Naked Science Forum

Non Life Sciences => Technology => Topic started by: chris on 19/03/2009 22:05:01

Title: How does the F1 "KERS" system work?
Post by: chris on 19/03/2009 22:05:01
I was asked about this recently and had to admit that I'd never heard of it - what is this and what's the mechanism?

Chris
Title: How does the F1 "KERS" system work?
Post by: neilep on 19/03/2009 23:57:18
Are you sure Chris that this was not a disgruntled ITV employee showing dismay at the the fact that the F1 is now going to be on BBC ?
Title: How does the F1 "KERS" system work?
Post by: DoctorBeaver on 20/03/2009 00:30:45

extract from http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/motorsport/formula_one/7947575.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/motorsport/formula_one/7947575.stm)
Renault have become the first team to say they will definitely use their new energy storage and power boost system (Kers) at the year's first race.

The technology stores energy that would have been wasted while braking and allows drivers a boost of an extra 80bhp for seven seconds each lap
Title: How does the F1 "KERS" system work?
Post by: Chemistry4me on 20/03/2009 01:14:32
It stands for: Kinetic Energy Recovery System.
Title: How does the F1 "KERS" system work?
Post by: Chemistry4me on 20/03/2009 01:18:10
Quote
1. What is KERS?

Itís a system whereby the goal is to store the energy produced under braking in a reservoir (either batteries or flywheel) in order to release it under acceleration. The 2009 technical regulations state that KERS should not deliver power in excess of 60kW, which is equivalent to around 80 horsepower, when the driver presses a button on the steering wheel. He cannot use more than 400kJ per lap.

2. Is there only one way to recover the energy and reuse it?

When the 2009 KERS system was being conceived, the engineers had a choice between two different approaches. The first consisted of using a carbon flywheel in a vacuum linked via a CVT transmission to the differential. This system stores the mechanical energy, offers a big storage capacity and has the advantage of being independent from the gearbox. However, to be driven precisely, it requires some powerful and bulky actuators, and lots of space. The second option was to rely on an electrical motor, which works by charging the batteries under braking and releasing the power on acceleration.

http://www.formula1.com/news/features/2009/1/8887.html