Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Technology => Topic started by: TheFoolishOne on 29/01/2021 11:54:14

Title: What is the principle behind Remote Wireless Charging?
Post by: TheFoolishOne on 29/01/2021 11:54:14
Recently, I've come across the new release of the Xiaomi, the Remote Wireless Charger. The question I've been thinking is that how much energy was loss by the distance from charger when charging and the principle behind it? An irrelevant question, Is this applicable to Tesla by remotely charging them instead of plugging them in?
Title: Re: What is the principle behind Remote Wireless Charging?
Post by: alancalverd on 29/01/2021 14:52:28
Xiaomi is pretty clever, but pointless. It locates your phone then uses a phased array to direct a radiofrequency signal to wherever it is. The system is limited to 5 watts for indoor use but phased array radar, which has been around since the 1940s, is run at megawatt levels over tens of miles. I've had a mobile phone destroyed by the forward-looking radar of a parked airliner, and there have been instances of fighter pilots "killing" tractors with their missile lock radars.
Title: Re: What is the principle behind Remote Wireless Charging?
Post by: evan_au on 30/01/2021 09:03:41
Quote from: OP
Is (remote wireless charging) applicable to Tesla by remotely charging?
Phased-array transmitters are the type of thing that is stretching the technology of 5G base stations.
- If you aren't going to that extreme, then inductive charging is the way to go
- For efficient transfer, your transmitter coil and receiver coil should be closer than the diameter of the transmitter coil.
- There have been experiments embedding wireless chargers in roads, so that electric buses can recharge while they load and unload passengers.

There are some fairly strict regulations about the power levels and frequency of operation of radio transmitters (which this is), so if you want fast charging (at home, or beside the highway), a plug-in charger is a better way to go.