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On the Lighter Side => New Theories => Topic started by: Yusup Hizirov on 12/08/2018 08:20:54

Title: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 12/08/2018 08:20:54
According to the Static theory of Newton's tides, the "Moon tidal current" moves from east to west at a speed of 1600 km / h, skirting the Earth in 24 hours, wiping the ocean floor and flooding only the eastern coasts of the continents. But through the centuries it was discovered:

1. That the "Moon tidal wave" floods both the western and southern and northern coasts of the continents.
2. That the tidal wave velocity is 1600 km / h, is fatal both for continents and marine fauna ..

Laplace proposed a dynamic model of tides, allowing a lag (up to 800 km / h) and twists of the tidal hump due to friction on the ocean floor. And to show the magnitude of the backwardness of the hump, the applied hours (from 0 to 12) were introduced.
Although it would be more practical to introduce applied kilometers, then it would be possible to determine the location of the moon, both in longitude and latitude.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 12/08/2018 08:32:16
The period of tidal oscillations on Earth is 12 hours and 25 minutes. And in order to meet the fluctuations in this period, the "Moon tidal wave" should rotate around the Earth at a speed of 1600 km / h. Reducing the speed of the tidal wave due to friction on the ocean floor to 1,400 km / h will increase the period of fluctuations of the tides to 14 hours, and for this, the day should last 28 hours. Conclusion: Movement "Moon of the tidal wave" with a speed of less than 1600 km / h can not be adjusted without increasing the duration of the day.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 12/08/2018 09:06:26
The application hour is an instrument for fitting the lunar theory of tides to real reality.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Bored chemist on 12/08/2018 09:16:36
According to the Static theory of Newton's tides, the "Moon tidal current" moves from east to west at a speed of 1600 km / h,
You keep making the same mistake.
It's not a current
I explained this to you here
https://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=74386.msg550379#msg550379
 but you didn't pay attention.

Once you realise that you are basing your ideas on a mistake, you might start to learn how the tides really work.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 12/08/2018 11:31:16
Because tides are an extreme example of a shallow-water wave, friction with the ocean floor slows tides to a speed of about 700 kilometers per hour (435 miles per hour).
https://www.encyclopedia.com/earth-and-environment/geology-and-oceanography/geology-and-oceanography/tides
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Bored chemist on 12/08/2018 12:48:43
To go back to the analogy I made earlier. I can move the bulge along the carpet at any speed I like. It has nothing to do with the intrinsic "speed of waves in carpet" (which would be roughly the speed of sound).

The idea that there is a single speed makes little sense anyway.
The wave has to go round the world in 12hrs 25 min.
But near the poles it hasn't got so far to travel as it has at the equator.

How can you say the tidal bulge has a speed when that speed varies with latitude (in principle, to zero near the poles)?
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 15/08/2018 14:35:59
How does the applied hour in the encyclopedia do not write anything I think this concept is virtual.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Colin2B on 15/08/2018 15:02:47
The main users of tidal information are sailors. Providing tidal information related to time is more useful than relating it to distance.
If I want to know the state of tide at a particular location I want to know how high it is at a particular time.
It has nothing to do with fitting tide theory to reality.

I regularly sail in the English Channel. For the draft of my boat, the port I use has a tidal gate - a depth limitation - for entrance and exit on neaps. I know that I have no limitation on springs. If I want to know whether I am free to sail out I donít need tide tables, I just look at the state of the moon.
Ask any sailor, they will tell you without hesitation that the tides are controlled by the moon and sun, experience and observation tells them this is so.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Janus on 15/08/2018 16:46:55
To add to what Bored chemist has said. The OP seems to think tidal bulges move like this:
 [ Invalid Attachment ]
With the blue inner circle the Earth and striped oval the oceans, and the Moon dragging the ocean around with it.

However, what it really happening is this:
 [ Invalid Attachment ]

The gravity of the Moon distorts the shape of the ocean, but the body of the ocean does not follow the Moon, as shown by the fact that the lines representing the ocean don't move relative to the body of the Earth, just the bulge,
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Colin2B on 15/08/2018 18:13:51
@Janus I agree, OP has very poor understanding of wave motion, and the difference between a freely propagating wave eg generated by wind or tsunami, and a forced wave where the entire body of water is lifted.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Bored chemist on 15/08/2018 19:03:48
To add to what Bored chemist has said. The OP seems to think tidal bulges move like this:

* tides1.gif (292.01 kB . 512x384 - viewed 3936 times)
With the blue inner circle the Earth and striped oval the oceans, and the Moon dragging the ocean around with it.

However, what it really happening is this:

* tides2.gif (131.91 kB . 512x384 - viewed 3841 times)

The gravity of the Moon distorts the shape of the ocean, but the body of the ocean does not follow the Moon, as shown by the fact that the lines representing the ocean don't move relative to the body of the Earth, just the bulge,
Thanks
That's  a really clear illustration of the difference between what actually happens, and what the OP (apparently) thinks happens.
I wonder if he will be able to learn from it.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 16/08/2018 08:53:01
The main users of tidal information are sailors. Providing tidal information related to time is more useful than relating it to distance.
If I want to know the state of tide at a particular location I want to know how high it is at a particular time.
It has nothing to do with fitting tide theory to reality.
This is your point of view or the point of view of official science, if the official science please give a link to this information.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Colin2B on 16/08/2018 09:12:26
Read any tide table, they are produced by the science and used by the punters
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 18/08/2018 19:19:18
If I want to know whether I am free to sail out I donít need tide tables, I just look at the state of the moon.
This is already too much.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Bored chemist on 18/08/2018 21:01:45
This is already too much.
What is that meant to mean?
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Yusup Hizirov on 19/08/2018 13:27:38
This is already too much.
What is that meant to mean?
This means that everyone is oriented to the Moon and the Sun, and Colin2B only to the Moon.
Title: Re: What is the applied hour in the theory of tides?
Post by: Bored chemist on 19/08/2018 13:33:57
This is already too much.
What is that meant to mean?
This means that everyone is oriented to the Moon and the Sun, and he is only on the Moon.
Who is "he".
In what way is anyone" oriented to the moon"?