Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology => Topic started by: evan_au on 11/06/2020 11:44:34

Title: What is the difference between a superconductor and a Bose-Einstein Condensate?
Post by: evan_au on 11/06/2020 11:44:34
This week's Naked Scientists podcast had a focus on Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC).
- I found it very informative - thanks!
- But I thought superconductors were an example of a BEC?
- I don't recall a mention of superconductivity in this discussion...

How does a superconductor differ from a Bose-Einstein Condensate?

Listen from 39:36: https://www.thenakedscientists.com/podcasts/naked-scientists-podcast/fifth-state-matter
Title: Re: What is the difference between a superconductor and a Bose-Einstein Condensate?
Post by: alancalverd on 11/06/2020 22:38:11
As I understand it (faintly) a BEC is a particular state of bosons, whereas a superconductor is a state where electrons behave as bosons, so it might be possible but not inevitable to form a BEC in a superconductor.
Title: Re: What is the difference between a superconductor and a Bose-Einstein Condensate?
Post by: evan_au on 12/06/2020 04:15:37
A sidenote on the ISS BEC lab: there is an article in Nature journal about this experiment.

There is an interview with one of the experimenters here (start at 1:18; duration 7 minutes):
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01761-3
Article here (behind Nature paywall): https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2346-1