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On the Lighter Side => New Theories => Topic started by: talanum1 on 15/10/2021 19:50:50

Title: Is this Explanation of Atomic Relaxation Correct?
Post by: talanum1 on 15/10/2021 19:50:50
1. Emittance of a Photon.

  The assumption must be made that it is encoded into an Atom of where the Energy levels are located and the amount of energy an electron in them has. Thus the Atom must have encoded into it the quantum numbers of possible electrons in its shells. Then it is easy conceptual reasoning that explains how an Atom decays:

(1) The electron in an excited shell reads the Atom and finds an empty orbital of lower energy.

(2) The electron instructs space that it wants to jump to a lower orbital.

(3) Space computes using the electromagnetic field the energy difference between the current and lower orbital.

(4) The electron field interacts with the electromagnetic field and in the process space copies a 2-dimensional slice of space, into a Riemann sphere, to become the emitted photon.

Here is where experiment must come in to help: just where is the photon released? Is it released at orbital n or at orbital n-1 or in the middle of the two? The most reasonable guess is that it is released at orbital n since the electron jumps instantaneously to orbital n-1. This must be tested by experiment.

(5) Space computes the momentum size and direction of the photon from the energy difference and the elecron velocity tangent vector and encodes it into the proto-photon.

(6) Space subtracts the momentum from that of the electron in orbital n, deletes the momentum of the electron and encodes the new momentum.

(7) Now we have an electron with too little momentum in orbital n, so the electron field transports the electron to orbital n-1 and at the same time the photon is accelerated by the electromagnetic field to the speed of light by a force on it (as explained in ref. [2]). We explained how two things can happen simultaneously: two fields are involved.

  Now we may compute in principle exactly how long an Atom will remain in an excited state: the length in time of the computation in item 5 plus the time it takes for item 1 (this may depend on a probability). All that is needed is an estimate of how much time is needed for space to complete one operation. A first guess would be: 1 x Planck time (tpl) per operation. An atom may be forced to decay (do item 1) by observing it. Then for computing the size of the momentum we would need: 2 x 6 x tpl to read the two values (both having 6 digit accuracy) and 6 x tpl to do the subtraction and 6 x tpl to convert energy to momentum. Therefore we would need 24 x tpl to do the calculation.
Title: Re: Is this Explanation of Atomic Relaxation Correct?
Post by: Bored chemist on 15/10/2021 20:55:27
Is this Explanation of Atomic Relaxation Correct?
No it is
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Not_even_wrong
Title: Re: Is this Explanation of Atomic Relaxation Correct?
Post by: talanum1 on 17/10/2021 15:20:48
My model explains explicitly how a photon is created and what it is. You can't do the same because you cannot explain what Energy is (other than "it is a number").
Title: Re: Is this Explanation of Atomic Relaxation Correct?
Post by: Bored chemist on 17/10/2021 16:38:08
You can't do the same because you cannot explain what Energy is (other than "it is a number").
Yes I can.
My model explains explicitly how a photon is created and what it is.
No, it doesn't