About 10%, whether it's solid or liquid (or gas, come to that)
"Heavy ice" will sink in ordinary water.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: Petrochemicals on 05/02/2021 05:30:13
Depends on what you are holding it in.
Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: alancalverd on 05/02/2021 12:56:39
Now is is true that 1 litre = ~1.057 qt. , and 1 qt = 32 fl oz.
Only in the USA.

A quart is 2 pints (a quarter of a gallon)  wherever you are. But a US pint is 16 fl oz, whilst an Imperial pint is 20 fl oz, which is why the US gallon is 6 Imperial pints but 8 US pints, i.e. 4 quarts. This partially accounts for the poor published fuel consumption of American cars: a British car is 33% more efficient!

Title: Re: Which weighs more, a litre of ice or a litre of water?
Post by: charles1948 on 05/02/2021 20:17:35
Why is the US so resistant to the metric system.

I think that in the early years of the Space Age, it was because US astronauts might get confused in an emergency.

Such as a meteorite puncturing the thin metal skin of their Mercury, or Gemini space capsule. 

In such a case, the astronauts might radio to ground-control: "Houston, we have a problem. We have a leak. Our oxygen is rapidly venting"

Houston might reply: "Roger, to plug the leak, insert stuffing into the hole.  It's 16 centimetres to the left of switch A on your console"

The astronauts would reply: " Say that again, Houston, what's 16 centimetres  ..... agh ,  we can't breathe......"